final project/draft(environment and natural resource

This is the last step of the final project .It is due in 30 hours,on 12/06/2020.Need to write 8-10pages and its follow the topic I have chosen and wrote about it: Water Crisis in America

I have done the last two assignments((project description and  progress report),the final draft need to organized them use them to write the essay.Below have the details instructions and files.

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ESPM 50 – Final Project Fall 2020

Project Options: Choose from the following final project (FP) options. All options are designed for a

total of 25-35 hours of project-related work per student in teams or individually.

Project Coordinators: Each FP option will have one or more instructors designated as project

coordinators, who will lead workshops, grade and give feedback on papers, and serve as key project

consultants for students. See the project option sheets below for specific project coordinators.

Final Project Workshops: Most FP options require synchronous workshops, as indicated on the FP

option sheets. Please do not select an option for which you will be unable to attend the workshops.

Table of Contents

General Information

Project Option Summaries………………………………………………………….2

Final Project Registry, bCourses Submission, and Titling Information…………….3

Project Resources……………………………………………………………………4

 

Research, Documentation and Communication

Option 1A (O1A): Individual paper …………………………………………………………………………………..7

Option 1B (O1B): Policy Brief …………………………………………………………………………………………8

Option 1C (O1C): Journalism ………………………………………………………………………………………….10

Option 1D (O1D): Website Development …………………………………………………………………………12

Option 1E (O1E): Podcast or Video …………………………………………………………………………………15

 

Education

Option 2A (O2A): DeCal Course Development …………………………………………………………………18

Option 2B (O2B): K-12 Curriculum Development …………………………………………………………….20

Option 2C (O2C): ESPM 50AC Module Content Development…………………………………………..22

 

Engagement

Option 3 (O3): Community Partner Organization Engagament .………………………………24

 

Independent Project

Option 4 (O4): Independent Project ………………………………………………………………………………..25

 

 

 

 

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ESPM 50 – Preliminary Final Project information Fall 2020

 

You may choose from the following final project (FP) options (O1A, O2A, O3, etc.). Each option is

designed for students to engage in a total of 25-35 hours of project-related work individually or in

teams.

Project Option Summaries

Option 1: Research, documentation and communication

• O1A: Individual paper. Write an 8-10 page paper on almost any topic addressing a course-

related theme in the United States or in an area of U.S. imperial influence.

• O1B: Policy brief. Write a policy brief on a contemporary “environmental issue” at the local,

state and/or federal level, focusing in part on the social justice dimensions of the issue.

• O1C: Journalism. Write a journalistic article on the environmental and social dimensions of

a contemporary issue, ideally in the Bay Area or California.

• O1D: Website Development. Work with a team to develop a Google Site on historical and

contemporary social and environmental issues.

• O1E: Podcast or Video. Produce a 5-10+-minute podcast or video on a topic related to ESPM

50 themes.

 

Option 2: Education

• O2A: DeCal course development. Develop a DeCal course for Fall 2019 or Spring 2020,.

• O2B: K-12 Curriculum Development. Develop educational materials for K-12 students.

• O2C: ESPM 50AC Unit Content Development. Develop educational materials for use by

future ESPM 50AC students in a new or existing course learning Unit or for Discussion

Sections.

 

Option 3: Engagement: Work with a community partner organizations on a research, advocacy or

other project designed primarily by the community partner:

 

 

Option 4: Independent project. This is an opportunity to develop your own final project related to

course content and themes. There are many possibilities, including, but not limited to the following:

• Develop an environmental campaign

• Start a sustainability initiative

• Apply for funding for an environmental or social justice project for yourself or an organization.

• Prepare an individual or group independent study project for Fall 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Project elements and submission: Projects will have the following elements, due dates and point values, with the exception of some engagement projects, which will require earlier registration

and may have a flexible final draft submission due date:

Sub-assignment Due date Grade value

1) Project Description F (10/2) on bCourses by 10pm 10 points (-20 if no submission) 2) Progress Report Su (11/15) on bCourses by 10pm 40 points

3) Final Draft Su (12/6) on bCourses by 10pm 200 points

 

 

Final Project Registry

In addition to submitting a Project Description on bCourses (as described below on this page and in the

FP option sheets), each student must register their project on the Final Project Registry.

FP Early Registration for O3, community partner organization engagement FPs only: 10p, M (9/21).

• Register your interest in an FP O3, Community Partner Engagement project in the FP Early Registry.

• FP Community Engagement Workshop: If you register for an FP O3, you should attend a required FP workshop, 6-7:30p, T (9/29) (Zoom link). Please see the FP O3 assignment sheet

for the Zoom link. If you are unable to make it to the workshop, a Zoom recording will be

posted.

• Unregistering: If, after the workshop, you decide to not move forward with the community engagement project, please notify us by FP Early Deregistry by 10p, M (9/28).

 

FP Registration: register your project in the FP Registry by 10p, F (10/2).

• Individual projects: Each student doing an individual project must register their project.

• Team projects: Each team project must be registered separately by each team member.

• Project title: You must include your project title when you register. All team members must use the exact same title in the registry.

 

Final Project Workshops: All FP options except O1A and O4 require workshop attendance. Please do not register for a project option if you cannot attend the workshop or view a recording of the

it within a few days after it is offered.

 

Final Project assignment submissions

• Each individual or each team member must submit a copy of all project assignments (i.e., Project Description, Progress Report and Final Draft).

• Late submission: 20% will be deducted from late submission of all assignments. Assignments won’t be accepted more than a week after due dates, unless approved by a project coordinator.

 

Final project file and document titling

File titling: Title all submission files as follows: “Project option (space) dash (space) first five words

of project title (space) dash (space) your last name, first name (space) dash (space) S’19” (e.g., O1A –

Moral and Legal Questions of Complicity – Pence, Mike – F’20).

Document Titling: On the front page of each assignment include the following:

• Full project title: Top center of page, bolded 12-point font.

• Author name(s): Top right, alphabetically ordered

• Date: Top right

 

 

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• Project option type (e.g., O1B: Policy Brief): Top right

ESPM 50 FP Resources:

See the FP Module in bCourses for these useful resources.

• FP Option sub-folders: You can access these folders in the Files Tool>Syllabus and Assignments>Final Project. They contain useful resources appropriate to different project

types and examples of high quality assignment submissions from previous semesters.

• “Getting started and following through on your final project”

• Annotated bibliography guidelines

Research and writing resources:

• The UCB Library offers appointments for undergrads doing research assignments.

• Williams, Joseph M. and Gregory B. Colomb. Style: Lessons in Clarity and Grace. Longman, 2010. This is a great resource for all writers!

• Richard Lanham’s video “Revising Prose” is a great resource for writing clearly and succinctly. • MLA citation guidelines

• Zotero citation management software. It’s free!

• Students who want support and feedback about writing are encouraged to seek editorial help with their papers from other students, the Student Learning Center (SLC), their GSI, and other

resources!

Types of sources

• Scholarly, peer reviewed academic journals and academic press books: These are your o to sources for any academic project to situate your questions and research in the academic

literature. Every EXPM 50 Final Project should include these types of sources!

• Creative arts: literary, visual, dramatic, musical, and electronic arts, etc.

• Primary sources: historical newspapers, documents, diaries, maps, material sources, etc. • You are encouraged, but not required, to use both primary and secondary documents as

sources. For a description of primary and secondary sources, see:

http://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/subject-guide/163-Finding-Historical-Primary-Sources

• Popular press materials: newspaper and magazine articles (e.g.: New York Times, The Washington Post, The Nation, Scientific American, Time, Newsweek, etc.).

• Web-based resources: You may use exclusively web-based resources in addition to the five required references, not as one of these references. Be aware of the range of quality and

veracity of electronic information. Do not use Wikipedia as a referenced source!

• Do not primarily use brief, non-scholarly, web-based sources such as newspaper articles, brief descriptive articles, etc. One or two may be useful, but these are not appropriate as the

key sources for an academic assignment such as this one. If you have any questions about this,

please check with your project Coordinator or GSI. • For guidelines on evaluating sources, see: http://guides.lib.berkeley.edu/evaluating-resources

 

Writing Help

Students who want support and feedback about writing are encouraged to seek editorial help with their

papers from other students, the Student Learning Center (SLC), their GSI, and other resources! The

SLC is in the Golden Bear Center, off Lower Sproul Plaza. Richard Lanham’s video “Revising Prose”

offers useful advice on writing clearly and succinctly.

 

 

 

 

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Final project ideas: These can apply to almost any FP Option.

Nature, Society and Culture: ESPM 50 addresses how social, natural and cultural systems influence

and are shaped by natural resource management. Whatever topic you choose, you should consider

some aspect of interaction between at least two of these three systems in specific contexts and/or as a

subject of scholarly discourse.

 

Specificity and precision: Precisely specify times, places, people groups and events in your project.

Avoid over-generalization and vagueness.

 

Topics: We encourage you to focus on topics associated with California, the Bay Area and particularly

the East Bay. However you may focus on any historical and/or contemporary topic that is primarily

concerned with the U.S. (including areas of U.S. foreign policy influence). DO NOT select an topic

that is primarily outside of the US.

 

Frameworks and themes: Here are some ways you can structure many of the project options:

• Place and ecological change: Explore the interaction of people and specific places. Explain how different management approaches and resource use strategies have shaped landscapes and changed

ecosystems. Conversely, examine how geophysical and ecological factors have shaped resource

use by different groups. Or focus on the importance of a specific place or ecosystem to shaping

social systems and ideas. •

• Resource management: Examine approaches to resource management and specific practices by an individual or group, or compare resource management by different individuals, groups, interests or

parties within a group. Explore the role of ideology, the state, cultural traditions, social

organization, etc. in shaping resource management histories and practices. •

• Natural resource access, control and use: Focus on one of the following themes to understand struggles over resource control, access and use:

• Property: Discuss how one or more groups have defined land and property rights and how this has influenced their ability to control resources and resource management.

• Politics: Examine interest group ideas, tactics, strategies, positions and dynamics concerning a specific natural resource management issue.

• Power relations: Discuss how power relations and policy affect resource management.

• Identity: Examine resource management and cultural identity, heritage and practices. Consider ideas, ideology and the social construction of Nature and the Other.

• Domination and resistance: Discuss the expropriation of natural and cultural resources by dominant groups. Consider the importance of cultural identity in resisting domination.

• Economy: Focus on how economic factors affect resource management. •

• Institutions, policy and law: Focus on the historical development and implications of specific institutions, policy and law governing resource management.

• Resource manager decision-making: Consider why resource managers make decisions as individuals and groups and how these decisions impacts ecosystems and social systems.

 

• Environmental or social justice issues: Explore the drivers of and possible solutions to a specific issue, by examining underlying environmental and social justice histories.

 

 

• Case study: Examine one group, time period and place. Ideally, your case study should be representative of and allow you to analyze a larger issue. Or compare two cases.

• Literature review and commentary: Describe and analyze key scholarly ideas and debates.

 

 

 

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Bibliographical Resources

 

UCB Libraries: More important than searching online is actually going to the stacks and consulting

with a reference librarian at any number of libraries on campus:

• Moffitt

• Doe

• Biosciences

• Ethnic Studies

• Environmental Design

• Bancroft & Bancroft Library. Digital Collections

Online article databases: You may need a library vpn number to access electronic resources from off

campus.

• Googling sources may be a good first step, but you need to go deeper!

• JSTOR: JSTOR is a digital library that provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals, as well as books and other resources.

• Web of Science: With the Web of Science platform, you can access an unrivalled breadth of world-class research literature linked to a rigorously selected core of journals and uniquely

discover new information through meticulously captured metadata and citation connections.

 

California archives:

• Online Archive of California: The Online Archive of California is an initiative of the UC California Digital Library. It contains many collections.

• Calisphere: Calisphere provides free access to unique and historically important artifacts for research, teaching, and curious exploration. Discover over one million photographs,

documents, letters, artwork, diaries, oral histories, films, advertisements, musical recordings,

and more.

• California Historical Society: The California Historical Society, founded in 1871, is a nonprofit organization with a mission to inspire and empower people to make California’s

richly diverse past a meaningful part of their contemporary lives.

• California State archives: The California state Archives provides a repository for the state’s permanent governmental records as well as other materials documenting California history.

• California Digital Newspaper Collection: The California Digital Newspaper Collection contains over 1,500,000 pages of significant historical California newspapers published from

1846-present.

• Found SF: San Francisco’s Digital Archive

• SF/Bay Area Television Archive

East Bay archives:

• East Bay Express archive

• Edible East Bay archive

• East Bay Times archive

• Berkeley Daily Planet archive

• SF Bay Guardian archive

• Daily Cal print archive

Zotero: This is a great free citation management and document archiving resource for any project. We

highly recommend that you register, download the app, and use it to manage your FP citations! For

more information, see https://www.zotero.org/ and the Zotero information sheet in the FP resources

folder on bCourses.

 

 

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Option 1A (O1A): INDIVIDUAL PAPER • Individual. 8-10 pages (not including images and bibliography)

• Project Coordinator: Your GSI

Assignment: Write an 8-10 page paper (excluding images and bibliography) on almost any topic

addressing a course-related theme in the United States or in an area of U.S. imperial influence. You

are encouraged, but not required, to focus on the Bay Area or California.

Resources: See “Getting started and following through”, annotated bibliography guidelines, and

example papers in the FP folder on bCourses.

Sub-assignment Due date Grade value

1) Project Description F (10/2) on bCourses by 10pm 10 points (-20 if no submission) 2) Progress Report Su (11/15) on bCourses by 10pm 40 points

3) Final Draft Su (12/6) on bCourses by 10pm 200 points

 

1) Project Description: A brief paragraph summarizing your paper subject area, topic and

preliminary question(s) that you will use to formulate a thesis.

2) Progress Report:

A. Project Overview:

• Key question: A (re)iteration of your central question • Thesis statement: A succinct, precise thesis statement addressing your key question

• Paper outline specifying the contents of each paragraph, including: o Complete topic sentences for each anticipated paragraph o Supporting sentences: At least 2 descriptive phrases that specify the content of

your supporting sentences. Complete sentences are not required.

B. Task and Resource Inventory: This can be presented as a bullet point list, spreadsheet or table.

• Description of work completed.

• Description of planned tasks and timeline.

• List of resources that you have on hand and plan to acquire to research and write your paper.

C. Annotated Bibliography: Write at least five annotations, four of which must cover peer reviewed

articles or (chapters from) academic press books. You may also annotate primary texts and art

works, if appropriate to your project. Do not annotate websites, blogs or newspaper articles.

*See “Annotated bibliography guidelines” in the bCourses Final Project folder.

 

3) Final Draft: You may take any number of creative approaches to the form and content of your

paper, but most students will present and argue for a thesis. If you choose another approach, please

discuss this with your GSI.

Citations and bibliography: Quotes, information and ideas from books, readings or lectures must be

cited using MLA style parenthetic citations. All references also must be listed in a bibliography using

MLA style. See the MLA style guide in the FP Resources on bCourses. You must include at least

seven sources, five of which must be either peer reviewed articles or (chapters from) academic press

books. You may also annotate primary texts and art works, if appropriate to your project.

Format:

• 8-10 pages

• 1.5-spaced

• 12-point font

• 1” margins.

• File and front page titling (see p. 2)

• Use no cover sheet

 

 

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Option 1B (O1B): POLICY BRIEF • 2-4 persons. 1000-1,500 words per person. No individual projects.

• Project Coordinators: o Christian Jordan <cjordan@berkeley.edu>. Office hours: Wednesdays 9-11am, Zoom Link

o Robert Shortt <robert_shortt@berkeley.edu>. Office hours: Thursdays from 2-4pm . Zoom Link.

Assignment: Write a policy brief addressing a contemporary “environmental issue” at the local, state

and/or federal level, ideally focusing in part on the social justice dimensions of the issue.

Resources: See the FP folder on bCourses for student and professional policy brief examples, support

materials, and annotated bibliography guidelines.

Team submissions: Each team member should submit the same assignment files (e.g., the same

Project Description) individually on bCourses.

Required workshops: T (10/20), 6-7:30p & T (11/17), 6-7:30p.

Sub-assignment Due date Grade value

1) Project Description F (10/2) on bCourses by 10pm 10 points (-20 if no submission) 2) Progress Report Su (11/15) on bCourses by 10pm 40 points

3) Final Draft Su (12/6) on bCourses by 10pm 200 points

 

1) Project Description: A brief paragraph summarizing your paper “issue” and a bullet point

preliminary overview of relevant policies, laws, government agencies, affected groups, etc. This may

be quite general at this point. For instance, if your “issue” is water quality in Strawberry Creek, you

may identify the Clean Water Act, the City of Berkeley, and Berkeley students.

2) Progress Report:

A. Project Outline: Submit an outline of your policy brief, including a summary of key relevant

existing policies and/or your policy “prescription” (means of addressing the issue(s) and/or

implementing a solution to problems that you identify). Be sure to consult examples of policy

briefs to get ideas for how to structure your brief (see below for information and links). You have

some latitude here, but should include the following:

• Key issue(s) statement: Precisely summarize the issue(s) of concern.

• Background information: Summarize pertinent background information, being as precise and specific as possible. For instance, if you are working on fracking in California, identify

relevant areas of the states in which fracking is or may be practiced in the future.

• Existing policy context assessment: Identify and preliminarily assess (in terms of strengths and limitations) existing policy regarding your “issue” at the federal, state and/or local level, as

appropriate for your project. If you have not developed a clear assessment of existing policies

at this point, push this as far as you can. Please be aware that there may be laws, policies, etc.

that affect your issue “indirectly”. You will need to decide where to draw the lines in terms of

which of these you want to include.

• Your policy prescription: If you are proposing a policy prescription to the issue, summarize this. If you are not, explain why this is so.

• Conclusions: Describe any conclusions you anticipate making. These may focus on barriers and pathways to implementing possible policies, forecasted outcomes, etc.

• Graphical imagery: Either include as preliminary graphics or describe, as far as possible, the contents of any graphical content that you intend to include.

• Summarize the contents of each paragraph, including:

• Topic sentences for each anticipated paragraph: Complete sentence required.

• Supporting sentences: Description the content of your supporting sentences.

• Anticipated references: Use parenthetic MLA reference form.

 

 

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B. Task and Resource Inventory: This can be presented as a bullet point list, spreadsheet or table.

• Description of work completed.

• Description of planned tasks and timeline.

• List of resources that you have on hand and plan to acquire for your project.

• If each person in a team assumes a role or roles in the project in terms of research, project

administration, editing, writing specific sections, etc., identify each team member role.

C. Annotated bibliography: Each team member should write three annotated bibliography entries, two

of which must be either peer reviewed articles or (chapters from) academic press books. You may

also annotate primary videos, podcasts, texts and art works, if appropriate to your project. Do not

annotate websites, blogs or newspapers. Focus on explaining how each reference may support your

project. See “Annotated bibliography guidelines” in the FP folder on bCourses.

*Sources concerning related or analogous topics: If you can’t find enough material directly

concerning your topic and/or if you want to supplement sources directly related to your topic, you

may use sources that pertain to related or analogous topics or provide background / contextual

information including policy briefs concerning environmental and social issues.

 

3) Final Draft: Bring it all together here. Include graphics as appropriate.

• Cover sheet: Your cover sheet should include paper title, team member names, the date, and your GSI’s name.

• Content: See examples below for ideas about content.

• Format: You may use any professional looking, appropriate format, including your choice of font, spacing and margins.

• Citations and bibliography: Quotes and ideas from books, readings or lectures must be cited using MLA style parenthetic citations. All references also must be listed in a bibliography

using MLA style. See the MLA style guide in the FP Resources on bCourses.

 

What is a policy brief? A policy brief provides a succinct, targeted explanation of an issue that can be quickly read and easily digested by a decision-maker. It is a concise summary with

recommendations aimed at policymakers, hence the shorter word count. Writing in a succinct style is

very challenging because you have to pay attention to every single word in every sentence. The short

word count doesn’t mean it will be easy!

You may write one of two types of policy brief:

• Advocacy brief: Analyze a problem and argue in favor of a course of action using evidence.

• Objective brief: Assess a set of proposed or existing policies and give balanced information for policy makers to make informed decisions.

 

How should a policy brief be organized? See these links for policy brief tutorials: • Johns Hopkins School of Public Health: https://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-

institutes/womens-and-childrens-health-policy-center/de/policy_brief/index.html

• University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill: http://writingcenter.unc.edu/policy-briefs/

• Wesleyan University: https://politicalscienceguide.com/home/policy-paper/

• Research to Action: https://www.researchtoaction.org/wp- content/uploads/2014/10/PBWeekLauraFCfinal.pdf

• *See the Policy Brief Resources folder on bCourses for templates.

Policy brief examples & resources: See the Policy Brief Resources folder on bCourses for examples of student and professional policy briefs and other resources.

 

 

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Option 1C (O1C): JOURNALISM • 1-3 persons. Length varies.

• Project Coordinators: o Tiffany O’Dwyer <tmodwyer@berkeley.edu>. Office hours: Tuesdays 12-1 and Thursdays 3-4. o James Carney <jamescarney@berkeley.edu>. Office Hours: Tu: 4-5pm PST, W: 2-3pm PST: Zoom link

 

Assignment: A journalistic story on the environmental and social dimensions of an issue.

 

Resources: See the FP folder on bCourses for project examples and annotated bibliography guidelines.

Required workshops: Th (10/22), 6-7:30p & Th (11/19), 6-7:30p.

Sub-assignment Due date Grade value

1) Project Description F (10/2) on bCourses by 10pm 10 points (-20 if no submission) 2) Progress Report Su (11/15) on bCourses by 10pm 40 points

3) Final Draft Su (12/6) on bCourses by 10pm 200 points

1) Project description: A brief paragraph summarizing your story topic.

 

2) Progress Report:

A. Pitch plan: Pitch your story to your editor (actually your GSI) in no more than 300

words. See here for pitching stories:

• https://training.npr.org/audio/what-makes-a-good-pitch-npr-editors-weigh-in/

• https://ijnet.org/en/resource/how-pitch-story-ideas-tips-journalists

• https://www.genprogress.org/how-to-write-a-pitch/

B. Project Outline: Write an outline of your story. Include the following:

• Lead sentences for each anticipated paragraph: Complete sentence required.

• Supporting sentences: At least 2 descriptive phrases that specify the content of your supporting sentences. Complete sentences are not required.

 

C. Task and Resource Inventory: This can be presented as a bullet point list, spreadsheet or table.

• Description of work completed.

• Description of planned tasks and timeline.

• List of resources that you have on hand and plan to acquire for your project.

• If each person in a team assumes a role or roles in the project in terms of research, project

administration, editing, writing specific sections, etc., identify each team member role.

D. Annotated bibliography: Each team member should write three annotated bibliography entries, two

of which must be either peer reviewed articles or (chapters from) academic press books. You may

also annotate primary videos, podcasts, texts and art works, if appropriate to your project. Do not

annotate websites, blogs or newspapers. Focus on explaining how each reference may support your

project. See “Annotated bibliography guidelines” in the FP folder on bCourses.

 

3) Final Draft: Write a story on an issue that encompasses environmental and social subjects.

• You do not need to use in-text citations, per journalist conventions, but you should include an MLA format bibliography of works from which you have drawn to write your article.

• Include images as appropriate.

• Format: Include text and images as appropriate. Length varies, but typical stories are 1500- 2000 word per person. 1.5 spacing with 12-point font and 1” margins. The top of page 1

should include story title, your name, the date, and your GSI’s name. Use no cover sheet.

 

 

 

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Journalistic writing style: Writing a journalistic story for a newspaper or magazine draws on

different generic traditions and styles than the writing style associated with academic papers.

Before beginning your project, visit the Purdue site below, and some of the following sites.

Purdue University Library:

• Journalistic Writing: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/735/01/

• AP Style: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/735/02/

• The Inverted Pyramid: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/735/04/

• Writing leads: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/735/05/

Also see:

• Handbook of Journalism: http://handbook.reuters.com/index.php?title=Reporting_and_Writing_Basics

• Journalistic Writing: http://www.peoi.org/Courses/Coursesen/mass/mass5.html

Examples of environmental journalism:

• The Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/us/environment

• High Country News: https://www.hcn.org/

• Orion Magazine: https://orionmagazine.org/

• New York Times. Dot Earth. http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/

• Environment 360: http://e360.yale.edu/

• China Dialogue: https://www.chinadialogue.net/

• Earth Journalism Network: http://earthjournalism.net/

On Environmental Journalism:

• Maxwell T Boykoff. We Speak for the Trees. Media Reporting and the Environment http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/pdf/10.1146/annurev.environ.051308.084254

• Peter Dykstra. Environmental Health News. Analysis: Environmental journalism reaches middle age, with mixed results

http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/news/2016/sept/environmental-reporting-analysis

• “Worlds Apart: How the Distance between Science and Journalism Threatens America’s Future.” First Amendment Center (download a free copy from freedomforum.org under “publications”):

http://www.newseuminstitute.org/wpcontent/uploads/2016/10/worldsapart.pdf

• Society of Environmental Journalists: http://www.sej.org/

• Martin Wright. Solutions the Way Forward for Environmental Journalism: https://www.positive.news/2016/environment/22132/whats-store-environmental-journalism/

 

WWF:

• Environmental Journalism and its challenges: http://wwf.panda.org/wwf_news/?158642/Environmental-journalism-and-its-challenges

• Recommendations on Environmental Journalism. http://wwf.panda.org/wwf_news/?158643/Recommendations-on-environmental-journalism

 

Planning and organizational resources:

• KQED Media Making Toolkit: https://ww2.kqed.org/quest/media-making-toolkit/

• Media Planning Worksheet: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lTNlXRFguePOGTRhKpI2CncRiyLfXOIF8iCoRL3NLHg/e

dit

 

 

 

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OPTION 1D (O1D): WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT • 1-4 persons. Length varies

• Project Coordinators: o Laura Belik <laurabelik@berkeley.edu>. Office Hours: W 8-9am/ 10-10:30am, Zoom Link o Rina Priyani <priyani@berkeley.edu>. Office Hours: Open office hours: F 2-3:30pm: Zoom link

 

Assignment: Develop a website using Google Sites (or other web design platform) on a specific topic

addressing a course-related theme in the United States. Your site will be one of many that we hope to

develop as resources for students to use in developing future projects inside and outside of ESPM 50.

IOf you choose to do this FP option, you must are to allow future students to build upon your work,

and develop the website further.

Sites should include the following:

• Home page with topic summary and links

• Thematic pages with substantive essays on sub-topics (at least one thematic page and a total of 1200-2000 words per team member).

• Links to external resources (and brief description of the linked websites or other resources).

• On-campus and off campus resources pertinent to the topic

• Bibliographical resources and annotations

• Etc.

Resources: See here for project examples.

 

Expanding on existing Google Sites: Former ESPM 50AC students agreed to have future students

continue to develop their sites. You are encouraged to consider building on an existing Google Site

developed by a former ESPM 50 student or team. Take a look at the examples, and consider how you

could substantively expand upon the content of and improve the site. If you choose to do this, you

must list the title and url of the site in your Project Registration and Project description. You should

also consult with the project coordinator and/or Kurt about how to proceed. This can be a great

opportunity to contribute to a larger project that can be a useful resource for future students. And

please be aware that the time commitment of 25-35 hours per student is the same for this project as for

all other.

 

Required workshops: Th (10/22), 6-7:30p and Th (11/19), 6-7:30p.

Sub-assignment Due date Grade value

1) Project Description F (10/2) on bCourses by 10pm 10 points (-20 if no submission) 2) Progress Report Su (11/15) on bCourses by 10pm 40 points

3) Final Draft Link pdf Su (12/6) on bCourses by 10pm 200 points

3a) Project Summary Su (12/6) on bCourses by 10pm part of Final Cut grade

1) Project Description: A brief paragraph summarizing the focus of your site. Be as specific as

possible. For instance, rather than developing a site on “Climate Change”, narrow your focus to

something as specific as “Climate adaptation politics in Oakland” or “Sea level rise and climate justice

in the East Bay”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

2) Progress Report:

A. Project Overview: A summary of your site content, including the following:

• Key issue(s): A (re)iteration the key issue(s) that you will be covering • Thematic categories: A succinct, precise description of key thematic sub-topic pages that you

intend to include on your site. For instance, if you are developing a site on Punjabi

immigrants in California agriculture, you may want to have separate pages for “immigration”,

“settlement communities” and “field labor”, etc. Specify these thematic categories here.

• Site outline: specifying the contents of each web page within the site.

B. Task and Resource Inventory: This can be presented as a bullet point list, spreadsheet or table.

• Description of work completed.

• Description of planned tasks and timeline.

• List of resources that you have on hand and plan to acquire for your project.

• If each person in a team assumes a role or roles in the project in terms of research, project

administration, editing, writing specific sections, etc., identify each team member role.

C. Annotated bibliography: Each team member should write three annotated bibliography entries, two

of which must be either peer reviewed articles or (chapters from) academic press books. You may

also annotate primary videos, podcasts, texts and art works, if appropriate to your project. Do not

annotate websites, blogs or newspapers. Focus on explaining how each reference may support your

project. See “Annotated bibliography guidelines” in the FP folder on bCourses.

 

3) Final Draft:

Content: There are many ways to develop a website, but you should include each of the following, as

appropriate for you project, and in consultation with the Project Coordinator.

• Home Page (with topic summary)

• Thematic sub-topic pages (with brief summary statements) o Introduction summary of key issues o Bibliography o Annotations o Resources

• Online resources o Websites o Videos o Archives o Databases o Other

• Timeline of key events and publications related to the topic (if applicable)

• Maps (if applicable)

• General On-campus and off-campus resources (if applicable) o Faculty and grad students working in the field (include websites and relevant

publications)

o Organizations o Archives o Databases o Etc.

• Anything else that is pertinent (check project coordinators)

 

 

 

 

14

3A) Final Project Summary: Include the following:

• A 1 page description of the final product(s) that you generated for the project.

• A pdf of any original content that you created for the project.

• A bullet point list of the tasks and number of hours you engaged in each specific task.

Design: We will discuss options in the first project workshop.

 

Resources:

• Examples of student-designed Google Sites: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1wCGMNOdKLR4uK-uBvKg5EY1N4W4SFrfB

• Google Sites tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnwvpalIv4w

• Getting started with Google Sites: https://sites.google.com/site/mflynchsites/

• UW Library Tutorial: http://depts.washington.edu/trio/trioquest/resources/web/google.php

• Google Sites design resources: http://www.googlesiteswebdesign.com/p/resources-and- links.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Option 1E (O1E): PODCAST & VIDEO • 1-4 persons

• Project Coordinators: o Jamon Franklin < jamonfranklin@berkeley.edu>. Office Hours: Th 11-11:45. Zoom Link o MaFe Gonzalez <mafegonzalez@berkeley.edu>. Office Hours: Wednesdays 12:-2. Zoom Link

 

Assignment: Produce a 5-10+-minute podcast or video on a topic related to ESPM 50AC themes.

This can be “documentary” or “creative”. A documentary project should offer a “factual”

representation of reality, but may have an artistic point of view, a message of some sort, and a moral or

ideological ambition. Consult with the Project Coordinator and/or Kurt regarding appropriate content.

Resources: See here for examples.

 

Required workshops: W (10/21) 6-7:30p, & W (11/18) 6-7:30p, OR Th (10/22) 6-7:30p, & Th (11/19) 6-7:30p.

Sub-assignment Due date Grade value

1) Project Description F (10/2) on bCourses by 10pm 10 points (-20 if no submission) 2) Progress Report Su (11/15) on bCourses by 10pm 40 points

3) Final Draft Su (12/6) on Google Drive by 10pm 200 points

3a) Reflective Essay Su (12/6) on bCourses by 10pm part of Final Cut grade

 

1) Topic paragraph and preliminary question(s): A brief paragraph summarizing your film or

podcast topic and preliminary question(s) and/or themes that you will use to formulate a narrative.

2) Progress Report:

A. Project outline: Include a storyboard, an argument/thesis statement and an outline

Storyboard: A storyboard helps you define and organize the parameters of a story within available

resources and time. Create a 5-7+ slide storyboard to organize your film or podcast using

PowerPoint. Each slide should include text describing the content of the slide and images (not

required for podcasts) that convey the types of cinematic themes/representation or podcast content

that you will portray. Also, include a title slide at the beginning and a credits slide at the end.

*For an explanation of how to create a storyboard and an example, see:

https://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu/tutorials/starttofinish-storyboarding/

Thesis statement / argument summary: Clarify your goal by writing a succinct, precise statement

or argument summary addressing your key questions(s), arguments, themes, etc.

Project outline: Describe the contents and goals of each storyboard slide. List at least one (ideally

three or more) points you will make for each slide in a bullet point description.

 

B. Task and Resource Inventory: This can be presented as a bullet point list, spreadsheet or table.

• Description of work completed.

• Description of planned tasks and timeline.

• List of resources that you have on hand and plan to acquire to for your project.

• Each team member should assume a role or roles in the project in terms of research, project administration, filming, editing, etc. Identify each person’s role(s) in the project.

• Identify all potential interview or character subjects by name and title.

C. Annotated bibliography: Each team member should write three annotated bibliography entries, two

of which must be either peer reviewed articles or (chapters from) academic press books. You may

also annotate primary videos, podcasts, texts and art works, if appropriate to your project. Do not

annotate websites, blogs or newspapers. Focus on explaining how each reference may support your

project. See “Annotated bibliography guidelines” in the FP folder on bCourses.

 

 

 

16

3) Final cut: 5-10+-minute podcast or video.

• Fair use Statement: Include a Fair Use Statement in credits at the end of videos. See the following for information: http://www.criticalmediaproject.org/about/fair-use-statement/

• File types: Save video and audio files in one of the following formats: .mp4, .mov or .wmv. Other possibilities are also available.

• Submission: Upload your final cut file to Google Drive HERE. Do not submit it to bCourses.

 

3a) Reflective essay & bibliography: Each team member should submit a one-page reflection on the

process of engaging in this project on bCourses. Describe your goals, greatest challenges, means of

addressing them, and what you learned from the process. In the same document, also submit a

bibliography of works used by the team in the project, including tutorials. Each team member should

include (paste) the same bibliography at the end of their Reflective Essay.

Guidelines: Edit, edit, edit!

• Begin with the title of your documentary or introductory statement describing your podcast

• End with credits

• Do not use more than 15 seconds of outside video at a time.

• Support any claims with substantial research.

• Be clear about your persuasive purpose—your position/claim.

• **Common-Sense Clause: Don’t put yourself, or others, in dangerous situations. Don’t show illegal activity or potentially incriminate others. Don’t use unsuitable images.

 

 

Resources

• Examples of student videos and podcasts: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1G3nzwxCWshq_3MA00SSugocacdVGK9a9?usp=sharing

 

Video

Software – I-Movie Suite: • I-Movie: Offers templates to create your film from beginning to end.

• Garage Band: Allows you to create multi-audio tracks. You can add your own recorded narration to these tracks, import music, create original music, and use sound effects.

• Motion: Offers many special effects.

• I-DVD: Allows you to format and burn your film to a DVD so it looks like a professional film with templates for scene selection, language selection, etc.

 

Software – PC Equivalents: • Window Movie Maker: Part of the software found on Microsoft Windows.

• PhotoStory: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=11132

Tutorials: • The UCB Graduate School of Journalism offers a wide range of tutorials at

https://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu/tutorials/

• Iphone Video Tutorial: https://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu/tutorials/shoot-edit-video-iphone/

• Garage Band: https://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu/tutorials/garageband-basic-editing/

• Google Map Basics: https://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu/tutorials/google-map-basics/

• IMovie: https://multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu/tutorials/imovie/

 

 

 

 

 

17

Planning tools: You should use the Script planning sheet!!! • Script planning spreadsheet for moving from storyboard to film:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1OqYWTFtGUL9UPtTDdFWENFv3OYNpzoBMc81KLRBru-

c/edit?usp=sharing

• Video Rubric: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1C3n-7y- PmUguIKsmw1vN9mCbngVMopePCgVEyYD2wAc/edit?copiedFromTrash

 

 

Podcast Resources • How to Start a Podcast: 7 Steps for Podcasting Beginners!

• How To Start A Podcast For Free: Complete Guide. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aup6AOsIg-Q

• Podcast Motor. Learn How to Create Killer Podcasts With 25 Free Audio Resources. https://www.podcastmotor.com/learn-how-to-create-killer-podcasts-with-25-free-audio-resources/

• Podcast 101. 40 Free Audio Resources to Help Make Your Podcast Sound Great https://medium.com/podcast-101/40-free-audio-resources-to-help-make-your-podcast-sound-great-

9731ea24c657

• Sullivan, Terry. How to Create Your Own Successful Podcast. PC Magazine. July 31, 2018. https://www.pcmag.com/article/362620/how-to-create-your-own-successful-podcast

• The Absolute Beginners Guide to Podcasting: Production. https://www.ostraining.com/blog/podcasting/production/

• Podcast Production: 10 Tips for Great-Sounding Audio. https://www.izotope.com/en/learn/products/ozone/10-tips-for-a-great-sounding-podcast.html

• 10 production mistakes podcasters make: 10 production mistakes podcasters make. https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/10-production-mistakes-podcasters-make-tap194/

 

 

18

Option 2A (O2A): DECAL COURSE DEVELOPMENT • 1-3 persons

• Project Coordinators: o Sarah Atkinson <satkinson@berkeley.edu>. Office hours: W 2-3pm, F 10-11am

o Kurt Spreyer <kspreyer@berkeley.edu>. Office hours; W, 11a-1p. Zoom Link

Assignment: ESPM 50 has spawned quite a few DeCal courses over the years. If you are interested in

developing a DeCal course for which ESPM sponsorship would be appropriate to teach in Fall 2021 or

Spring 2022, you can use the ESPM 50 Final Project as a launching pad. The deadline for submitting

materials for approval to offer courses in Spring 2021 is in early October, so it may be impossible to

teach courses in Spring 2021. However, if you are interested in doing this, please contact the project

coordinators!

Resources: See the FP folder on bCourses for example syllabi and lesson plans.

Teaching your DeCal: The goal is to develop a DeCal course that you will teach. Please enter into

this project with the intention of teaching the course in Fall 2021 or Spring 2022.

 

Required workshops: W (10/21), 6-7:30p & W (11/18), 6-7:30p

 

K-12 Environmental and Social Justice Education DeCal: On possibility for this FP Option is to

organize a DeCal course for Spring and/or Fall 2021 focusing on collaboration with ARISE High

School in Fruitvale, and potentially other schools, to develop curriculum, mentor students, and support

educators. There are many possibilities! Anyone who is interested in being part of a team to develop

this course as an O2A – DeCal Course Development Final Project for ESPM 50AC is encouraged to

contact Kurt to discuss the project.

 

Sub-assignment Due date Grade value

1) Project Description F (10/2) on bCourses by 10pm 10 points (-20 if no submission) 2) Progress Report Su (11/15) on bCourses by 10pm 40 points

3) Final Draft Su (12/6) on bCourses by 10pm 200 points

 

1) Project Description: Submit a summary of the course on bCourses, and in your Box folder. This

can be a preliminary syllabus, if you are at that stage, or it can be a more preliminary document, which

must include the following:

• Course title

• Summary of course content

Additionally, you are encouraged, but not required, to include the following:

• Summary of key learning objectives & outcomes

• Bibliography of works to be included in the syllabus

2) Progress Report:

A. Project outline and thesis statement: An outline/summary of your project, including an overview of

curriculum content, learning goals, pedagogical approach(es), etc. The format is flexible, but it is

important that you demonstrate that you have thought through a useful approach and are on the

track to developing a syllabus.

B. Task and Resource Inventory: This can be presented as a bullet point list, spreadsheet or table.

• Description of work completed by each team member

• Description of planned tasks and timeline by each team member

• List of resources that you have on hand and plan to acquire for your project.

 

 

19

C. Annotated bibliography: Each team member should write three annotated bibliography entries, two

of which must be either peer reviewed articles or (chapters from) academic press books. You may

also annotate primary videos, podcasts, texts and art works, if appropriate to your project. Do not

annotate websites, blogs or newspapers. Focus on explaining how each reference may support your

project. See “Annotated bibliography guidelines” in the FP folder on bCourses.

 

3) Final Draft: Include the following: 1) “Final” Syllabus, 2) “Final” lesson plan set, and 3) a list of

support materials used to develop the class, including articles, etc.

 

3A) Syllabus: Your syllabus should include the following:

• Course title

• Summary of course content

• Summary of key learning objectives and/or outcomes

• Grading policy

• Attendance Policy

• Bibliography of works to be included in the syllabus

• Description of course assignments

• Instructor contact information

• Indicate what students need to do to get a “P” in your course

• Accommodation statement

3B) Assignments: Describe in as much detail as possible the contents, due dates and learning

objectives of each assignment. Please note that you may want to set up assignments to be flexible, to

meet the needs and interests of your students.

 

3C) Lesson Plans (LPs): Develop the content of specific class meetings. At least one per team

member.

 

3D) Final Project Summary: Include the following in one pdf:

• A brief description of the final product(s) that you generated for the project

• A one page reflective essay on your experience developin the course

• A pdf of any original content that you created for the project.

• A bullet point list of the tasks and number of hours you engaged in each specific task.

Resources

Example Syllabi and lesson plans: See the FP Resources folder on bCourses.

DeCal information:

• https://nature.berkeley.edu/cnr-decals

• http://www.decal.org/start-a-course/

• http://www.decal.org/start-a-course/uc-policies/

• http://www.decal.org/

 

 

 

 

20

Option 2B (O2B): K-12 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT • 1-3 persons

• Project Coordinators:

o Kayla Cathers <kayla_cathers@berkeley.edu>. Office Hours: Tuesday 2:30-4. Zoom Link o Eric Peterson <ericpeterson@berkeley.edu>. Email for office hours

 

Assignment: Design a K-12 environmental and/or social justice education curriculum on any number

of topics, including climate, sustainability, food justice, etc. Typically, this will include a series of

lesson plans designed to deliver content on a specific topic or a set of topics.

 

Resources: See example lesson plans in the Final Project folder on bCourses.

 

If you are interested in refining and implementing your curriculum in local schools, you can work with

students developing the K-12 Environmental and Social Justice DeCal course to explore opportunities

in schools in Spring or Fall 2021. And, if you currently work with a K-12 school, please consider

ways to collaborate with them through your ESPM 50AC Final Project. We are happy to support

creative approaches!

 

Workshops: T (10/20), 6-7:30p & T (11/17), 6-7:30p.

 

Sub-assignment Due date Grade value

1) Project Description F (10/2) on bCourses by 10pm 10 points (-20 if no submission) 2) Progress Report Su (11/15) on bCourses by 10pm 40 points

3) Final Draft Su (12/6) on bCourses by 10pm 200 points

 

1) Project description: Describe your project in as much detail as you can at this point in terms of:

• Project title

• Lesson plan title(s)

• Summary of lesson plan content & learning objectives

• Target population

• Where you would hope to implement the curriculum (if applicable). Additionally, you are encouraged, but not required, to include the following:

• Bibliography of works to be included in the syllabus

• Description of course assignments

2) Progress Report:

A. Project summary and outline: A summary and outline of your project, including an overview of

curriculum content, learning goals, pedagogical approach(es), etc. The format is flexible, but it is

important that you demonstrate that you have thought through a useful approach and are on the

track to developing a syllabus.

 

B. Individual and team member roles and task inventory:

• Include a bullet point description of work completed for each team member.

• Include a bullet point description of planned tasks and timeline for each team member.

• Individuals developing a DeCal course should complete this part of the assignment.

 

 

 

 

 

21

C. Annotated bibliography: Each team member should write three annotated bibliography entries,

three of which must be either peer reviewed articles or (chapters from) academic press books. You

may also annotate primary videos, podcasts, texts and art works, if appropriate to your project. Do

not annotate websites, blogs or newspapers. Focus on explaining how each reference may support

your project. See “Annotated bibliography guidelines” in the FP folder on bCourses.

 

3) Final draft: Include the following:

• “Final” lesson plan set

• A list of support materials (articles, etc.) used to develop & support your lesson plans

Lesson Plans (LPs): Develop the content of specific class meetings.

3A. Your lesson plan should include the following:

• Title

• Summary of lesson content

• Summary of key learning objectives & outcomes

• Description of course assignments

• Description of assessment approach

3B. Final Project Summary: Include the following:

• A 1 page description of the final product(s) that you generated for the project.

• A pdf of any original content that you created for the project.

• A bullet point list of the tasks and number of hours you engaged in each specific task.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22

Option 3C (O3C): ESPM 50AC UNIT RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT • 1-4 person project.

• Project coordinators: o Sarah Atkinson <satkinson@berkeley.edu>. Office hours: W 2-3pm, F 10-11am o Cameron Lopez <cslopez1@berkeley.edu>. Office Hours: M 12-1:30 Zoom Link

 

This is actually something of a hybrid project. GSI Sarah Atkinson will coordinate development of

resources that can be used to support:

• Existing ESPM 50AC units

• Development of potential alternative ESPM 50AC Units for future semesters

• Development of resources for ESPM 50AC sections

• Many other possible projects that will contribute to the course

Students will work together with Sarah Atkinson to determine project content and format. The final

draft will be presented in the form of a Google Site, and associated material in Google Drive folders

created by students.

Required workshops: W (10/21), 6-7:30p & W (11/18), 6-7:30p

 

Sub-assignment Due date Grade value

1) Project Description F (10/2) on bCourses by 10pm 10 points (-20 if no submission) 2) Progress Report Su (11/15) on bCourses by 10pm 40 points

3) Final Draft Su (12/6) on Google Drive by 10pm 200 points

 

1) Project description: Describe your project’s content, location and learning objectives.

 

2) Progress Report.

A. Project summary and outline: Write a brief summary and outline of your project, including an

overview of content, learning goals, locations, materials available to students, etc.

B. Individual/team member roles, task inventory & resources:

• Include a bullet point description of work completed for each team member.

• Include a bullet point description of planned tasks and timeline for each team member.

• It is recommended (but not required) that each team member assume a role or roles in the project in terms of research, project administration, editing, etc. Identify these role(s).

• List and briefly (no more than a sentence or two) describe all resources that you have identified to use for your project (include the resources that you cite in your annotated bibliography by

title in a bibliographical list).

C. Annotated bibliography: Each team member should write three annotated bibliography entries,

two of which must be either peer reviewed articles or (chapters from) academic press books. You

may also annotate primary videos, podcasts, texts and art works, if appropriate to your project. Do

not annotate websites, blogs or newspapers. Focus on explaining how each reference may support

your project. See “Annotated bibliography guidelines” in the FP folder on bCourses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23

 

3) Final draft: Your final draft should include the following in two separate Word Docs, with any

additional support materials in pdfs or other appropriate file types:

A. Summary for instructors: Summarize the assignment for the ESPM 50 instructors (not to be shared with students who may do the XC assignment in a future semester). Include:

• A summary of the assignment (can be the same as or similar to the version below.

• A summary of assignment goals

• A list of support material / information that you did not include in the assignment, but may be useful as a resource for developing additional versions of the assignment (e.g., a website

with information about your topic, etc.)

 

B. Summary for students who will do the XC assignment in a future semester: Include:

• Assignment description: An overview/summary of the assignment

• Specific learning objectives: Please note that these can be broad, medium level and/or specific. See the first page of the ESPM 50 syllabus for examples of broad and medium

level learning objectives.

• Logistical information: include transportation information, hours of operation, etc.

• Assignment description/instructions: For instance, you may include a specific set of questions, worksheet(s), assignment instructions, etc. for students to complete.

o Examples include: treasure map, guided tour questionnaire, instructions to document a field trip by taking pictures and completing a worksheet, a specific way in which a

student might write an extra credit essay that differs from the generic ESPM 50 XC

assignment sheet description, etc.

• Support materials including the following, as appropriate: 1. Map(s) 2. Archival or other text and graphic resources, including website links 3. Relevant articles 4. Images 5. Anything else that might support the student experience

 

*Please note that, unless otherwise specified in your assignment description, all students who complete

your extra credit assignment will be expected to submit some form of generic XC essay as part of an

extra credit assignment, as described in the ESPM 50 XC assignment sheet. You are welcome to

assign a different form of submission for students, but, if you do, you must specify that the regular XC

essay is not to be submitted by students doing your xc assignment.

Format: Submit a Word Doc (not a pdf) of the final draft, etc. PDFs are fine for images and support

documents. Use 1.5 spacing with 12-point font and 1” margins. The top of page 1 should include

paper title, team member names, the date, and your GSI’s name(s).

 

 

 

 

 

 

24

Option 3 (O3): COMMUNITY PARTNER ENGAGEMENT

• Individual (students may work in teams, but should register individually) • Project coordinators:

o Lucy Andrews <lucyandrews@berkeley.edu>. Office Hours: by appointment o Katherine Wolf <katherinerosewolf@berkeley.edu>. Office hours: by appointment o Kurt Spreyer <kspreyer@berkeley.edu>. Office hours: W, 11a-1p.

Assignment: Work with a community partner organization (CPO) on a project that is designed

primarily by the CPO. The processes and outcomes are variable, but all projects require a commitment

to at least 25 hours of work with a CPO, plus time to write the project assignments. Pre-Registration: Complete the Pre-Registration Form by 10p, M (9/21).

Required workshops: T (9/29), 6-7:30p & 6-7:30p, T (10/27). Zoom link Sub-assignment Due date Grade value

1) Project Description F (10/2) on bCourses by 10pm 10 points (-20 if no submission) 2) Project Check in #1 F (10/16) – Project check in form #1 0 points

3) Project Check in #2 F (11/6) – Project check in form #2 0 points

4) Progress Report Su (11/15) on bCourses by 10pm 40 points

5) Final Draft Su (12/6) on bCourses by 10pm 200 points CPOs: Do not contact CPOs directly! Click HERE for detailed CPO and project

descriptions. Please note that others may be added on the coming weeks. • ARISE High School

• California Environmental Justice Alliance (CEJA)

• East Bay Regional Parks District Archives (EBRPD)

• Local Clean Energy Alliance (LCEA)

• New Mexico Environmental Law Center (NMELC)

• People Power Solar Cooperative

• Water@UW

• Wholly H2O

Student Initiated Engagement Opportunities: You can arrange to work with a CPO on your

own. Contact Lucy or Katherine (and cc Kurt) for project approval. 1) Project description: Identify the partner organization and what you anticipate doing for the project. 2) Progress Report: A. Project summary: Identify the CPO, and briefly describe your engagement. B. Task and Resource Inventory: This can be presented as a bullet point list, spreadsheet or table.

• Description of work completed

• Description of planned tasks and timeline

• List of resources that you have on hand and plan to acquire for your project C. Annotated bibliography: Write three annotated bibliography entries on articles, book chapters,

magazine articles, primary sources from online archives, maps and other sources associated with

your topic. The goal is to identify material that is relevant to your project. Consult with your CPO.

*See “Annotated bibliography information” sheet in the FP folder on bCourses. 3) Final Project Summary: Include the following in one pdf:

• A one-page summary of what you did for your project: Include a description and a copy of the final product you submitted to your CPO, if applicable.

• Updated task inventory: Specify the hours you engaged in each task. • One to two-page reflection on your engagement experience.

 

 

 

 

 

25

Option 5 (O5): INDEPENDENT PROJECT • 1-4 persons

• Project coordinator: Varies. Check with your GSI.

• No required workshops, but you may be required to arrange up to 3 “check-ins” with your project coordinator.

 

Assignment: This is an opportunity to develop your own final project related to course content and

themes. There are many possibilities, including, but not limited to the following:

• Develop an environmental campaign: For example, an ESPM 50AC student recently initiated a campaign to eliminate the use of herbicides on campus athletic fields, as a start on a broader

campaign to eliminate the use of herbicides across campus.

• Conduct research for or in collaboration with an environmental or social justice non-profit: For example, you could assist in the policy-oriented or survey research with an environmental

justice organization. We do not have specific projects lined up at this time, so it is a matter of

you engaging potential partners. One way to do this would be through an internship.

• Start a sustainability initiative: For example, you could develop a program or educational materials for your on-campus organization, your dorm or your frat regarding food waste.

• Apply for funding for an environmental or social justice project for yourself or a club or organization.

• Engage in a public arts project, alone or as part of a larger endeavor

Approval required: You must consult with your GSI and/or Kurt, and receive approval for your

project from Kurt before submitting your Project description.

 

Sub-assignment Due date Grade value

1) Project Description F (10/2) on bCourses by 10pm 10 points (-20 if no submission) 2) Progress Report Su (11/15) on bCourses by 10pm 40 points

3) Final Draft Su (12/6) on bCourses by 10pm 200 points

*If you are involved with an ongoing project or an organization that you think could benefit from

student support, and you would like to recruit ESPM 50 students to work with you, please contact Kurt

and/or your GSI to discuss the project.

 

1) Project description: Identify the partner organization and what you anticipate doing for the project.

2) Progress Report:

A. Project summary: Briefly describe your project.

B. Task and Resource Inventory: This can be presented as a bullet point list, spreadsheet or table.

• Description of work completed

• Description of planned tasks and timeline

• List of resources that you have on hand and plan to acquire for your project

C. See “Annotated bibliography guidelines” in the FP folder on bCourses.

Annotated bibliography: Each team member should write three annotated bibliography entries, two of

which must be either peer reviewed articles or (chapters from) academic press books. You may also

annotate primary videos, podcasts, texts and art works, if appropriate to your project. Do not annotate

websites, blogs or newspapers. Focus on explaining how each reference may support your project.

See “Annotated bibliography guidelines” in the FP folder on bCourses.

 

3) Final Project Summary: Determine the form and content of this with your project coordinator.

 

 

 

 

26

 

 

  • ESPM 50 – Final Project Fall 2020
  • Option 1B (O1B): POLICY BRIEF
  •  Peter Dykstra. Environmental Health News. Analysis: Environmental journalism reaches middle age, with mixed results
  • Option 1E (O1E): PODCAST & VIDEO
  •  How to Start a Podcast: 7 Steps for Podcasting Beginners!
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2C6FxZuvYU
  •  How To Start A Podcast For Free: Complete Guide. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aup6AOsIg-Q
  •  Podcast Motor. Learn How to Create Killer Podcasts With 25 Free Audio Resources. https://www.podcastmotor.com/learn-how-to-create-killer-podcasts-with-25-free-audio-resources/
  •  Podcast 101. 40 Free Audio Resources to Help Make Your Podcast Sound Great
  • https://medium.com/podcast-101/40-free-audio-resources-to-help-make-your-podcast-sound-great-9731ea24c657
  •  Sullivan, Terry. How to Create Your Own Successful Podcast. PC Magazine. July 31, 2018.
  • Option 2A (O2A): DECAL COURSE DEVELOPMENT
  • Option 2B (O2B): K-12 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
  •  1-3 persons
  •  Project Coordinators:
  • o Kayla Cathers <kayla_cathers@berkeley.edu>. Office Hours: Tuesday 2:30-4. Zoom Link
  • o Eric Peterson <ericpeterson@berkeley.edu>. Email for office hours
  • 1) Project description: Describe your project in as much detail as you can at this point in terms of:
  • 2) Progress Report:
  • 3) Final draft: Include the following:
  • Option 3 (O3): COMMUNITY PARTNER ENGAGEMENT
  • Option 5 (O5): INDEPENDENT PROJECT

Water is an essential resource for the sustenance of life. One can survive without food for

a few days but surviving without water for even a few hours is near to impossible. Water is not

only the need of an individual, it is a primary need for every industry. Although water is not a

limited resource because it can be revived through the evaporation cycle and rain along with 7-%

water bodies on the surface of planet earth yet due to excessive industrialization and poor

management, water is becoming a scarce resource. Most countries in the world are facing a water

crisis and this phenomenon is not limited to developing states as the United States is one of the

most adversely impacted countries by the Water crisis. The country’s southwestern region has

been facing a water crisis for many years now. But now the issue is expanding to the rest of the

country. Across the country, not only a small town but also big cities are facing increasing

challenges in their access to clean drinking water. The industrialization has been the engine of

success but it has contaminated the clean drinking water. Along with industrialization, poor

management, absence of governmental insights and aging infrastructure has added more fuel to

the already severe crisis. This paper will explore in detail the causal factors behind the water

crisis in the United States and their implications on the lives of millions of Americans (USDS,

2010).

Comments form Prof.

This is too broad. Pick a specific region, ie the southwest as you mentioned, and explore water management issues. Keep in mind CULTURE as a key theme.

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