Discussion on the Communication Notebook

COM200 Final NoteBook
Instructions for completing the Communication Notebook:NOTE: Be sure to carefully review your work and the grading rubrics to ensure you have completed all required elements. Score yourself on each grading rubric and make adjustments to areas where you scored yourself low.The Communication Notebook final paperFor further assistance with the formatting and the title page, refer to APA Formatting for Word 2013 (Links to an external site.).

Week 5 Communication Notebook Video Resources

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The following video resources are designed to help you think about the themes you will cover in this final assignment. Many have been referred to previously, but all should help you in making your points.  We cover culture and nonverbal communication, gender, class, and race/ethnicity.  Then, we address how we can connect to others and computer-mediated communication.

 

Culture: There are seven videos on culture.  Watch what you think is interesting and/or important.

 

1) Nonverbal communication.

 

Riccardi, P.  (2014, October 21).  Cross cultural communication.  TED X – Bergen.  Retrieved July 14, 2019 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMyofREc5Jk

 

Description: An Italian who lived in England and then moved to Norway discusses the many cultural differences he has witnessed.  As you watch, focus on the ways he addresses nonverbal cues specifically.  Bevan lists four broad categories of nonverbal communication, including haptics, proxemics, paralanguage, and kinesics. Here, you will explore the ways culture trains us about what is “normal” in each of these areas.

 

2) Communication and Gender

 

Different styles/different cultures:

 

Nelson, A.  (2014, April 30).  A paradigm for understanding how men and women communicate.  Youtube.com.  Retrieved August 21, 2019 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ooc5pOrYP24

 

Description:  Communication specialist Audrey addresses discusses some basic differences between men and women speaking patterns and how we should process these different forms of communication.  Specifically, she outlines how women tend to be more indirect and men more direct, that men are more goal-oriented and women more process—oriented, men are more content-oriented and women are more feeling-oriented, and men are more self-oriented and women more other-oriented.  Think of how these are connected to Bevan’s points.

 

3) Gender and language rituals:

 

Tannen, D.  (2013, December 27).  Gender-specific language rituals. youtube.com.  Retrieved July 14, 2019 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUxnBZxsfoU

 

Description: Psychologist Deborah Tannen argues that we learn gendered patterns of communication from a young age.  In this interview, Tannen talks about some of her ideas about how children learn patterns of communication covered in Bevan.  While it an older video, it is still interesting.  As you watch, think about whether her key points still stand in the 21st century.

 

4) Social class, dialects and stereotypes.

 

Alvarez, L. & Kolker, A.  (2001, September 23).  Episode One: A nation of tribes.  People like us.  The Center for New American Media, WETA, and Independent Television Series.  Retrieved July 14, 2019 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nU5MtVM_zFs

 

Description: In the United States, most people envision that we are classless or that almost everyone is “middle class.” But social class does exist and is not just based on income we make, but also influences how we speak, how we move, where we live, media use patterns, the products we purchase, and hobbies we enjoy.  Here we learn how social class subtly divides us into “tribes” and unites us within those units as well.  When you watch, think about the role of nonverbal cues in this classification system and the ways people talk about others.

 

5) Linguistic prejudice

 

Lieberman, M.  (2014, November 12).  Sociolinguistics and dialects.  The Ling Space. Retrieved August 20, 2019 from http://www.thelingspace.com/episode-11.

 

Description: Linguist Moti Lieberman explains the idea of dialects and contends that all are equal, from a scientific position.  However, through class, age, region, religion, or other factors, some can frame theirs as superior or “proper,” while others are not (a type of prejudice).  This is true of African American Vernacular English specifically.  As you watch, think about whether one should be strategic about how they speak in different contexts to achieve their goals.

 

6) Racial Literacy

Volchi, P. & Guo, W.  (2017, November).  What it takes to be racially literate.  TEDWomen.  Retrieved July 14, 2019 from  https://www.ted.com/talks/priya_vulchi_and_winona_guo_what_it_takes_to_be_racially_literate

Description: Racial literacy – Two high school students, Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo report on that race means and how we need to develop what they call racial literacy.  Two important things are the value of effective interpersonal conversations and self-control.

7) Focusing on similarity over difference:

Nimenya, S.  (2016).  We are not all that different: Race and culture identity.  Youtube.com.  Retrieved August 26, 2019 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QuAok_Xiyg&t=338s

 

Description: Activist Seconde Nimenya addresses the idea of “difference” specifically, and how it intersects with race and ethnicity, especially in the United States. She chooses being better over being “bitter.” This allowed her to try to create bridges between cultures. Pay close attention to what she has to say about the idea of “difference” and how the cultural training we receive that focuses on difference can lead to stereotypes and biases. She shares three strategies for how we can use to celebrate difference as a value to achieve tolerance and peace.

 

Relationship Formation/Maintenance – Connecting to Others:

 

1) Self-Disclosure and being gay

 

Bailey, M.  (2014, November).  The danger of hiding who you are.  Retrieved September 23, 2019 from https://www.ted.com/talks/morgana_bailey_the_danger_of_hiding_who_you_are?language=en

 

Description: Activist Morgan Bailey discusses the dangers of hiding fundamental, personal information about oneself.  As you watch, think about how that personal information (her being a lesbian) impacted her psychological and physical health.  Why was sharing this information with others so important both individually and socially?  When should we change ourselves to fit in and when should we speak out?

 

2) Social support and life expectancy

 

Pinker, S.  (2017, April).  The secret to a longer life might be your social life.  Retrieved September 23, 2019 from https://www.ted.com/talks/susan_pinker_the_secret_to_living_longer_may_be_your_social_life?language=en

 

Description: Why might social activity be linked to longer life?  In this talk, writer Susan Pinker investigates the role of social connection in living a long life.  This focus on personal connection appears to be a key to both happiness and longevity.  How does our shift to electronic communication and social isolation undermine personal connection?

 

3) Convey caring through conversation

 

Headlee, C.  (2015, May 7).  How to have a good conversation.  TEDx – Creative Coasthttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6n3iNh4XLI

Description:  Journalist Celeste Headlee offers advice about the importance of genuinely listening and says that it is important to acknowledge that communication involves both a speaker and a hearer.  We must learn to listen to understand, not just to reply.  In doing so, we convey we care and are consideration of others.

 

4) Relationship Maintenance – The power of vulnerability

Brown, B. (2010).  The power of vulnerability. TEDxHouston. Retrieved July 14, 2019 from https://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability?referrer=playlist-when_you_re_having_a_hard_time

Description:  Storyteller-researcher Brene Brown explores the idea of empathy and how it is fundamental to positive relationships.  Connecting to others is at the center of her speech and we do this through both verbal and nonverbal communication.  The opposite of connection is shame.  Watch her speech to hear more about how to overcome shame, be compassionate, and connect to others.  Much of this involves being vulnerable.  Can vulnerability lead to healthier relationships?  Watch her speech to see if you agree.

5) Mindfulness

Shapiro, S.  (2017, March 10). The power of mindfulness: What you practice grows stronger.  TEDXWashingtonSquare.  Retrieved July 14, 2019 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IeblJdB2-Vo

Description:  While we often give lip service to mindfulness, in this speech, mindfulness expert Shawna Shapiro explains the benefits of what she calls “kind attention” and some steps to achieving it.  As you think about improving your own communication, think about the ways that presence and kindness, to both yourself and others, can be instrumental to success in all areas of life.

Online cultures

 

Online bubbles and our narrowing reality

 

Pariser, E.  (2011, May 2).  Beware online “filter bubbles.”   TED.  Retrieved July 14, 2019 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8ofWFx525s.

 

Description: In this presentation, internet activist Eli Pariser discusses some of the dangers of the online filter bubbles we all are parts of.  While we as Americans tend to value terms such as democracy, inclusion, and diversity, the web is, and has been, using algorithms to give us information.  This means we are all living in different worlds, keeping us from having a shared sense of reality and we are getting what others think we “want” to see, but maybe not what we “need” to see.  This divisiveness is potentially dangerous to our democracy and even the idea that we are “united” as states of America.  As you watch, think through the values that are important to him that he says as violated by algorithms.

Final Paper Video Options

For the Communication Notebook Final paper, you will be required to use and cite two of the following videos.  They are divided by theme, and here is a list of the themes covered:

Principles of Effective Communication:

Principle 1 – Taking responsibility – 1) Why lying matters; 2) The power of truth

Principle 2 – Shared meaning – Creating a shared world through conversation

Principle 3 – Multiple views – Disagreeing

Principle 4 – Respect – 1) Living shame-free; 2) Inclusion

Principle 5 – Listening – How to have a good conversation

Principle 6 – learning and practice – Effective digital conversation

Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Communication:

There are five videos on the following topics – The power of personality; social media and mental health; building self-confidence; introversion; and building self-esteem.

Culture

1) Verbal and nonverbal cues: language and though; linguistic prejudice, nonverbal communication in intercultural contexts.

2) Race and ethnicity: Overcoming biases; focusing on similarity over differences;

3) Social class: On being tribes.

4) Gender: gender and credibility; gender, communication and the brain; and gender and different styles.

5) Miscellaneous: First impressions; how to get along with different generations; the secret to better work; and the value of empathy and vulnerability.

Principles of Effective Communiction

Principle 1 – Take responsibility for your behavior

Option 1: Why lying matters

Meyers, P.  (2011, July).  The truth about lying [Video file].  Ted.com. https://www.ted.com/talks/pamela_meyer_how_to_spot_a_liar?referrer=playlist-5_talks_on_the_truth_about_lyi

Description:  Author Pamela Meyer studies those who “spot lies” and complicates our understanding of lying.  As you watch, see how she addresses the social element of lying, thus linking it to interpersonal communication.  In fact, she even says we must cooperate on some level to be lied to!  Why does she believe telling the truth is so important?  What “responsibility” do we have as receivers to be aware of liars and our weaknesses toward certain types of lies?

Option 2: The power of truth telling

Carter, C. (2017, March 24).  The power of truth telling [Video file].  TEDx: Thatcher School. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cgywq8sQxMo

Description: In this talk, Dr. Christine Carter addresses how important telling the truth, to both oneself and others, is central to human health and happiness.  While truth-telling is accepted as a cultural “norm” and a central value to most people, she explores the deeper importance of telling the truth.  Pay special attention to subtle ways she addresses both interpersonal and intrapersonal communication and the idea of authenticity and its relationship to truth.

Principle 2 – Shared meaning

The Ling Space. (2016, January 13).   How do we create a shared world in conversation?  Common ground [Video file].  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gQqXmhqM13U

Description: Linguist Moti Lieberman explains the importance of finding common ground and how it allows communication to be smoother and easier.  Pay attention to his idea of backchannel responses specifically and how we can use common history or common knowledge to break the ice and connect with others.

Principle 3 – Acknowledge multiple views 

Wood, Z. R. (2018, April). Why it’s worth listening to people you disagree with [Video file].  TED Talks.  https://www.ted.com/talks/zachary_r_wood_why_it_s_worth_listening_to_people_we_disagree_with

Description: In this powerful speech, author Zachary Wood addresses the importance of having conversations with those with whom we disagree.  He is an advocate of having uncomfortable conversations as that allows us to “achieve progress” and “gain a deeper understanding of humanity.”

Principle 4 – Respect others as well as yourself

  1. Respect oneself and others

Thore, W. (2016, July 8). Living a shame-free life [Video file].  TEDx – Greensboro.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaXBYcfVYZM

Description:  In this speech by media personality Whitney Thore, she shares her story of self-acceptance of being fat.  Thore shares valuable information about both intrapersonal and interpersonal communication. She puts actions before confidence, rather than the reverse, supporting this week’s themes of self-image and self-esteem.

  1. Inclusion

Castleberry-Singleton, C.  (2016, June 8).  The answer is dignity & respect [Video file].  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNoS8OuI-G8

Description: Activist Candi Castleberry-Singleton is an advocate for inclusion, in all settings.  As you watch, consider how this is linked to Bevan’s points on respect and acknowledging multiple views.

Principle 5 – Listen and evaluate the other person’s statement before responding

Headlee, C.  (2015, May 7).  How to have a good conversation [Video file].  TEDx – Creative Coast.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6n3iNh4XLI

Description:  Journalist Celeste Headlee offers advice about the importance of genuinely listening and says that it is important to acknowledge that communication involves both a speaker and a hearer.  We must learn to listen to understand, not just to reply.

Principle 6 – Learn and Practice your communication skills

Morris-Brown, H. (2016, February 1).  The psychology of communicating effectively in a digital world [Video file].  Ted Talkshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3aPaRWUqO-w

Description: While Bevan focuses on being appropriate and effective, in this presentation Helen Morris-Brown explains how to be an effective communicator in the online world specifically.  Does this relatively new form of communication require new rules or is enough to transfer the cultural guidelines of the face-to-face world?

Interpersonal/Intrapersonal Communication

Option 1 – Personality

Little, B.  (2016, February).  Who are you really?  The power of personality [Video file].  Ted Talkshttps://www.ted.com/talks/brian_little_who_are_you_really_the_puzzle_of_personality

Description: In this speech, psychologist Brian Little addresses the impact of personality types and being introverted and extroverted specifically.  As you watch, pay attention to the ways he links introversion and extroversion to specific ways of thinking and communicating.  How can you relate this to the ideas of self that were addressed in Bevan?

Option 2 – Is social media hurting your mental health?

Parnell, B.  (2017, June 22).  Is social media hurting your mental health? [Video file]. Ted Talkshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Czg_9C7gw0o

Description: In this presentation, digital marketing expert Bailey Parnell addresses many themes covered in Bevan, including the importance of social comparison, how we judge our own self-worth, and what social media might be doing to our ideas of self.  Discuss those connections when you do your post.

Option 3 – The skill of self-confidence

Joseph, I. (2012, January 13).  The skill of self confidence [Video file].  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-HYZv6HzAs

Description: Here, athletic Director, Dr. Ivan Joseph explores the importance of positive self-talk and the relationship between intrapersonal and interpersonal communication and self-esteem.  As you watch, think through how it illustrates points from Bevan.

Option 4 – On Being an Introvert

Cain, S. (2012, February). The power of introverts [Video file]. Ted.com. https://www.ted.com/talks/susan_cain_the_power_of_introverts.

Description: Often maligned, in this presentation, author Susan Cain addresses the strengths of introverts and how they get through in the world. This is a good primer for next week on culture, as you will see that the dominant culture celebrates extroversion. Think of the ways that she “accommodated” others in her cultural choices. As you watch, think through how she discusses a bias against introversion and why it is both unfair and unproductive. How can this be seen through styles of communication she mentions?

Option 5 – Building self-esteem

Everett, N. (2013, February 8). Meet yourself: A user’s guide to building self-esteem [Video file]. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOrzmFUJtrs

Description: Activist Niko Everett addresses the importance of “practicing” self-confidence, including the use of positive self-talk. She explores the relationship between interpersonal and intrapersonal communication and even mentions the looking glass mentioned in Bevan.

Culture

Verbal and nonverbal cues

Option 1 – Language and Thought:

Boroditsky, B.  (2017, November).  How language shapes the way we think [Video file].  TEDWomenhttps://www.ted.com/talks/lera_boroditsky_how_language_shapes_the_way_we_think

Description: This video explores the ways language shapes patterns of thinking, from assigning blame to categorizing color.  Cognitive scientist Lera Borowotski explains that thought is likely impossible without language and it structures our sense of reality. As you watch, think about the links between language and values, traditions, and norms.

Option 2 – Linguistic prejudice:

Lieberman, M.  (2014, November 12).  Sociolinguistics and dialects [Video file].  The Ling Space. http://www.thelingspace.com/episode-11.

Description: Linguist Moti Lieberman explains the idea of dialects and contends that all are equal, from a scientific position.  However, through class, age, region, religion, or other factors, some can frame theirs as superior or “proper,” while others are not (a type of prejudice).  This is true of African American Vernacular English specifically.  As you watch, think about whether one should be strategic about how they speak in different contexts to achieve their goals.

Option 3 – Nonverbal communication

Riccardi, P.  (2014, October 21).  Cross cultural communication [Video file].  TED X – Bergenhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMyofREc5Jk

Description: An Italian who lived in England and then moved to Norway discusses the many cultural differences he has witnessed.  As you watch, focus on the ways he addresses nonverbal cues specifically.

Race and Ethnicity:  

Option 1 – How to overcome our biases? Walk boldly toward them.

Myers, V. (2014, December 15).  How to overcome our biases?  Walk boldly toward them [Video file].  TED: Beacon Street.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYyvbgINZkQ&feature=youtu.be&t=833

Description: In this video, diversity advocate Verna Myers suggests we make three changes to adjust our attitudes about black men specifically.  First, we should counter the negative images that surround us with positive.  Second, we should expand our horizons.  And third, when we see something, we should say something.  As you watch, think through the moments when she addresses perception, attitude, and behavior.

Option 2 – Focusing on similarity over difference:

Nimenya, S.  (2016).  We are not all that different: Race and culture identity [Video file].  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8QuAok_Xiyg&t=338s

Description: Activist Seconde Nimenya addresses the idea of “difference” specifically, and how it intersects with race and ethnicity, especially in the United States.  She chooses being better over being “bitter.”  This allowed her to try to create bridges between cultures.  Pay close attention to what she says about the idea of “difference” and how cultural training focuses on difference can lead to stereotypes and biases.  She shares three strategies for how we can use to celebrate difference as a value to achieve tolerance and peace.

Social class

Alvarez, L. & Kolker, A.  (2001, September 23).  Episode One: A nation of tribes [Video file].  People like us.  The Center for New American Media, WETA, and Independent Television Series.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nU5MtVM_zFs

Description: In the United States, most people envision that we are classless or that almost everyone is “middle class.”  But social class does exist and is not just based on income we make, but also influences how we speak, how we move and the hobbies we enjoy.  Here we learn how social class subtly divides us into “tribes” and unites us within those units as well.  When you watch, think about the role of both verbal and nonverbal cues in this classification system and the ways people talk about others.

Gender

Option 1 – Gender and Credibility

Chemaly, S. (2015, July 28).  The credibility gap: How sexism shapes human knowledge [Video file].  TEDx: Barcelona Womenhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJqtUUDhaxA

Description: Professor Soraya Chemaly argues that sexism structures the world.  As you watch, consider the ways implicit bias might be linked to biased language.  Focus on the verbal and nonverbal elements and how culture structures both our ideas, knowledge, and our lives. Think about the idea of credibility specifically and how this is linked to the principles of effective communication addressed in week 1.  This leads to different experiences for women or men.

Option 2 – Gender, communication, and the brain

Scott, S. (2014, July 31).  Men, women and language – a story of human speech [Video file].  TED: UCL Womenhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iteK4P0nDO8

Description: Neuroscientist Sophie Scott disputes many of the claims others have made about how gender impacts patterns of communication.  After discussing the complex process for even making language, Scott explains that we all use conversation as a type of “social grooming” and that men and women do it equally.

Option 3 – Gender and Different Styles

Nelson, A.  (2014, April 30).  A paradigm for understanding how men and women communicate [Video file].  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ooc5pOrYP24

Description:  Communication specialist Audrey Nelson addresses discusses some basic differences between men and women speaking patterns.  Specifically, she outlines how women tend to be more indirect and men more direct, that men are more goal-oriented and women more process—oriented, men are more content-oriented and women are more feeling-oriented, and men are more self-oriented and women more other-oriented.  Think of how these are connected to Bevan’s points.

Miscellaneous:

Option1 – First impressions

Cabane, O. F. (2011, November 24).  The science of first impressions [Video file].  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_zRZ5j2O07w

Description: Writer and coach Olivia Fox Cabane explains the ongoing importance of first impressions has not gone away.  She addresses the importance of visualization, imagination, and showing interest in others.  As you watch, think about how might you apply some of the advice she offers on workplace relationships or making an “impression” at work.

Option 2 – Intergenerational communication

Donohue, M.  (2016, December 13).  How to get along with Boomers, GenXers and Millennials [Video file].  TEDX Torontohttps://youtu.be/RtDxPcQ8GJg

Description:  Scholar Mary Donohue explores the role of generational categories in styles of communication.  She sees boomers as focused on legacy and are geared toward auditory exchanges, gen-Xers are seen as builders and are focused on the visual, and Millennials are adapters and adopters.  She offers advice about how to address generational differences.  Look to see if you see any links to Bevan on intergenerational communication.

Option 3 – The secret to better work

Achor, S.  (2012, February 1).  The happy secret to better work [Video file].  TED Talkshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLJsdqxnZb0

Description:  In a reversal of logic, positive psychologist Shawn Achor emphasizes that we should be happy then work, not that we should try to become happy as a result of work.  What might this mean in terms of our patterns of intrapersonal or interpersonal communication?  So, instead of thinking that success leads to happiness, we must think of how happiness leads to success.  Is your job satisfaction (happiness) determined by your external world or your internal processing of your work?

Option 4 – Values – The value of empathy and vulnerability

Brown, B. (2010). The power of vulnerability [Video file]. TEDxHouston. https://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability?referrer=playlist-when_you_re_having_a_hard_time

Description: Storyteller-researcher Brene Brown explores the idea of empathy and how it is fundamental to positive relationships. Connecting to others is at the center of her speech and we do this through both verbal and nonverbal communication. The opposite of connection is shame. Watch her speech to hear more about how to overcome shame, be compassionate, and connect to others. Much of this involves being vulnerable. Can vulnerability lead to healthier relationships? Watch her speech to see if you agree.

Communication Notebook

This is the form you will use to record all of your weekly exercise notes.  In weeks 1, 2, 4 and 5 you will update this document with the new exercise you complete.  You only have to answer three questions, through week 4.  Then, in week 5, you will be required to complete questions two for each week’s exercise.  You will be required to use Bevan, one course reading from the required or recommended list, and TWO course videos.  See the resources box for the week 5 paper instructions for a list of videos, but you can use any from class.  They should all be listed in a reference list at the end of this document and they should all comply with APA style guidelines.

Week 1: Channels of Communication

Speak to two people in two different ways – 1) via phone or video chat and 2) through email, messenger, or phone texting. You will ask them the same set of questions and discuss the same topic – their birthday or vacation plans. You will ask them the following questions:

  • What are you doing for your birthday or next vacation?
  • What did you do last year?
  • What do you want as a gift or what do you want to do while on vacation?
  • After your interaction, answer the following questions in the Week 1 Step 1

Step 1 – Describe the findings. (100 to 150 words) – Only this part is due at the end of week 1

 

  1. How much time did each exchange take (roughly)? (1 to 2 sentences)

 

  1. How well were the questions answered via phone or video chat? (1 to 2 sentences)

 

  1. How well were the questions answered via email, messenger, or phone texting? (1 to 2 sentences)

 

  1. How close did you feel to the person in the phone or video chat exchange? (1 to 2 sentences)

 

  1. How close did you feel to the person in email, messenger, or phone texting exchange? (1 to 2 sentences)

 

  1. Which interaction was most satisfying and why? (1 to 2 sentences)

 

 

 

Step 2 – Apply what you have learned during this class, especially the basic principles of effective communication, ideas of the self, or culture, to your exercise results, citing at least two course resources to support you and one must be a video.  (This must be 200 to 250 words.) Due week 5.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 2:  Please list your exercise: Stereotypes

As we have learned in Bevan, we use perceptual schemas to make sense of the world around us. These are central to communication, as they involve perception (taking in information into our minds through observing verbal and nonverbal cues), classification (putting information into categorical boxes in our minds), and then assigning meaning to those classifications, which are typically positive or negative.  In this option, you will explore a broad category of schemas called “stereotypes.”  To complete the task, do the following, using and citing Bevan as much as possible:

 

Step 1 – Describe the findings. (100 to 150 words) – Due week 2

 

  • Define stereotypes, utilizing Bevan.
  • Explain how stereotypes are useful tools we use to make sense of the world and make choices.
  • Identify three common stereotypes and write a sentence that draws on them.
  • Explore why each stereotypical sentence can be destructive.
  • List some steps we can take to mitigate the negative impacts of stereotypes

 

 

 

Step 2 – Apply what you have learned during this class, especially the basic principles of effective communication, ideas of the self, or culture, to your exercise results, using and citing at least two course resources to support you and one must be a video.  (This must be 200 to 250 words.) Due week 5.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 4:

Please list your exercise: Relationship Maintenance

  • Take a moment to evaluate one of your own relationships or the relationship of someone close to you.
  • What types of positive relationship maintenance behaviors related to communication outlined in chapter 8 in Bevan are used in this close relationship?
  • What different communication techniques are used in different types of relationships?

Step 1 – Describe the findings. (100 to 150 words) – Due week 4

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2 – Apply what you have learned during this class, especially the basic principles of effective communication, ideas of the self, or culture, to your exercise results, using and citing at least two course resources to support you and one can be a video.  (This must be 200 to 250 words.) Due week 5.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Week 5:

Please list your exercise: Relationship equity

 

  • Report on a time when you felt you were in an unbalanced relationship.
  • Did you feel under benefited or over benefited?
  • Based on what you have learned in Bevan, what are some specific verbal and nonverbal messages or behaviors you might use to restore equity in a close relationship?
  • How would you use different messages or behaviors if you were under benefited versus over benefited?

Step 1 – Describe the findings. (100 to 150 words) – Due week 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2 – Apply what you have learned during this class, especially the basic principles of effective communication, ideas of the self, or culture, to your exercise results, using and citing at least two course resources to support you and one can be a video.  (This must be 200 to 250 words.) Due week 5.

 

 

Communication Notebook Branden Pusch Com 200 Interpersonal communication Instructor: Joan Golding June 15th, 2020
1
Week 1: Channels of Communication
Step 1 – Describe the findings. I decided to call my sister on the phone and ask her the question for this part. It takes her about 30 minutes to answer my questions that I asked her. The first question I asked her if she was very descriptive on the phone. The second question I asked if she really wasn’t sure how to answer it because she doesn’t really have a lot of money to go anywhere. The third question I asked her if she was very descriptive on what she wanted to do and how she wanted to do everything to be done. My husband agreed to answer the questions in the text message. He just didn’t understand why I was asking these questions to him. I am very close to the person on the phone. We talk everyday about everything that happens in the day. It’s hard to feel close to somebody when you’re texting them questions. It’s kind of hard to know what their reaction really is through a text message. I think the reaction I was most satisfying for me was talking to my sister on the phone about these questions. I think the reason talking on the phone is so satisfying is because you could hear the reaction in my sister’s voice. I know she understands where she was coming from when she was answering these questions for me. It’s hard to get a
2 satisfying reaction through text messages with my husband because he doesn’t really talk much to begin with.
Step 2 So far I have learned that some people have trouble with communication. So far I have learned that some people have trouble with communication. As I’ve been learning in this class, the effect of communication is like texting or chatting. I’ve also learned using those programs can cause you to lose your nonverbal cues or even your verbal cues with somebody because I don’t pay attention to you. Was video chatting or even texting you can’t tell the tone of voice that somebody’s trying to get across through those platforms so it makes it hard to know if anybody is even actively understanding what you’re saying. I know when you’re video chatting it’s hard to catch the nonverbal cues because there is no change in her voice. I know when I video chat with somebody I try to pay attention and look them in the eye to make sure they understand me. II know when I was talking to my sister on my phone she got outside and I even made it hard for me to know what to say next because I didn’t know what she was thinking. When people get silent on the phone it’s hard to tell what’s going through their mind because you can’t see their verbal or non-verbal communications. This is why I think everybody should work on their nonverbal communication as well as their verbal communication cues so that way they can talk face-to-face versus talk to you not a video chat or over the phone or in a messenger it makes it too hard to understand what you’re doing at least for me. With us living in a world that face-to-face communications a way to do it you’re definitely losing the communication. I know it’s very easy to lose communication with someone else.
3
Week 2: Option 1: Violate a nonverbal cultural normal
Step 1 – Describe the findings. When I was walking down a busy street I waved to everyone I saw. I know some people would wave back others would just give you dirty looks. When I sat down in the store people just gave me dirty looks or asked me to move. I think that’s the best reaction or got out of anybody in the store I was in. The Norms are followed into different places together and are generally called folkways. There are four different kinds of norms and they are folkways, mores, formal norms, and informal norms. This is just a different way to classify social order in people. The Norms beliefs are basically the same because they go to work and they pay bills and they have a family. My values are somewhat different but almost the same. I think it connects to haptics because it talks about nonverbal cues in communication. I have learned to watch for nonverbal communication. I’ve learned to keep in contact and have good posture when I’m talking to somebody. So that they know I’m listening to them talk to me about everything. “Both verbal and nonverbal messages reflect your social background and heritage, as well as the experiences, beliefs, values, attitudes, and role expectations supplied by your dominant culture and the co-cultures that are important to your identity. The language that you learn and use in
4 your everyday communication with others is culturally bound, as is the nonverbal communication that you use or do not use.”(Bevan,2020).
Step 2 I think when it comes to verbal and nonverbal Communications I don’t think people realize that they use them all the time or even at all. I know my husband doesn’t even realize he uses body language to tell me stuff or nonverbal communication. My kids like to use their body language to tell me what they want because I don’t like to talk to anyone or anything. “When you come into contact with people from other cultures, you cannot assume they will encode and decode messages the same way you do—their perceptual filters have been structured differently from yours. Indeed, the cultural, social, and historical context in which the message occurs must be considered to increase the likelihood that meaning will be shared” (Hall, 1976). I didn’t know there was so much to learn about nonverbal and verbal communications. “Americans also frequently make direct eye contact with their conversational partners, whereas members of a number of Asian cultures shy away from direct eye contact, believing that eye contact can be disrespectful.”(Bevan,2020). I think making direct eye contact with somebody shows respect and shows him that you’re listening. I also know having good body language and posture and being able to talk clearly to somebody else is also good communication. I think there’s many forms of
5 communication people use in order to show other people there listening or paying attention I think that helps keep the communication open.
Week 4:
Please list your exercise: Option 3: Relationship Maintenance
Step 1 – Describe the findings. My husband and I have been together 15 years. We have built a relationship on trust and loyalty and being able to have her rapport for each other. I don’t think we had a single fight through the whole time I’ve ever been together. I know we do spend a lot of time talking to each but right now because he had to go out of state for a job. I know our relationship has been really hard with him being in another state and not being able to find work. With my relationship we try to keep a positive outlook on life which helps us stay positive. I know having a positive relationship really helps keep communications open with family. I know during the early years we were together we had some challenges communicating and being able to talk to each other about are feelings. I know most of the fights were about how to manage money or how to take care of kids.
6
Conflict management ​: using constructive and positive behaviors such as cooperating, listening, and apologizing when in conflict or disagreements with the partner. (Bevan, 2020). I know with my relationship we went through this stage of conflict management through the years a lot more than I care to admit.
Positivity ​: being optimistic, cheerful, pleasant, not criticizing your partner, and showing affection and appreciation for the other person and the relationship.(Bevan, 2020). I do my best to be as positive as I can in my relationship with my husband because that is the best way to be in a relationship with everyone.
Step 2
Relationship maintenance behaviors ​ are the actions, messages, and tasks that assist with maintaining, managing, or repairing a relationship (Burleson, Metts, & Kirch, 2000). These behaviors and messages are conscious and strategic and specifically involve how to define and establish the parameters of the relationship and manage the tensions and threats to therelationship’s integrity and existence (Burleson et al., 2000; Stafford, Dainton, & Haas, 2000). I think establishing that you have a relationship is a good start as well as figuring out but tensions you have between each other or what threatens our relationship to ending. I know my husband and I have figured out how not to fight in front of our kids because we disagree on certain things which helps make our relationship stronger. Are they having good communication in a relationship and help to be able to talk to your partner about the kids or about anything. Keeping open communication let’s everybody understand they can talk to one another so that they can help each other with whatever problems they have when they have them. Communication is
7 everything in a relationship you don’t have. It’s really hard to maintain a relationship especially if you have kids in that relationship for what not even animals. I think my husband and I have a really good relationship because we have open communication. We talk to one another all the time, that is when I can get him to talk to me.
Week 5:
Please list your exercise: Option 1: Social support
Step 1 – Describe the findings. I know I have been giving my husband social support with him getting a new job. I also give my sister social support. She talked to me about everything and I talked to her about everything. ​Social support ​ occurs when people who are confronting daily problems or major life stresses turn to others in their social network who can “provide information, comfort, perspective, and aid” (Goldsmith, 2004, p. 11); this act of social support then bolsters one’s ability to effectively cope and respond to the situation.(Bevan, 2020). I know I use a happy tone of voice when I talk to my husband. When we video chat it helps to be able to see his body language better so I can read his nonverbal cues he gives when we talk to each other. Yes it was appropriate for the situation when we were talking. I think it helps me learn more about nonverbal and verbal cues in my husband’s personality and how he acts with other people.
8
Step 2 I find it important to be able to read someone’s verbal and nonverbal cues in a relationship with somebody else. It also helps to have social support with your partner as well. “ ​Not only can social support help someone feel better emotionally and psychologically, this form of communication also benefits physical health and well-being.”(Bevan, 2020). I know that I show social support to my husband and to my sister. I help them by talking to them and listening to what they have to say. I also help them with their problems that they may have during the day. I know I will do my best to help make people feel happy and feel like they have all the social support they can have from me. I think I show my sister more social support because I talk to her like ten times a day if not more than that in a day. We talk about everything we can talk about. My sister is the one who got me back into college and gave me the encouragement I needed to be able to take the classes. She also helped me figure out what degree I wanted to do. So I do believe we have social support for each other every day. I do think having social support in your everyday life is the best thing you can have.
9
References Bevan, J. L. (2020). ​Making connections: Understanding interpersonal communication ​ (3rd ed.). Retrieved from ​https://content.ashford.edu/ Ketchum, C. (2016). ​Week 2 webinar – Culture in action (Links to an external site.) ​ [Video file]. Retrieved from https://ashford.mediaspace.kaltura.com/media/Week+2+Webinar+-+Culture+in+Action/0_7 4gfapck Legrand, T. (2011, November 22). ​A failure to communicate (Links to an external site.) ​ [Video file]. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=80x5LhUSBE TEDx Talks Non-Verbal Communication | Leyla Tacconi | TEDx British School of Brussels

 

 

Communication Notebook 1
Communication Notebook
Student’s Name
COM200: Interpersonal Communication
Instructor’ Name
Date
.
Communication Notebook 2
Week 1: Channels of Communication
Step 1 – Describe the findings. (100 to 150 words) – Only this part is due at the end of week 1
I chatted with two of my co-workers – one through messenger and the other through video chat –
asking about when their last vacation was. Neither has ever taken a real vacation before. The
messenger communication was dry and had negligible content- just a simple answer to a simple
question without the influence of nonverbal feedback via tone, inflection or facial expression. In
the video chat, our ability to communicate nonverbally made the relational dimension much
stronger and created a more detailed dialogue. What Bevan (2020) refers to as mediated channels
become apparent considering the similarity of the question and answers, and different responses
due to the inability to convey those nonverbal cues.
The text communication was about five minutes long due to waiting for responses and external
distractions. The video chat was shorter because it was handled much like a face to face
interaction – no distractions from outside sources, and lots of nonverbal feedback through
expression and tone to enhance our dialogue.
Both people answered the questions clearly, however, the one via SMS was lacking content due
to a lack of feedback. I was able to laugh and giggle during the video chat and change the context
of the message significantly.
The messenger content was straightforward, to the point – almost dry. This conversation was
also based on shared knowledge of each other’s situations, what Bevan (2020) refers to as
“relational dimension.”
I felt much closer over the phone. My nonverbal communication set the intent for this to be a
positive, happy conversation – and changed the context. We had an exciting discussion about her
dream vacation to Disney and what that would mean for her son.
This conversation ended up being a little more one-sided on the receiver’s part because I didn’t
influence the context. The conversation ended up being more related to how tired and frustrating
it can be not to have a way to get away for an extended period.
The face to face interaction was much more satisfying because of added elements through
nonverbal communication.
Step 2 – Apply what you have learned during this class, especially the basic principles of
effective communication, ideas of the self, or culture, to your exercise results, citing at least two
course resources to support you and one can be a video. (This must be 200 to 250 words.) Due
week 5.
Effective communication is always limited when texting, video chats, etc. cause mediation.
Losing nonverbal cues such as tone and facial expression changes the context or meaning of the
conversation. To compensate, we rely on what Bevan (2020) describes as the “primary goal of
human communication,” shared meaning. Shared meaning enhances mediated dialogue by
relying on rapport and self-disclosure.
Commented [KC1]: Nice point. You mentioned inflection,
tone, and facial expression earlier. It would have been great
to restate some of those points here.
Commented [KC2]: Good point about how it changes the
experience for both parties. I wonder if that contributed to
“shared meaning.”
Commented [KC3]: Be sure to explain specialized terms
like that. In addressing that concept, Bevan explains the
importance of power, how well the two parties get along,
and feelings. Those are all important.
Commented [KC4]: I struggled a bit to follow this point. It
seems maybe you’re saying there is more “sharing” when it
is live?
Communication Notebook 3
During my previous conversation in messenger, the context was changed by the closeness of our
relationship. Healthday News (2011) states close friends may stop taking in all the details and
lose perspective of the conversation because there is so much prehistory to influence the context
of a simple question. As the messenger, Bevan (2020) reminds us that we are responsible for
clearly, accurately communicating to the receiver, no matter the channel. To mitigate
miscommunication, we need to encode our responses by tailoring them to the communication
styles of the receiver.
In a world where face-to-face communication is rapidly becoming less common, the odds are
against successful communication. Headlee (2015) warns that we are more polarized and divided
than ever before. Through heightened awareness of our communication skills, we can find shared
meaning in a platform devoid of gestures, tone and facial expressions.
Week 2: Please list your exercise: ___ Stereotypes ___
Step 1 – Describe the findings. (100 to 150 words) – Due week 2
Bevan (2020) describes stereotypes as fixed opinions or preconceptions based on expectations
rather than facts. It is quite natural for humans to categorize and assign characteristics to
individual based on common representations, and those assumptions are often useful in helping
us communicate more effectively.
Examples of stereotypes:
1) Old people don’t understand technology.
o Old folks can’t understand computers, so I always try to spend more time helping them and
answering simple questions, so they are more confident. Just because someone is older doesn’t
mean they can’t use modern tech. This assumption can cause offense and lead to missing out on
valuable input grounded in years of experience.
2) The Jones boy was raised out in the sticks, and it will be easy to play a joke on him because he
won’t catch on.
o Upbringing and surroundings don’t indicate limited intelligence, and bullying can alienate and
cause mental anguish.
3) Don’t believe anything he says; he’s just a kid!
o Assuming that children aren’t truthful can lead to abuse and neglect.
To avoid assigning what DiMaggio (1997) describes as default stereotypes, we need to:
1) Be aware of if our surroundings. Are we being influenced by another’s ideas? 2) Be active
observers and listeners. Search out what makes the interaction unique.
Step 2 – Apply what you have learned during this class, especially the basic principles of
effective communication, ideas of the self, or culture, to your exercise results, using and citing at
Commented [KC5]: This is a nice final point as it is
important to be aware of this so one can adopt different
measures to convey tone. 😊😊
Commented [KC6]: Good point. The older person might
have worked in the early years of computing and still keeps
up!
Communication Notebook 4
least two course resources to support you and one can be a video. (This must be 200 to 250
words.) Due week 5.
Is a stereotype an ugly, outdated expression? Or is it simply social categorization, the natural
phenomenon that occurs when we subconsciously assign individuals to social groups (Stangor,
2014)? In answer, it can be both. Bevan (2020) describes stereotypes as necessary and organize
sensory input. By sorting individuals based on similar characteristics, our brains don’t have to
work as hard to give us useful information about our surroundings.
Stereotypes help us discern people of similar interests and tastes. In the video “A Nation of
Tribes,” stereotypes are referenced as a social class system, dividing people by religion,
education, income or hobbies, often subconsciously. While this seems counter-intuitive to the
American cultural standard of equality for everyone, it is a natural occurrence due to natural
human desire to interact with people who share a similar cultural identity. Whenever we can
share “cultural norms, values and traditions,” barriers typically in place dissolve quickly and
easily, creating instant rapport and belonging (Bevan 2020).
Negative stereotypes lead to an evident lack of respect through unwillingness to appreciate
natural differences. While it is appropriate to associate with people that you like and respect, it is
not appropriate to allow a stereotype to dictate how we behave through biased jokes and
offensive sexist or racial slang. Bevan (2020) reminds us that failure to respect differences can
negatively impact professional reputation through an evident lack of judgment.
Week 4:
Please list your exercise: _Relationship Maintenance
Step 1 – Describe the findings. (100 to 150 words) – Due week 4
My husband Roger and I have been together for almost 10 years. We built our relationship on a
foundation of trust and instant rapport based on similar upbringing and many shared interests.
We continue to build on that foundation with what Bevan (2020) describes as crucial behaviors
and communication, or relationship maintenance.
During the early years, we had our challenges – mainly getting used to the idea of being only
children and sharing. Some of our biggest fights happened because I moved something 6 inches
to the left, or I thought he sounded like my mother.
Conflict management: there is a time and place for every conversation. Roger doesn’t bring up
argumentative topics while I’m on my way to work. Whenever I’m upset about something he’s
done, I give myself plenty of time to think it through and find a logical approach.
Openness: trust can’t be held without a level playing field. We share successes, mistakes,
frustrations, you name it. There are no passwords that I don’t or can’t have, no locked doors that
he can’t open.
Commented [KC7]: Good point. So, we need to just be
aware of when this might be harmful to ourselves or others.
Commented [KC8]: Interesting. I wonder what the root of
those two points of contention is. 🙂
Commented [KC9]: It would have been even stronger to
cite Bevan and cover a specific point from her.
Communication Notebook 5
A relationship can be how well I work with my boss, or how often I call my mom. Bevan (2020)
refers to definitions of relationship maintenance as overlapping and applicable to a variety of
relationships.
Step 2 – Apply what you have learned during this class, especially the basic principles of
effective communication, ideas of the self, or culture, to your exercise results, using and citing at
least two course resources to support you and one can be a video. (This must be 200 to 250
words.) Due week 5.
To be meaningfully involved in intimate interpersonal communication can be one of the most
personally fulfilling experiences of being alive. Brene Brown (2010) describes it as feeling
connected: it’s how we are wired, why we’re here. Building and maintaining any relationship is
an effort based on the very core of our being. Being vulnerable, open, and trusting is
instrumental in achieving a level of complete rapport and self-disclosure suited to a long-lasting,
intimate relationship.
Ideally, we will “focus on positive behaviors to maintain a relationship (Bevan 2020)”. However,
the reality of conflict is almost always present in some shape or form throughout a long-term
relationship. Negative behaviors such as avoiding an upsetting or time-sensitive topic or
attempting to control the relationship can cause irreversible damage if left unchecked. Stafford
and colleagues (2000) describe conflict management as using constructive and positive behaviors
such as listening and apologizing to repair damages.
Sometimes, Relationship maintenance isn’t as simple as fixing a communication issue or saying,
“I’m sorry.” According to Vuchinich (1990), 66% of dinnertime family conflicts agreed to
disagree. Further, repetitive, unresolved conflicts such as serial arguments can increase
relationship dissatisfaction (Cramer, 2002). In situations like these, it’s essential to be involved
in and actively looking for ways to effectively resolve conflict if the approach didn’t work the
first time.
Week 5: Please list your exercise: _Relationship equity_
Step 1 – Describe the findings. (100 to 150 words) – Due week 5
In my role as an assistant supervisor, I was underbenefited much more often than overbenefited.
There was always an imbalance in how the role was described- a few supervisor/ assistant teams
as equal co-supervisors – others very much “boss” and subordinate. True to Bevan’s (2020)
example, I often felt hurt, resentful and dissatisfied because I was always over extended and
scrambling to meet all my daily tasks when I was in the latter combination.
As I look back at this experience, I let my lack of communication skills get in the way. Bevan
(2020) mentions uncertainty management as a waxing and waning of interpersonal
communication based on the relationship or even our self-concept. My self-concept and inability
to trust was impactful, allowing me to sell my abilities short and not be assertive over my own
rights.
Commented [KC10]: Nicely put, as you highlight the
connection between rapport and self-disclosure and how
they are crucial to sustaining meaningful relationships.
Commented [KC11]: I’d like to have seen you list just a
few here.
Commented [KC12]: Good point. Just a bit more detail
about your role and how specifically you felt under
benefited would have helped me better understand the
scenario.
Communication Notebook 6
Step 2 – Apply what you have learned during this class, especially the basic principles of
effective communication, ideas of the self, or culture, to your exercise results, using and citing at
least two course resources to support you and one can be a video. (This must be 200 to 250
words.) Due week 5.
A relationship is a partnership between two people and each half of that partnership has the basic
need to feel rewarded (Bevan 2020). Each half of the relationship measures its value based on
self-perception, expecting a different reward. As an assistant supervisor, my reward was to be
appreciated by my supervisor, loved by my team and instrumental in helping drive performance.
The reward for the supervisor is to have all daily tasks completed and see team performance
excel. Though different, those separate tasks can be equally rewarding if each partner fulfills
their own responsibilities and communicates needs clearly to the other party.
Bringing equity back to a relationship can have many different challenges, particularly when
people with very different conflict styles are involved. Competent communication used to
express thoughts and emotions constructively is key to any attempt to regain balance (Bevan,
2020). Actively listen, be engaged, focused and present, in the moment (Headlee, 2015).
Through this heightened level of engagement. you can learn their conflict style to better engage
in dialogue and restore balance.
Often, inequalities or imbalances in a relationship are based on a mutual loss of trust or failure to
communicate clearly. By assuming we have something to learn, we can regain that lost ground
and rebuild trust by providing a collaborative response to conflict. Instead of showing a high
concern for ourselves and aggressively defending our position, we can attempt to create a winwin situation by reaching a mutual decision that benefits both halves of the relationship (Bevan
2020).
Commented [KC13]: Good point. I hope to see you
explain the idea of equity a bit more.
Commented [KC14]: This is a bit better, but the idea
could have been developed more, with Bevan used to
support you.
Commented [KC15]: Good general point, but I struggled
to see what this win-win would look like for your example.
Try to make those links between examples and course
themes whenever possible.
Communication Notebook 7
References
Headlee, C. (2015, May 7). How to have a good conversation. TEDx – Creative Coast.

HealthDay News. (2011, January 24). Close relationships sometimes mask poor communication
(Links to an external site.). Retrieved from http://health.usnews.com/health-news/familyhealth/brain-and-behavior/articles/2011/01/24/close-relationships-sometimes-mask-poorcommunication
Brown, B. (2010). The power of vulnerability. TEDxHouston. Retrieved July 14, 2019 from

Bevan, J. L. (2020). Making connections: Understanding interpersonal communication (3rd ed.).
https://content.ashford.edu/
Commented [KC16]: All the details are in the correct
order, following APA guidelines. Two small corrections are
to ensure the reference list items are alphabetized, by last
name and to indent the second line. To do this second task,
right click on the text in word and go to the section that says
“Indentation.” From the menu items, select “Special” and
then scroll down and click “Hanging.”
Commented [KC17]: To comply with new APA style
guidelines, please omit the “Retrieved from” information.
Just FYI – we are working on making changes to the course
shell and correcting any errors on those references lists.
Commented [KC18]: Omit.

 

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