Project Program Report-STUDENT AND ACADEMIC SERVICES BUILDING

STUDENT AND ACADEMIC SERVICES BUILDING

NAU Project No.: 09.600.141

 

Project Program Report

April 21, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

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Prepared by:

DWL Architects + Planners, Inc. 2333 N. Central Avenue, Phoenix, Arizona 85004 P: (602) 264-9731 F: (602) 264-1928 www.dwlarchitects.com

 

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Cover –

Authorship 1

Table of Contents 2

01 Overall Project Information 3

02 Architectural Narrative 4

03 Structural Narrative 8

04 Mechanical and Plumbing Narrative 10

05 Electrical Narrative 16

06 LEED Certification Summary 19

07 Program summary of spaces: 21

Table 1: Net-assignable Area

Table 2: Non-assignable Circulation and Utility areas

Table 3: Net-assignable and Gross Area Calculations

 

Appendix 1: Architectural Outline Specifications

Appendix 2: Draft Program – Space requirements by room

Appendix 3: Draft Program – Furniture Schedule

Appendix 4: Detailed LEED Scorecard – Schematic Design.

Appendix 5: AV Systems:

AV Systems Schematic Design Quote

Network and Electrical Considerations

Appendix 6: Preliminary Estimated Energy Consumption Summary.

 

 

 

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01. OVERALL PROJECT INFORMATION

 

Project Team:

American Campus Communities 12700 Hill Country Boulevard, Suite T-200 Austin, Texas 78738 Construction Manager: Hardison Downey Construction 6150 N. 16th Street, Suite A Phoenix, AZ 85016 Architectural: DWL Architects + Planners, Inc. 2333 N. Central Avenue Phoenix, AZ 85004 602-264-9731 | 602-264-1928F Civil/ Landscape: The WLB Group 500 N. Beaver St. Flagstaff, AZ 86001 Structural: Caruso Turley Scott Structural Engineers 1215 W. Rio Salado Pkwy, Suite 200 Tempe, AZ 85281 Mechanical, Plumbing & Electrical: LSW Engineers Arizona, Inc. 2333 W. Northern Avenue. #9 Phoenix, AZ 85021 Audio Visual: CCS Presentation Systems / Southwest 17350 N. Hartford Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85255

Project Description:

The proposed Northern Arizona University campus Student and Academic Services Building is an approximately 94,000 square foot academic building that will include a One Stop Students Service Center, Undergraduate Admissions Center, an auditorium, mathematics computer lab, classrooms, department offices, faculty offices, conference rooms, restrooms, circulation, support facilities, and interior mechanical spaces. Building systems components will be housed in a roof top penthouse and dedicated facility service access rooms.

 

 

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02. ARCHITECTURAL NARRATIVE

General Description: The proposed Northern Arizona University campus Student and Academic Services Building is an approximately 94,000 square foot academic building located at 1101 S. San Francisco Street in Flagstaff, Arizona. The new structure will be constructed abutting the west elevation of the existing San Francisco Street Parking Garage. Program facilities to be incorporated will include a One-Stop Students Service Center, Undergraduate Admissions Center with an 152 person auditorium, a Mathematics Emporium / computer lab, 3-5 classrooms, 4 department offices, 152 faculty offices, 5 conference rooms, restrooms, circulation, support facilities, and interior mechanical spaces. Building systems equipment and service pathways will be housed in a roof top penthouse, ground floor service access rooms and in a dedicated utility bay separating the new program areas from the existing parking structure. Program Configuration: The university’s approved space program for the new facility calls for the development of five primary functional use areas. The locations of these areas within the building are predicated upon the physical capacity, occupancy type and means of access/egress required to serve the intended program uses. Initial discussions between the design team and departmental stakeholders representing the One-Stop Student Center, Under Graduate Admissions and Math Emporium programs identified a three tier hierarchy for the functional uses and internal circulation requirements. Placement of the One-Stop Students Center and UG Admissions on the building’s first level was deemed essential to satisfying the anticipated service needs of both current and future students seeking assistance. The Math Emporium with its high volume usage, open instructional commons, sub-divisible classrooms, adjacent staff offices and desired external views logically positioned itself on the second level. The ACC project team was requested to develop a minimum of two design concepts for the Academic Departments space. The first concept adjusts the size of the departments’ development program to fit within a three story facility to come as close as possible to achieving the mandated 80,000 sf. maximum gross building area. The second concept increases the size of the gross building area as required to accommodate the Academic Department’s office space program in a four story facility. A 5,000 sf. mechanical rooftop penthouse sits atop the easternmost edge of the otherwise four story building structure. Conceptual Building Design: It is understood that the design for this project must create an appropriate identity for Northern Arizona University while respecting the context of the adjacent campus districts, the surrounding vocabulary of architectural language and the precepts contained in the Northern Arizona University Campus Master Plan. In support of this prerequisite the following narrative describes the underlying abstract for the schematic design of this project. The conceptual design for the Student and Academic Services Building project closely aligns the functional hierarchy of its programmed interiors with the articulated massing of its external envelope. The building’s exterior identity draws its aesthetic inspiration from the biologic forms of the area’s extensive Ponderosa Pine Forests and the architectural features of the existing campus facilities. The design for the new SAS Building brings together and visually celebrates the unique attributes of the NAU campus’s urban and natural environments. Site Improvements: Nestled between the imaginary lot lines of the Beaver Street transit spline (West), the existing San Francisco Street Parking Structure (East), the existing Bookstore (North) and Blome Drive (South), the site selected by the University significantly influences the architectural design. With its physical boundaries defined by adjacent structures, campus underground utilities paths, pedestrian circulation and vehicular right of ways, the resulting volume can accommodate a buildable volume approximately 356’ in length, 86’ wide and 78’ in height. The conceptual design of the first and second floor levels serve to

 

 

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avoid and/or minimize the project’s impact upon the project site’s existing construction. The building’s ground floor coverage is significantly reduced by supporting a portion of the second floor atop 2-story tall columns spanning beyond the existing diagonal sidewalks initially used to define the north and south limits of the project site. To better facilitate the new project’s development, the pedestrian entrance serving the parking structure will be relocated using the existing partial wall opening through the north side of the garage. A 1:20 sloped sidewalk serving both the parking structure’s new entrance and the SAS Building’s adjacent egress stair will extend to the existing University Bookstore sidewalk system. Beginning from ground level, the building primary entrances are accessed by ascending nominally sloping sidewalks, wide stairways or code compliant ramps. The first floor forms an elevated base rising five feet above the adjacent existing sidewalks that lead to the Bookstore. The One-Stop Students Service Center is located at the structure’s north end with its own separate building entrance while the Undergraduate Admissions Center with its attached auditorium occupies the south end. The new concrete sidewalk leading to the building’s main entrance near the center of its west elevation will required construction of minor retaining walls to restrain the sides of the ramp. This also serves to retain the existing five foot landscape strip supporting seasonal snow removal efforts. The existing campus domestic water & fire hydrant line, abandoned 4” steam line, water service line feeding the parking garage and the storm drain running immediately adjacent to sidewalk along the west edge of the project site will require partial relocation to facilitate the new construction. General Landscaping: The quantity of the site landscaping will be commensurate with that found throughout the general campus. Plant selections shall include shade tolerant species in the areas located adjacent to the building entrances, along the edges of south special events plaza and beneath the elevated portions of the second floor level. Site improvements will likely consist mostly of planting soft-scape and some hardscape materials with possible relocation of the bus stop amenities and bicycle storage components near the north end of the project site. Building Program Design: The first floor forms an elevated base rising five feet above the adjacent existing sidewalks that lead to the Bookstore. The One-Stop Students Service Center is located at the structure’s north end with its own separate building entrance while the Undergraduate Admissions Center with its attached auditorium occupies the south end. The main building entrance is located on the west between these departments and leads to a large central lobby from which elevators and a grand staircase circulate users to the higher floors in the building. A special events plaza shaded beneath the upper floors of the building and directly accessible from the auditorium fills out the south end of the first floor level. The second floor is defined by the open character and various scales of the functions for which it is intended. The primary academic spaces within the Math Emporium include three large sub-dividable classrooms at the north end, an enclosed testing lab, a sub-dividable tutorial room and the large open computer center with 250 workstations occupying the major portion of the south end. The second floor provides numerous small rooms for formal study as well as casual socialization spaces to enhance opportunities for incidental and cross-disciplinary learning. The third and fourth floors are configured to accommodate two general academic department office areas. Both floor plans hold the same number of department, staff and faculty occupants with only minor positional variations associated with area differences between the large/small and twin medium conference room sizes. Shared department amenities include large lobby waiting areas, open floor lounges with kitchenettes, various sized informal socialization spaces as well as numerous vision panels and skylights introducing natural light deep within the building’s internal corridors.

 

 

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Shell Construction: The primary building structure will consist of drilled caisson foundations supporting continuous concrete grade beams along the perimeter, concrete slab-on-grade on the First Floor and steel moment frame with concrete/metal decks at all Floors above. The first floor level will be raised above the 100 year flood plain record to minimize potential issues associated with flooding. Geotechnical remediation the existing expansive soil conditions will be required. Currently, the final determination regarding the selection of the building’s exterior wall and roof assemblies remains pending. It is anticipated, that one or more of the following building systems will be utilized to enclose the shell structure: a combined fire rated separation wall with one wall constructed of using a full height 1hr. gypsum shaft wall assembly and the other a partial 1hr. gypsum shaft wall infilling the openings in the precast concrete wall panels in the west elevation of the parking garage. Construction assemblies and materials shall also include pneumatically applied cementitious fire proofing on all structural steel members; typical metal pan tread stair assemblies will be used for the north and a south emergency stairways. The building’s exterior walls shall be constructed utilize both integrally colored cementiticious fiber and/or prefabricated metal rain screen panels mechanically fastened over a continuous HPS insulation system or interlocking insulated panel with surface waterproofing; insulated glass/aluminum storefront window systems (single story) at all building entrance; (2) hydraulic elevators co-located in a single hoistway with provision for the addition of a future third elevator); will insulated glass/aluminum storefront (fixed and operable) at all exterior window locations; 4’x12’ pre-manufactured roof skylights; structural roof decking sloped to drain; R-25 minimum 2” continuous rigid insulation and a “KEE” waterproof membrane system or other built-up system as required by the University. Exterior Elevations Design: As described briefly above, the building’s exterior design is being developed as an abstract portrayal of the surrounding region’s Ponderosa Pine Forests. The rise and fall of forest pathways through the local topography is depicted by numerous sidewalks, ramps and stairways leading up to the building’s exterior entrances and the elevated events plaza to the south. The exterior walls surrounding the first floor will incorporate vertical bands of glass interspersed with colored cementitious fiber and folded seam metal panels to visually represent the trunks of varying widths extending deeper into the forest. These elements enliven the forest appearance by visually interrupting the views of the activities occurring within the One- Stop and Undergraduate Admission spaces when viewed from the exterior. The degree of transparency decreases as the external wall treatments rise up to the second floor level. The intermittent placement study nooks, socialization spaces, and the large conference room along the west wall as well as the Math Emporium’s open computer center represent the natural voids between the opaque clusters of low hanging pine boughs. Different window sizes and groupings used to introduce natural light into these spaces are also separated by larger areas of opaque wall panels scribed with diagonal joint patterns to further enhance the conceptual image of the low forest canopy. The nominal amount of external wall transparency is reached on the third and fourth floors housing the Academic Department Offices. Here, the semi-sequential placement of much narrower operable office windows and modest lobby/study nooks fixed window openings allow natural light and ventilation filter into all of the exterior offices. Each opening is surrounded by opaque field panels scribed with more complex diagonal joint patterns arranged to convey both an image pattern of individual pine needles and to represent the dense upper crown of the forest canopy. Building Interiors: The anticipated interior finishes will consist of the following assemblies: a custom patterned .376” thick ‘epoxy terrazzo’ topping, ground and polished throughout the building’s ground floor lobby area; carpet flooring tiles used throughout the SAS and UA office service areas, the Math Emporium and Academic Department areas and all upper elevator lobbies; ceramic flooring and wall tiles in the restrooms; hard trowel concrete in the mechanical penthouses, utility service rooms and enclosed exit stairs, painted

 

 

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gypsum wall board enclosing all office and classroom spaces; elevator shafts and 2hr. rated exit stairs will be enclosed in painted gypsum wall board; acoustic sound paneling at select locations in the auditorium; fiber sound insulation within all walls surrounding the auditorium, testing, conference, restroom; mechanical and electrical rooms; suspended acoustic ceiling systems used throughout the facility with framed gypsum wallboard soffits and ceiling profiles at select locations (i.e., elevator lobbies & academic department conference rooms). The auditorium’s vista vision windows and all office windows shall be equipped with operable roll down window assemblies. Summary: The above narratives describe the primary design concepts and supporting construction technologies developed by DWL Architects + Planners and its consultants during the initial programming stages for the schematic design of this project. The building’s secondary sub-systems, components, materials and exposed finishes remain conceptual in nature and subject to change pending future input from various project stakeholders and combined development team (i.e., NAU, American Campus Communities, Hardison Downey, DWL, LSW, CTS, WLB, CCS and Speedie Associates). Working closely together, the members of this group will create a project that is distinctive and worthy of Northern Arizona University’s increasing prestige and which will faithfully serve institution for many decades to come.

 

 

CARUSO TURLEY SCOTT consul t ing structura l engineers

YOUR VISION IS OUR MISSION

PARTNERS

Richard D. Turley, PE

Paul G. Scott, PE, SE

Sandra J. Herd, PE, SE

Chris J. Atkinson, PE, SE

Thomas R. Morris, PE

Richard A. Dahlmann, PE

1215 W. Rio Salado Pkwy. Suite 200 Tempe, AZ 85281 T: (480) 774-1700 F: (480) 774-1701 www.ctsaz.com

April 18, 2014

Mark Dee, AIA DWL Architects 2333 N. Central Ave Phoenix, AZ 85044

RE: NAU Student and Academic Services Building (SD-Structural narrative) 1101 S San Francisco St, Flagstaff AZ, 86011 CTS Job No.: 14-122

Schematic Design Structural Narrative:

CODE:

This 4 story steel building with a penthouse at the roof will be design under the 2009 International Building Code.

STRUCTURAL SYSTEM:

Roof: The structural system at the roof and penthouse, consist of steel joists over steel deck supported by steel beams (WF-Sections) located at main grids and at cantilever areas.

Floors: The structural system at all floors consist of concrete topping over steel deck, supported by steel beams and wide flange steel columns located at all main grids. This composite system consists of 3” of normal weight concrete over 3” steel metal deck with 6x6xW2.9xW2.9 W.W.F. centered in the slab (6” total depth). Beams at all floor levels range from 16” to 30” in depth, and steel columns sizes will range between 12” and 14”.

Floor Level: The ground level will consists of a 5” concrete slab with #4 bars spaced at 18” o.c. each way over 4” of ABC, over a vapor barrier. Due to the type of soil under the proposed building, a stabilization process will be required (Refer to geotechnical report for further information).

Foundation System: The system for the building consists of concrete caissons (deep foundation). A caisson will be located at all main grid columns, elevators and stairs. The caissons will vary in size and in length depending on the final findings of pilot holes currently being done at the site, as well as recommendations from the soil engineer.

 

 

CARUSO TURLEY SCOTT consul t ing structura l engineers

YOUR VISION IS OUR MISSION

PARTNERS

Richard D. Turley, PE

Paul G. Scott, PE, SE

Sandra J. Herd, PE, SE

Chris J. Atkinson, PE, SE

Thomas R. Morris, PE

Richard A. Dahlmann, PE

1215 W. Rio Salado Pkwy. Suite 200 Tempe, AZ 85281 T: (480) 774-1700 F: (480) 774-1701 www.ctsaz.com

Building Lateral System: The lateral system of the building consists of steel Moment Frames (steel beams and steel columns). This particular system was selected by the design team with the intent that it will provide an open space. All Lateral columns will then be supported by concrete caissons.

End of Narrative

If you have any questions regarding this schematic design structural narrative, please call our office at (480) 774-1700.

Respectfully submitted,

Caruso Turley Scott, Consulting Structural Engineers.

 

 

 

2333 W Northern Ave, #9 . Phoenix, Arizona 85021-9334 . Telephone 602.249.1320 . Facsimile 602.336.3276

NAU STUDENT AND ACADEMIC SERVICES BUILDING

MECHANICAL, PLUMBING, & FIRE PROTECTION

SCHEMATIC DESIGN NARRATIVE The New Northern Arizona University campus Student and Academic Services Building will be an approximately 94,000 square foot academic building that will include an auditorium, mathematics computer lab, classrooms, faculty offices, restrooms, circulation, support facilities, and a mechanical penthouse. Facility mechanical system components will include chilled water variable-air-volume (VAV) air handling units with VAV boxes with hot water heat, perimeter finned tube convectors, steam to hot water heat exchangers, and heating hot water pumps. All mechanical, plumbing, and fire protection systems will be designed to meet NAU’s design guidelines and specifications. The specific design criteria to which the mechanical systems have been designed at the schematic design level are as follows: Summer Outdoor: 90°F db, 65°F wb Summer Indoor: 78°F Winter Outdoor: -20°F Winter Indoor (Mechanical Rooms): 50°F Winter Indoor (All Other Rooms): 72°F For energy modeling purposes, we have assumed setbacks of 5°F above cooling and 5°F below heating during unoccupied hours. Preliminary Envelope Values: Roofs Insulation Entirely Above Deck U=0.048 Walls Above Grade Steel Framed U=0.064 Floors Mass U=0.074 Vertical Glazing Metal Framing (All Other) U=0.55, SHGC=0.40 Skylight w/ Curb Plastic, 0-2% of Roof U=1.10, SHGC=0.77 These envelope values are based on ASHRAE 90.1 minimum values for preliminary energy modeling and load calculation purposes. Once a more detailed energy model is developed and compared to the ASHRAE 90.1 Baseline, these numbers will be adjusted to achieve the desired Energy and Atmosphere (EA) credits associated with LEED. These calculations will be performed using actual utility cost data from the campus steam and chilled water plants that will serve this building, as LEED EA calculations are based on energy cost savings. As the energy model is further developed, these energy costs will be compared to the ASHRAE 90.1 Baseline model to allow the design team to further evaluate the building’s envelope, mechanical systems, and electrical systems to determine the most effective energy cost savings approach, while still remaining cognizant of the building’s construction budget. Building Mechanical Piping Systems The building’s mechanical systems will be served by the campus chilled water, and the campus steam and condensate piping distribution systems.

 

 

 

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Six inch chilled water supply and return piping will be extended to the building from the campus chilled water distribution system with 15 psig of differential pressure at the building entrance. Tertiary chilled water pumps will not be provided, as all of the chilled water pumping on campus is done at the central chilled water plant. Chilled water will be supplied to the building at 42°F during the summer with a 20°F split. During the winter, the chilled water will be supplied to the building at 55°F, so the system has also been evaluated and sized for internal cooling loads during the winter with an elevated chilled water supply temperature. The chilled water piping will serve the chilled water cooling coils in the variable-air-volume (VAV) air handing units located in the mechanical penthouse. The chilled water system, including piping, valves, coils, strainers, etc., has been sized large enough so that the 15 psig that is being supplied to the building is adequate to serve the building during peak load conditions. A new 5” steam line and a 2” steam condensate return line will be supplied to this building to serve the building’s heating and domestic hot water systems. This new 60 psig steam line and condensate return line will connect to the existing 60 psig steam main and steam condensate main located in the steam tunnel that is located just west of the Transit Spine or Beaver Street. The new 5” steam line and new 2” steam condensate line will connect to the existing 10” steam line and 6” steam condensate return line in the existing tunnel. These new pipes will be routed to the building in a sloped concrete pipe chase that is shown on the civil drawings. The piping will be pitched toward the existing tunnel where a steam trap will be provided to remove condensate from the new steam line that serves the new building. This trap will be located in a new concrete vestibule that is being added to the existing tunnel for ease of construction and maintenance. Once the piping is extended up into the building’s Heat Exchanger Room, it will serve redundant shell and tube heat exchangers and redundant domestic water heaters. The steam pressure will be reduced from 60 psig to 15 psig via a one-third, two-thirds arrangement of Fisher 92B pressure reducing valves. A bypass will be included in this arrangement for maintenance considerations. An 8”, 15 psig steam line will be extended to the shell and tube heat exchangers. Two 100% redundant, 6,800 MBH Bell & Gossett QSU 14 4-2 shell and tube heat exchangers will be provided to handle the building’s heating requirements. Two 350 GPM, 100% redundant heating hot water pumps with 35 feet of head will be provided in this room and will be equipped with variable frequency drives (VFDs) to allow the pumps to vary speeds based on the building’s heating load. Basis of design will be Bell and Gossett 1510 base- mounted, end-suction pumps. The steam condensate from the heating hot water heat exchangers and the domestic water heat exchangers will flow to a condensate return unit in the same room. This unit will be ventilated to the outside and will have redundant condensate return pumps which will pump the condensate at 35 GPM and 50 psig back to the main campus condensate line located in the existing steam tunnel. The heating hot water system will serve hot water heating coils in the VAV air handling units, single duct variable-air-volume terminal units, miscellaneous cabinet and unit heaters in mechanical spaces, stairways, and entry vestibules, and the snow melt systems. Hot water finned-tube convectors will also be utilized in all perimeter spaces. Due to the high percentage of outside air that is required by ASHRAE 62.1-2007 for the air handling units, the heating hot water loop will serve plate and frame heat exchangers located in the penthouse. These heat exchangers will transfer heat from the building’s heating hot water loop to 40% propylene glycol loops that will serve the heating coils in the air handling units. This will allow the majority of the building that does not have freezing concerns to run off of the standard heating hot water loop, while keeping the glycol loops located in the penthouse. Each air handling unit will be provided with a separate heat exchanger and glycol loop, consisting of redundant in-line Bell & Gossett pumps, sized for 90 gpm and 25 feet of head. One common glycol feed system will supply both loops. Per NAU guidelines, run-around heat recovery loops have been provided for both air handling units since the outside air quantities exceed 50% of the total airflow. These coils will be provided with heat recovery pumps sized at approximately 150 GPM and 40 ft of head. Since demand control ventilation is being used on this building, an energy simulation will be run to compare the effectiveness of the heat recovery coil

 

 

 

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versus the fan and pump energy penalty that will be seen year-round. It is our opinion that the heat recovery coil may end up penalizing the overall efficiency of the system since the unit will have an air-side economizer and the fans would be seeing the extra pressure drop year-round. Once the energy model is further developed, this simulation will be shared with NAU for their input. An hydronic snow-melt system will be provided to serve the north entrance of the building. The area served by this system will be approximately 1,500 square feet and will be served by a snow melt manifold located on an adjacent exterior wall. Flexible snow-melt tubing will be run from the manifold into the adjacent concrete slab where it will heat the concrete slab to melt the snow. In a remote room, a small plate and frame heat exchanger, a snow melt pump, and a glycol feed unit will be provided to serve the snow melt manifold. The plate and frame heat exchangers will transfer heat from the building’s heating hot water loop to the 50% propylene glycol snow melt loop. Snow melt sensors will be provided in the slab so that the system will only run when appropriate temperatures and moistures are detected. As requested by NAU, an alternate bid number should be provided for providing an additional snow melt system that will serve approximately 2,000 square feet along west side of the building. Chilled and heating hot water piping within the building envelope will be Schedule 40 steel or Type L copper tubing with either threaded, welded, or brazed joints depending on the size of the pipe and application. Grooved or press-fit fittings will not be acceptable. Direct buried chilled water piping will be specified by the civil engineer. Steam piping will be Schedule 80 steel pipe with welded and flanged joints for piping larger than 2” and threaded joints for piping 2” and smaller. Steam condensate piping will be Schedule 80 steel piping with welded and flanged joints for piping larger than 2” and threaded joints for piping 2” and smaller. Chilled water, heating hot water, and steam and condensate piping will be insulated with pre-formed mineral fiber pipe insulation with thicknesses that meet or exceed the local energy code. The steam piping and chilled water piping entering the building will be supplied with BTU meters for tracking through the building automation system. Air Handling and Air Distribution System Two central 40,000 CFM VAV air handling units will be located in a mechanical penthouse on the roof, with one unit serving the north half of the building and one unit serving the south half of the building. The air handling units will consist of a return plenum, a relief fan array controlled by a redundant unit mounted VFDs without bypasses, energy recovery coils located in the supply and relief air stream, an economizer section with dampers and controls, side loading pre-filter (4” pleated MERV 7) and side loading final filter bank (6” rigid MERV 13), heating and chilled water coils with access on the discharge side of each, a freezestat located on the leaving side of the hot water coil, and supply fan array controlled by redundant unit mounted VFDs without bypasses. The supply and return fans will have air flow measurement capabilities. The chilled water coil and the heating hot water coil in these air handlers will have two-way control valves that will modulate to maintain leaving air temperatures. The heating hot water coil will have a 40% propylene glycol loop as discussed in the previous piping section. The units have been selected and sized with a 450 fpm velocity across the cooling coil per NAU guidelines. The casing of the units will be double-wall, non-porous 18-gauge construction. Access will be provided all around the air handling units for coil, fan, filter, and damper access. Basis of design for air handling units will be Temtrol, with Energy Labs, Huntair, and Haakon listed as equivalents. The air handling units will be ducted to intake and relief air louvers. The intake louver will provide outside air to the air handling unit. A 42” deep plenum will be provided on the penthouse side of the louver to allow any fly snow to fall out of the air stream. The bottom of the plenum will be provided with a small electric snow melt system with the snow melt system only activated if temperature and moisture sensors detect snow in the plenum. A drain will be provided in this plenum to allow any melted snow to drain. The outside air duct to the unit will connect to the plenum as high as possible in order to minimize the potential for snow getting into the air handling unit. Air flow measurement stations will be provided in the outside air

 

 

 

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ductwork. The relief duct will come out of the back of the unit and will be ducted directly to the relief louver in the penthouse wall. Main supply and return ductwork will be routed down to the floors below in two centrally located shafts. Supply and return branches will be taken off on each floor. Supply ductwork will extend through the plenum space above the ceiling and will serve VAV terminal units with hot water reheat coils. One VAV terminal unit will be provided for every two offices and one VAV terminal unit will be provided per conference room. Spaces such as the auditorium and the large math center will require multiple terminal units to satisfy the peak load conditions. The space above the ceiling on each level will serve as a return air plenum to minimize the amount of ductwork and increase the energy efficiency of the building. As many of the walls will be going to the structure above, return air and transfer boots will be provided to transfer the air from the rooms to the common corridor plenum where the main return duct inlet is located. Ductwork will be galvanized steel and constructed in accordance with the latest edition of SMACNA. Rectangular supply and return ductwork will be lined with 2” fibrous glass duct liner. Spiral ductwork downstream of the terminal units will be wrapped with 2” mineral-fiber blanket duct insulation wrap. Outside air intake ductwork will be insulated with 3” mineral-fiber blanket duct insulation wrap. Exhaust ductwork will be provided with ½” fibrous glass duct liner for noise control. All duct systems will be low pressure, low velocity systems sized at a maximum pressure drop of 0.08”/100’ and a maximum velocity of 2,000 fpm. Air handling unit fan systems will have a maximum of 2” of external static pressure. An in-line exhaust fan located in penthouse will serve the stack of main restrooms and any other miscellaneous exhaust, such as janitors’ closets. The exhaust duct leaving this fan will be ducted to an exhaust louver on the west face of the penthouse. IDF rooms will be cooled via a ceiling mounted transfer fan with a door mounted inlet grille. Once final loads of the IDF rooms have been determined, if mechanical cooling is required, mini-split systems will be added to the IDF rooms to satisfy the cooling loads. These standalone systems will operate 24 hours a day so that the air handling units can be shut down or set back during unoccupied hours. Mechanical rooms will be served by hot water unit heaters. The mechanical penthouse will be served by two, four-pipe fan coil units. Stairways and entry vestibules will be served by hot water cabinet heaters. The building will be provided with a direct digital control system to serve as the building automation system (BAS). This system will be computer based and will be tied into the campus’ existing BAS to allow for remote monitoring. All mechanical and plumbing equipment will be monitored through the building automation system with the exception of small equipment such as unit heaters or elevator sump pumps. New graphics will be provided by the BAS contractor for this building. The basis of design for the BAS will be Alerton. Plumbing The building will be served by a 2” domestic cold water line, a 3” reclaimed water line, and a 8” fire line. These three lines will have risers in the grade level Heat Exchanger Room. The domestic and reclaimed water lines will have meters and backflow preventers and the fire line will have a double check backflow assembly located in this room. The domestic water and reclaimed water lines will have pressure reducing stations to reduce the water pressure to 80 psig. Redundant 120-gallon, cement-lined, tank-type domestic water heaters will be located in the Heat Exchanger Room. Steam will be supplied to the water heaters from the campus steam system. Basis of design for these water heaters will be Cemline. Domestic hot water will be generated and stored in the tank at 140°F. Prior to distribution to the building, a thermostatic mixing valve will mix the water

 

 

 

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temperature down to 120°F. A domestic hot water recirculation pump will be provided to circulate hot water throughout the facility at all occupied hours so that hot water is available at all plumbing fixtures. A water softener will be provided in the heat exchanger room and will be dedicated to serve only the water heaters and heating hot water fill. The reclaimed water service will provide non-potable water for flushing of toilets and urinals. A waste and vent system will be provided for all sanitary drainage located in the facility, such as toilets, urinals, sinks, lavatories, floor sinks, and floor drains. A 6” sanitary main will exit the building below grade to the south. Above grade sanitary waste and vent piping will be epoxy-coated, hubless, cast-iron soil pipe with four-band no-hub couplings and fittings. Below grade sanitary waste and vent piping will be PVC (solid core) with solvent weld fittings. A storm drain system will be provided to drain the roof of the building. This system will consist of roof drains and overflow drains. Roof drain leaders will be collected and routed below grade to 5’-0” outside the building for connection to the site storm drainage system. Overflow drain leaders will terminate with downspout nozzles at grade level and will spill onto a visible splash block. Above grade storm drainage piping will be epoxy-coated, hubless, cast-iron soil pipe with four-band, no-hub couplings and fittings. Below grade storm drainage piping will be PVC (solid core) with solvent weld fittings. Roof drain bodies and adjacent horizontal roof drain leaders will be heat traced and insulated with 1-1/2” mineral fiber insulation. All other roof drain piping will be insulated with 1” thick mineral-fiber preformed pipe insulation. Domestic cold water, domestic hot water, domestic recirculation, and reclaimed water piping will be Type L copper with wrought copper soldered or brazed joints and fittings. Domestic cold water return piping will be insulated with mineral-fiber preformed pipe insulation, 1” thick for piping 1-1/2” and smaller and 1-1/2” thick for piping larger than 1-1/2”. Domestic hot water and domestic hot water return piping will be insulated with 1” thick mineral-fiber preformed pipe insulation. Plumbing Fixtures will be by one of the following manufacturers: American Standard, Kohler, Delta, Elkay, Zurn, or approved equal. All fixtures will be per NAU standards and subsequent conversations with NAU facilities personnel:

 Water Closets: Wall hung, vitreous china, dual-flush siphon jet type, maximum of 1.3 gpf.

 Urinals: Wall hung, vitreous china with 0.125 gpf flush valve.

 Lavatories: Vitreous china with 0.5 gpm metering faucet.

 Sinks: Self-rimming stainless steel type with faucet with 1.0 gpm aerator.

 Showers: 1.5 gpm.

 Mop Sinks: Floor mounted, molded stone, 24”x24”.

 Drinking Fountains / Hydration Stations: Two-level wall mounted electric water cooler with push- bar front and rounded corners. Water bottle fill will be included with each drinking fountain.

A 50 gpm sump pump with an oil sensing device will be provided for the elevator pit per elevator code requirements. A 5 gpm sump pump will be provided in the new steam tunnel vestibule to rid the tunnel of any nuisance water. The pump discharge will be pumped into an adjacent storm manhole below grade.

 

 

 

Page 6

Fire Protection A performance based design will be provided for the fire sprinkler system of the building. The fire riser will enter the building in the grade level Heat Exchanger Room where the double check valve assembly will be located. The complete fire sprinkler system will be required to be designed in accordance with NFPA 13. Dry or pre-action fire sprinklers will be required at building entrance canopies/cantilevers. An air compressor located in the heat exchanger room will most likely be required for these applications. Flow and tamper switches will be integrated with the building fire alarm system. This system will be further coordinated with the contractor and the fire protection subcontractor as the design progresses. End of the Mechanical Narrative.

 

 

 

2333 W Northern Ave, #9 . Phoenix, Arizona 85021-9334 . Telephone 602.249.1320 . Facsimile 602.336.3276

NAU STUDENT AND ACADEMIC SERVICES BUILDING

ELECTRICAL SCHEMATIC DESIGN NARRATIVE The New Northern Arizona University campus Student and Academic Services Building will be an approximately 94,000 square foot academic building that will include an auditorium, mathematics computer lab, classrooms, faculty offices, restrooms, circulation, support facilities, and a mechanical penthouse. The electrical systems will be planned based on the “100-year Building” concept standard. Site and facility electrical system components will include the following:

 Electrical site utility distribution

 Site & exterior building lighting

 Building interior general lighting

 Building interior device and Heating Ventilation Air & Conditioning (HVAC) power

 Building fire alarm system

 Building interior special systems telecommunication and security systems

 Lightning protection system Based on the program building square footage, it is estimated that a 1,600 Amp, 277/480V-3 Phase, 4 Wire electrical service will provide adequate electrical power for the project. Estimated load consumption is 13 volt-amperes per square foot for all of the MPE systems. The site utility distribution will include interface with the existing campus 12,470V-3 Phase medium voltage system network. A utility pad mounted transformer will be set on grade to the south of Blome street, next to the existing switch cabinets just north of Sechrist Hall. A network loop medium voltage configuration will serve the utility transformer. The building electrical service will be located on the south end of the first floor, and will include any provisions necessary for the addition of a future photovoltaic system (estimated at 180kW) if directed by the NAU Project Manager or Director of Project Development and Construction Manager. Both 480V and 208V panel boards will be located within the facility to serve various branch circuit requirements. The Main Electrical Room will be configured to meet NAU’s utility service access requirements. The Service Entrance Section (SES), automatic-transfer switches, and related transformers and panelboards will be located within the Main Electrical Room. The first floor of the building will be served from panelboards in a separate first floor electrical room, and the subsequent floors will each have their own smaller Electrical Rooms with the necessary equipment for each floor’s load.

Provisions for a master utility meter will be provided as part of the service entrance section. Individual smart meters will be included at each panelboard to monitor all lighting, power, and HVAC power loads if directed by NAU Electrical Department. All connected electrical loads will be designed to meet appropriate ASHRAE guidelines. An internal Surge Protective SPD will be provided within the main distribution switchboard as well as all sub-distribution panelboards.

The existing garage to the east of the new academics building is supplied with emergency power from a dedicated generator system. An analysis of this existing generator shows that there is not enough additional capacity to serve both the garage and the new academics building. Per the NAU request to provide capacity to run the elevators on emergency power, a source for emergency power will have to be found. An analysis of the site shows that the best option is to remove the existing garage generator and replace it with a generator and distribution equipment with capacity to serve both buildings. The new generator will handle all of the existing parking garage loads in addition to the NEC 700 lighting loads, the security system, and the fire alarm system. Additionally per NAU request, the pumps for the heating hot water system and snow melt system will be on emergency power. A preliminary generator size of 300kW has been determined from analysis of the existing parking garage and the new SAS building loads. Automatic transfer switches and emergency distribution equipment for the SAS building will be located within main electrical room and associated electrical rooms on each floor.

 

 

 

Page 2

The site and building lighting design will include site access, pedestrian walkway illumination, and interior general area lighting. Any emergency egress illumination required by the IBC and NFPA will be supplied as part of the NEC 700 Emergency System and connected to the emergency generator. Egress illumination will exceed the code minimum requirement of a 1.0 foot candle average and a 0.1 foot candle minimum for all egress pathways, including the exterior area adjacent to exit doorways.

Interior lighting will be controlled via occupancy/vacancy sensors with override off manual switches. In

large areas or spaces, ceiling or wall mounted combination dual technology sensors (infrared/ultrasonic or

micro-phonic) will be used. In smaller spaces, combination dual technology sensor type

(infrared/ultrasonic or micro-phonic) switches will be used. Daylighting compensation photocells will be

used where daylighting is available. In addition, low voltage relay control panels will control all lighting

branch circuits. Each lighting low voltage control panel relays will be controlled via the BAS as

independent points with ON/OFF status feedback to the BAS included.

Generally, LED lamp sources will be used in order to reduce energy consumption to meet the LEED

requirements. Luminaires with fluorescent lamp sources will be considered for all exterior and interior

lighting design solutions where LED fixtures are not practical or cost effective.

The lighting system will include the following general scope of work:

 All exterior and interior lighting design solutions will be per the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) recommended practices.

 Offsite street lighting requirements will be reviewed with NAU personnel regarding any additional integration requirements.

 Facility security lighting.

 Lighting fixtures shall comply with the City of Flagstaff Lighting Code, which includes dark sky criteria.

An appropriate number of branch circuits will serve general receptacle outlets throughout the facility. A single 120V branch circuit will serve a maximum of (6) six duplex receptacles in accordance with the NAU standard. All offices and classrooms will be designed with receptacle spacing at 6’-0” center to center spacing per the NAU standard. Dedicated branch circuits will be designed to support specialized Owner equipment as required. HVAC system equipment connections will include the following general scope of work:

 HVAC power connections will be provided for Air Handler Units (AHU), Variable Air Volume Units (VAV), Exhaust Fans (EF), and Ceiling Fans (CF) systems.

 Certain pumps have been requested to be on emergency power per NAU to keep certain systems operational to prevent freezing in case of a power outage. Final determination has yet to be made.

The building fire alarm system will meet all applicable codes as well as the NAU Fire Marshal requirements and will include the following general scope of work:

 Fire Alarm Control Panel (FACP) with battery backup.

 Fully automatic initiation coverage of the facility.

 Manual double action pull stations located at all exits and stairways.

 Smoke and heat initiation detectors.

 HVAC interface modules controlled via local area smoke detectors.

 Fire sprinkler standpipe tamper and flow sensors.

 Voice evacuation speaker audio devices and visual indicating devices located throughout the facility.

 Elevator recall interface.

 

 

 

Page 3

The building telecommunications and security systems will include data, fire alarm, and security systems design. The intercom/paging system will be integrated with the fire alarm system per NAU request, and the telephone system will be provided over VOIP. The VOIP system will be located in the Main Equipment Room (MER) Room. The VOIP handset will be used as the intercom access point into the fire alarm system.

Data wireless hubs will be indicated for 100% interior building coverage. Data drops will also be provided

within classrooms, offices, and computer labs. Multiple data/VOIP racks within the MER Room will be

designed per Owner direction. The terminal outlet with activation plate, conduit and/or basket tray raceway

system, including category 6e cabling will be routed to the MER data rack. Termination at the rack will be

at a patch panel. All data switches, patch cords, and additional rack mounted distribution equipment shall

be provided and installed as part of the project. The following telecommunications system components will

be included in the general scope of work:

 

 Basket tray system.

 Raceways with (3) Cat 6 cables down to drop boxes with cover plate and device RJ45 termination.

 Wireless access panels with POE power source.

 Security control panel.

 Intrusion and access control system components.

 CCTV cameras and video archiving DVR’s.

Lightning protection system

 The design of a lightning protection system will be based on the LPRA recommendations with consideration given by the Owner regarding the usage of the facility.

End of the Electrical Narrative.

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

Page 19 of 26

 

06. LEED CERTIFICATION SUMMARY

 

To set sustainability goals and to track and document the design and construction, the Project Team is utilizing LEED green building rating system. The project is being designed to achieve “Silver” rating for LEED New Construction 2009. The required for certifications documentation will be complete by the Team. If the project is to proceed with official LEED certification, it would have to be initiated through LEED online no later than June 2015.

The LEED requirements and optimum sustainable design solutions are being reviewed and

incorporated as the project progresses. The sustainable strategies and technologies are greatly influenced by the building location and constrains of the site:

 The site is located in the heart of the Campus in close proximity to transportation, services and centralized building utilities. Steam line and reclaimed water line will be extended to the building, eliminating necessity to construct additional utilities on site. Reclaimed water use and low-flow plumbing fixtures will significantly reduce use of potable water for the new facility. Building envelope, mechanical and electrical systems are designed to reduce use of energy and minimize impact on the planet.

 Healthy, comfortable and productive environment will be created for the building users and visitors. Reduced frontage of the building and almost due west orientation will limit access to daylight and views for some building users. Currently several approaches are being considered for bringing the daylight into the building.

 To provide for future building modifications all of the building services and connections are located together along the east side in a spline; which will allow for flexible and easy changes without major systems remodeling.

Refer to the proposed scorecard; and the detailed review of LEED credits for the project (Appendix 4).

 

 

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NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

Page 21 of 26

 

07. PROGRAM: SUMMARY OF SPACES

 

Table 1: Net assignable area.

The table is showing the summary of all net assignable areas. The original program given to the Design Team by NAU (January 30, 2014) is listed in the “Requested” column. The “Provided” column is based on the Schematic Design building layout. All area modifications and additional spaces were discussed with the User Groups during the programming stage of the project.

Requested Provided

# # People SF p/p Total NSF

SF p/p Total NSF

UG Admissions:

Auditorium + Storage 1 150 25 3,750 19 2,940

Reception/ Welcome Desk Area (4 people)

1 4-6 80 480 – 611

Lobby/Waiting area 1 50 25 1,250 – 2,114

Conference room 1 20 30 600 – 713

Director Office 1 1 160 160 – 160

Associate Director Office 1 1 160 160 – 160

Coordinator offices 3 1 120 360 – 360

Admissions Officers Offices 7 2 160 2,240 96 1,339

Break Room (shared w/ OSS Center)

1 – 200 200 – 273

Service room: (shared w/ OSS Center)

1 – 200 200 – 215

Additional Program

Interview Rooms 2 1 150 300 – 290

Storage Room (shared w/ OSS Center)

1 – 150 150 – 206

Student Worker Space 1 3 60 180 – 180

Total Admissions NASF 10,030 9,561

One-Stop Students Center:

Reception area 1 20 30 600 – 139

Waiting area lounge 1 100 25 2500 – 682

Check-in counter with ticketing system (pods)

5-8 1 120 960 – 1,906

Counseling offices 3 1 120 360 120 362

Director Office 1 1 160 160 – 160

Associate Director Office 1 1 160 160 – 160

Staff Support Offices 1 1 120 120 – 140

Vault – Small Safe in Staff Support Office

1 1 6 6 – –

Training room (shared w/ OSS Center)

1 30 35 1,050 36@ 20 748

Additional Program

Student Worker Space 1 6-8 part time 60 360 3×78 233

Total OSS Center NASF 6,276 4,530

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

Page 22 of 26

Requested Provided

# # People SF p/p Total NSF

SF p/p Total NSF

Math center:

Main Center 1 245 35 8,575 33 8,259

Classrooms 3 70 35 7,350 72@ 25 5,392

Computer Testing Lab 1 50 35 1,750 31 1,571

Conference Room 1 12-15 30 360 – 426

Tutorial Break Out Rooms 3 1 300 900 300+600 900

Undergraduate Tutors Lounge

1 15 30 450 – 488

Faculty Lounge 1 15 30 450 – 489

Director Office 1 1 160 160 – 160

Faculty Offices 2 3 60 360 – 400

Staff Offices 3 1 120 360 120 360

Students study rooms 10 1 100 1,000 104-160 1,253

Additional Program

Main Center Reception/ Help Desk

1 2-3 – 600 – 890

Course Coordinator Office 1 1 120 120 120 120

Vending 1 – – – – 193

Storage 1 1 200 200 – 178

Classroom Storage 3 – 15 45 – 71

Faculty Lounge Closet 1 – – 30 – 33

Total Math Center NASF 22,110 21,183

Academic Offices:

Chair’s Offices 4 1 160 640 160 640

Staff Support Offices 4 1 120 480 155 620

Faculty Offices 156 1 120 18,720 152@ 120 18,240

Service room: 1 per floor 2 1 200 400 120 240

Conference room (SM) 1 15 30 450 15@ 24 351

Conference rooms (MD) 2 25 (30) 30 1,500 25@ 24 1,220

Conference room (LG) 1 45 (50) 30 1,350 45@ 20 887

Faculty Lounge w/ Kitchenette

2 20 20 1,200 20@ 37

1,504

266

Additional Program

Admin Offices 4 2 60 480 63 500

Additional Service Room: per floor. Storage rooms.

2 1 200 400 120 240

Collaboration Spaces 8 – – – – 1,315

Lactation Room – – – – –

Total Offices NASF: 25,620 26,023

 

Total Building NASF 64,236 61,300

 

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

Page 23 of 26

Table 2: Non-assignable Circulation and Utility areas:

The table is showing the summary of all non-assignable areas. The spaces and the areas are based on the schematic building layout and the schematic building utilities design. As the design progresses, the square footage will be adjusted.

The non-assignable areas are divided into three categories: building utility rooms; building services (restrooms and janitor rooms); and the general building circulation (lobbies, vestibules, corridors and informal learning and social spaces).

Area SF Comments

Ground Floor:

Restrooms

Men’s Restroom 209

Women’s Restroom 261

Gender Neutral Restroom 94

Custodial Rooms

Janitor Closet 112

Ground Floor Services Total 676

Mechanical Rooms

Mechanical/ Storage 206 Mechanical chase above ceiling. Space available for building storage.

Mechanical/ Storage 213 Space available for building storage.

HX Room 621

Glycol Room 42 Equipment for the snow-melt system.

Electrical Rooms/ Closets

MDF 141

SES 394

Electrical 106

Ground Floor Utilities Total 1,723

Circulation

Stair – North 298 Calculated at Ground Floor only.

Stair – Grand Stair 245 Calculated at Ground Floor only.

Stair – South 86

Elevators Core 243 Calculated at Ground Floor only.

Main Lobby 1,687

General Circulation 1,940

Vestibule: One Stop Center 181

Vestibule: North Emergency Egress 191

Vestibule: Main Entrance 201

Ground Floor Circulation Total 5,072

 

Second Floor:

Restrooms

Men’s Restroom 232

Women’s Restroom 326

Custodial Rooms

Janitor Closet 110

Second Floor Services Total 668

Mechanical Rooms

Mechanical – Mechanical Chase

Mechanical – Mechanical Chase

Electrical Rooms/ Closets

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

Page 24 of 26

Area SF Comments

IDF 141

Electrical 143

Second Floor Utilities Total 284

Circulation

Stair – South 255 Calculated at Second Floor only.

General Circulation 5,481

Second Floor Circulation Total 5,736

 

Third Floor:

Restrooms

Men’s Restroom 190

Women’s Restroom 290

Shower Room 94

Custodial Rooms

Janitor Closet 111

Third Floor Services Total 685

Mechanical Rooms

Mechanical – Mechanical Chase

Mechanical – Mechanical Chase

Electrical Rooms/ Closets

IDF 141

Electrical 141

Third Floor Utilities Total 282

Circulation

Main Lobby 823

General Circulation 3,142

Third Floor Circulation Total 3,965

 

Fourth Floor:

Restrooms

Men’s Restroom 210

Women’s Restroom 262

Shower Room 94

Custodial Rooms

Janitor Closet 111

Fourth Floor Services Total 677

Mechanical Rooms

Mechanical – Mechanical Chase

Mechanical – Mechanical Chase

Electrical Rooms/ Closets

IDF 141

Electrical 142

Fourth Floor Utilities Total 283

Circulation

Main Lobby 768

General Circulation 3,151

Fourth Floor Circulation Total 3,919

 

Penthouse:

Total: 6,320

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

Page 25 of 26

Table 3: Net assignable and Gross area Calculations

Calculation of probable gross building areas. The GSF is calculated to the exterior of outside walls, with all of shafts, stairwells and elevator shafts excluded, except for ground floor area calculation. Penthouse level is excluded from the total building GSF.

Areas Area SF NASF GSF NASF to GSF

ratio

Ground Floor 14,094 23,312 1.65

Admissions 9,564

One –Stop Students Center

4,530

Building Services 676

Utilities 1,723

Circulation 5,072

Second Floor 21,183 29,789 1.41

Math Center 21,183

Building Services 668

Utilities 284

Circulation 5,736

Third Floor 13,012 20,144 1.55

Academic Offices 13,011

Building Services 685

Utilities 282

Circulation 3,965

 

Fourth Floor 13,011 20,094 1.55

Academic Offices 13,011

Building Services 667

Utilities 283

Circulation 3,919

 

Penthouse NA

Utilities 6,320

Total Building SF: 61,300 93,339 1.52

 

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

 

Appendix 1. ARCHITECTURAL OUTLINE SPECIFICATIONS

 

 

AMERICAN CAMPUS COMMUNITIES

NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY

STUDENT ACADEMIC SERVICES BUILDING

 

ARCHITECTURAL OUTLINE SPECIFICATIONS

TABLE OF CONTENTS PURPOSE

SECTION 00 31 32 – GEOTECHNICAL DATA

DIVISION 01 – GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

SECTION 01 11 00 – SUMMARY OF WORK

SECTION 01 11 16 – UNIVERSITY FURNISHED ITEMS AND WORK

SECTION 01 14 00 – WORK RESTRICTIONS

SECTION 01 18 13 – UTILITY SERVICE CONNECTIONS

SECTION 01 26 00 – CONTRACT MODIFICATION PROCEDURES

SECTION 01 29 00 – PAYMENT PROCEDURES

SECTION 01 31 00 – PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND COORDINATION

SECTION 01 32 00 – CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS DOCUMENTATION

SECTION 01 33 00 – SUBMITTAL PROCEDURES

SECTION 01 35 00 – SPECIAL PROCEDURES

SECTION 01 40 00 – QUALITY REQUIREMENTS

SECTION 01 42 00 – REFERENCES

SECTION 01 50 00 – TEMPORARY FACILITIES AND CONTROLS

SECTION 01 57 23 – TEMPORATRY STORM WATER POLLUTION CONTROL

SECTION 01 70 00 – EXECUTION AND CLOSEOUT REQUIREMENTS

SECTION 01 74 13 – PROGRESS CLEANING

SECTION 01 74 19 – CONSTRUCTION WASTE MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL SECTION 01 74 23 – FINAL CLEANING

SECTION 01 75 16 – STARTUP PROCEDURES

SECTION 01 78 23 – OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE DATA

SECTION 01 78 36 – WARRANTIES

SECTION 01 79 00 – DEMONSTRATION AND TRAINING SECTION 01 81 13 – SUSTAINABLE DESIGN REQUIREMENTS (LEED FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION) SECTION 01 91 13 – GENERAL COMMISSIONING REQUIREMENTS

 

DIVISION 02 – EXISTING CONDITIONS

 

SECTION 02 41 13 – SELECTIVE SITE DEMOLITION

DIVISION 03 – CONCRETE

 

SECTION 03 11 00 – CONCRETE FORMING

SECTION 03 20 00 – CONCRETE REINFORCING

SECTION 03 30 00 – CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE

 

DIVISION 04 – MASONRY

 

SECTION 04 05 00 – COMMON WORK RESULTS FOR MASONRY

SECTION 04 22 00 – CONCRETE UNIT MASONRY

SECTION 04 30 00 – MASONRY INSULATING FILL

 

 

DIVISION 05 – METALS

 

SECTION 05 12 00 – STRUCTURAL STEEL FRAMING

SECTION 05 21 00 – STEEL JOIST FRAMING SECTION 05 30 00 – METAL DECKING SECTION 05 36 00 – COMPOSITE METAL DECKING

SECTION 05 41 00 – STRUCTURAL METAL STUD FRAMING

SECTION 05 50 10 – METAL FABRICATIONS

SECTION 05 51 00 – METAL STAIRS

SECTION 05 52 00 – METAL RAILINGS

SECTION 05 73 13 – GLAZED DECORATIVE METAL RAILINGS

DIVISION 06 – WOOD, PLASTICS AND COMPOSITES

 

SECTION 06 10 53 – MISCELLANEOUS ROUGH CARPENTRY

SECTION 06 40 00 – ARCHITECTURAL WOODWORK SECTION 06 41 16 – PLASTIC-LAMINATE-CLAD ARCHITECTURAL CABINETS

SECTION 06 42 16 – SCULPTED WOOD PANELING

DIVISION 07 – THERMAL AND MOISTURE PROTECTION

SECTION 07 11 13 – BITUMINOUS DAMPPROOFING SECTION 07 13 26 – SELF-ADHERING SHEET WATERPROOFING

SECTION 07 19 00 – WATER REPELLENTS

SECTION 07 21 00 – THERMAL INSULATION

SECTION 07 22 16 – ROOF BOARD INSULATION

SECTION 07 26 00 – AIR BARRIERS SECTION 07 27 00 – AIR BARRIERS SECTION 07 42 13 – METAL WALL PANELS

SECTION 07 54 16 – ETHYLENE INTERPOLYMER (KEE) ROOFING

SECTION 07 61 13 – STANDING SEAM SHEET METAL ROOFING

SECTION 07 62 00 – SHEET METAL FLASHING AND TRIM SECTION 07 81 00 – APPLIED FIREPROOFING

SECTION 07 84 13 – PENETRATION FIRESTOPPING

SECTION 07 92 00 – JOINT SEALANTS SECTION 07 95 00 – EXPANSION CONTROL

 

DIVISION 08 – OPENINGS

 

SECTION 08 12 13 – HOLLOW METAL FRAMES

SECTION 08 13 13 – HOLLOW METAL DOORS

SECTION 08 14 16 – FLUSH WOOD DOORS

SECTION 08 31 13 – ACCESS DOORS AND FRAMES

SECTION 08 33 26 – OVERHEAD COILING GRILLES

SECTION 08 41 13 – ALUMINUM-FRAMED ENTRANCES AND STOREFRONT

SECTION 08 51 13 – ALUMINUM WINDOWS

SECTION 08 63 00 – METAL FRAMED SKYLIGHTS

SECTION 08 71 00 – DOOR HARDWARE

SECTION 08 80 00 – GLAZING

SECTION 08 83 00 – MIRRORS SECTION 08 87 33 – DECORATIVE FILMS

SECTION 08 91 19 – FIXED LOUVERS

 

 

 

DIVISION 09 – FINISHES

 

SECTION 09 21 16 – GYPSUM BOARD ASSEMBLIES

SECTION 09 21 23 – GYPSUM SHAFT WALL ASSEMBLIES

SECTION 09 22 13 – METAL FURRING

SECTION 09 22 16 – NON-STRUCTURAL METAL FRAMING SECTION 09 30 00 – TILING

SECTION 09 51 13 – ACOUSTICAL PANEL CEILINGS

SECTION 09 61 00 – FLOORING TREATMENT (SEALERS)

SECTION 09 65 13 – RESILIENT BASE AND ACCESSORIES

SECTION 09 65 16 – RESILIENT SHEET FLOORING SECTION 09 65 19 – RESILIENT TILE FLOORING

SECTION 09 66 23 – RESINOUS MATRIX TERRAZZO FLOORING (EPOXY-RESIN)

SECTION 09 68 13 – TILE CARPETING

SECTION 09 72 00 – WALL COVERINGS

SECTION 09 81 00 – ACOUSTIC INSULATION

SECTION 09 84 33 – SOUND ABSORBING WALL UNITS

SECTION 09 91 00 – PAINTING

 

DIVISION 10 – SPECIALTIES

 

SECTION 10 11 16 – MARKERBOARDS

SECTION 10 14 00 – SIGNAGE

SECTION 10 21 13 – TOILET COMPARTMENTS

SECTION 10 22 26 – OPERABLE PARTITIONS

SECTION 10 26 13 – CORNER GUARDS

SECTION 10 28 00 – TOILET, BATH AND LAUNDRY ACCESSORIES

SECTION 10 44 13 – FIRE PROTECTION CABINETS

SECTION 10 51 13 – METAL LOCKERS

SECTION 10 56 16 – FABRICATED WOOD STORAGE SHELVING

 

DIVISION 11 – EQUIPMENT

 

SECTION 11 14 13 – TURNSTILES

SECTION 11 17 26 – CASH DROP SAFE

SECTION 11 31 00 – RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES

SECTION 11 52 13 – PROJECTION SCREENS SECTION 11 52 16 – PROJECTORS

 

DIVISION 12 – FURNISHINGS

 

SECTION 12 21 13 – HORIZONTAL LOUVER BLINDS

SECTION 12 22 00 – CURTAINS AND DRAPES

SECTION 12 36 61 – SIMULATED STONE COUNTERTOPS SECTION 12 48 13 – ENTRANCE FLOOR MATS

SECTION 12 61 00 – FIXED AUDIENCE SEATING

SECTION 12 93 13 –BICYCLE RACKS SECTION 12 93 43 – SITE SEATING

DIVISION 13 – SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION

(Not Used)

 

 

 

 

DIVISION 14 – CONVEYING EQUIPMENT

 

SECTION 14 21 13 – MACHINE ROOM-LESS FREIGHT ELEVATORS

SECTION 14 21 23 – MACHINE ROOM-LESS PASSENGER ELEVATORS

 

DIVISION 31 – EARTHWORK

SECTION 31 10 00 – SITE CLEARING SECTION 31 20 00 – EARTH MOVING SECTION 31 31 16 – TERMITE CONTROL

 

 

 

 

 

 

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AMERICAN CAMPUS COMMUNITIES

NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY STUDENT ACADEMIC SERVICES BUILDING

ARCHITECTURAL OUTLINE SPECIFICATIONS

PURPOSE The purpose of the outline specifications is to provide additional information to the Construction Cost Estimator and to indicate a level of quality of the materials and products for construction. It is not a selection of the products at this phase of design. It is to indicate the intentions of the Design Team for review and discussion. Additionally, the intent is to indicate options and to initiate discussion of the required items for the building project.

The final selections of materials and products have not been made and alternate manufacturers have not been identified

The Construction Documents will contain specifications providing intended selections with detail requirements and alternate manufacturer’s.

SECTION 00 31 32 – GEOTECHNICAL DATA 1. Geotechnical data is available to provide information for Contractor and subcontractor

convenience and is intended to supplement rather than serve in lieu of Contractor’s and subcontractor’s own investigations. They are made available for Contractor’s and subcontractor’s convenience and information, but are not a warranty of existing conditions. This Document and its attachments are not part of the Contract Documents.

a. Report on Geotechnical Investigation, by Speedie and Associates NAU San Francisco Garage NWC San Francisco Street & Blome Drive NAU Parking Lot ‘P-28’ Flagstaff, Arizona Project No. 110250SF April 11, 2011 Addendum No. 1, September 26, 2011. Addendum No. 2, July 14, 2011. Addendum No. 3, October 18, 2011. Addendum No. 4, November 22, 2011. Addendum No. 5, March 24, 2014.

 

DIVISION 01 – GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

SECTION 01 11 00 – SUMMARY OF WORK 2. The Work of the Contract shall include all work indicated or specified unless the work is

specifically indicated as “Not in Contract”. Also included is all work which may be necessary to provide water, sewer, telephone and electrical service to the tenant improvement area, including cutting and patching of existing materials to match the original “like new” condition and to meet the requirements of governing municipal authorities.

 

 

 

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3. The Work includes but is not limited to construction of the new 93,378 sq. ft. Student Academic Services Building on the campus of Northern Arizona University.

4. The word “shown”, “indicated”, “noted”, “scheduled”, or words of like effect shall be understood to

mean that reference is made to the Drawings. 5. The NAU shall have the right to occupy portions of the site that are completed on or after the

specified completion date (even though the Contractor may not have completed the entire Project). Such occupancy by the NAU will not release the Contractor (or bonding agency) form warranties or guarantees and final completion of work in accordance with the Contract documents.

SECTION 01 11 16 – UNIVERSITY FURNISHED ITEMS AND WORK 6. This Section describes the responsibilities of the Contractor regarding NAU-furnished equipment

and work by others.

7. The NAU reserves the right to award other contracts related to the Project, or to perform certain work itself. Such other work may or may not be known to NAU or disclosed to the Contractor prior to execution of the Agreement. The Contractor shall afford NAU and such other contractors reasonable opportunity for the introduction and storage of their materials and equipment and the execution of their work, and shall properly coordinate its Work with theirs in such manner as NAU or Architect may direct. The Contractor shall also assure at its own cost reasonable access of other contractors to their site and their work.

8. It shall be the Contractor’s responsibility to coordinate installation of the equipment or system with all other trades. Any problems noted shall be brought to the attention of the Architect. This notification must be submitted in writing and no claims for additional work shall be considered unless the request for clarification has been initiated by the Contractor in a timely fashion.

9. The following notations are used throughout the Contract Documents. An explanation of each of these notations is described as follows:

a. OFCI – Owner-furnished/Contractor-installed. b. CFCI – Contractor-furnished/Contractor-installed. c. OFOI – Owner-furnished/Owner-installed.

10. OFCI – The Contractor shall be responsible for the receiving and provision of all rough-in

services, installation and testing of the equipment or system provided by NAU. The Contractor shall receive, inventory, verify quantity and condition and notify NAU. The Contractor, within 15 days of bid awarding, shall provide NAU and Architect with delivery dates of all NAU-furnished / Contractor-installed items.

11. CFCI – In general, the Contractor shall be responsible for the ordering, receiving, storing, protecting, installing and testing of the equipment or system. All items and systems are Contractor-furnished/Contractor-installed unless noted otherwise.

12. OFOI – NAU will be responsible for furnishing and installing the equipment or system. The Contractor shall only be required to furnish the rough-ins as shown on the Contract Documents and to provide blocking or other necessary support. The Contractor shall be responsible that work provided under the Contract Documents does not interfere with the installation of Owner- furnished/Owner-installed materials or equipment.

13. N.I.C. – Certain items of equipment or elements of the construction may be excluded from the Contract, and if so, are indicated on the Drawings N.I.C. (not in contract). Installation of these items may be performed while the Contractor’s Work is in progress. NAU has the right to begin installation of these elements prior to the acceptance or Substantial Completion of the Work as a whole. The Contractor shall cooperate with NAU to facilitate the expeditious installation of such items.

 

 

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14. Obtain from the equipment supplier all shop and manufacturer’s assembly and installation drawings for Owner-furnished equipment. Items noted on the Drawings but not listed in this section shall be included under this heading.

15. Provide NAU written notice of starting dates when Owner-furnished/Contractor-installed items must be received at the job site to insure project completion in accordance with the established schedule. This request for Owner-furnished items shall be on stationary bearing the General Contractor’s letterhead and signature. This list shall be submitted to NAU’s Representative and Architect within 15 days of awarding of the bid, to permit proper action on same such that no delay occurs due to required lead time in ordering or delivery to the job site.

16. Certain equipment, fixtures, etc., are indicated on the Drawings to be furnished by NAU for assembly by the Contractor. NAU will be responsible for delivery of NAU-furnished items to the construction site. The Contractor shall assume responsibility for such acceptance of the new facility by NAU. Assembly and installation shall include unloading, uncrating, setting in place, leveling, connection to utilities, the furnishing of required operating oils, and fluids, and such other procedures as may be required to render the equipment and fixtures serviceable and operative. Assembly and installation shall be performed in accordance with shop and manufacturer’s assembly and installation drawings.

17. Furnish the documents required by NAU substantiating the receipt of Owner-furnished equipment within 10 days of delivery.

18. Other Construction activities, under the direct supervision of NAU, are anticipated in the same area of work during the construction period established for this Agreement. Both NAU’s activities and the Contractor’s work may be in progress at the same time and shall have equal rights to use the roads, grounds, areas, etc. Coordinate activities which come into conflict. No request for additional compensation for any reason, in this connection, will be considered.

19. Equipment and materials that will be furnished by NAU:

a. Telephone and Computer network system will be OFOI. b. Telephone and Computer network cabling will be CFCI. c. Vending machines will be OFOI. d. Trash Receptacles will be OFOI. e. Defibulator (AED) will be OFCI.

20. Other Construction activities, under the direct supervision of NAU, are anticipated in the same

area of work during the construction period established for this Agreement. Both NAU’s activities and the Contractor’s work may be in progress at the same time and shall have equal rights to use the roads, grounds, areas, etc. Coordinate activities which come into conflict.

SECTION 01 14 00 – WORK RESTRICTIONS 21. Truck washing stations, truck tire scraping grates and street sweeping may be required. Access

to site shall be provided as to keep construction activity, dirt and mud on site. 22. Communication with occupants of adjacent buildings is to be sent through the NAU Project

Manager. Impact requests should be requested a minimum of 72 hours prior to the proposed starting time. Requests may not be approved and may be rescheduled to meet occupant needs.

23. Use of the site is restricted to materials and equipment necessary to completion of the Work. It is the contractor’s responsibility to ensure enclosure of the site from the general public.

SECTION 01 18 13 – UTILITY SERVICE CONNECTIONS 24. The Contractor shall prearrange time with the Architect and Owner whenever it becomes

necessary to interrupt any service to make connections, alterations or relocations and shall fully cooperate with NAU in doing Work so as to cause the least annoyance and interference with the

 

 

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continuous operation of NAU’s business or official duties. Existing plumbing, heating, ventilating, air conditioning or electrical disconnections which may affect portions of existing buildings or other construction projects must be coordinated with the Architect and Owner. In no case, unless previously approved in writing by Owner, shall utilities be left disconnected at the end of a work day or over a weekend. Any interruption of utilities shall be reported immediately to the NAU Project Manager. Such interruptions, whether negligently, intentionally, or accidentally, shall not relieve the Contractor’s responsibility for the interruption or from liability for loss or damage caused by such interruption even though such loss or damage was not foreseeable by Contractor or subcontractor, or from responsibility for repairing and restoring the utility to normal service. Repairs and restoration shall be made before the Contractor leaves the project site.

SECTION 01 26 00 – CONTRACT MODIFICATION PROCEDURES 25. Requests for Interpretation (RFI) will be sent electronically the NAU Project Manager and the

Architect concurrently. The RFI must indicate the NAU project number, RFI number, specification section and drawing sheet impacted, trades involved, images if applicable, a proposed solution and potential cost or time impact.

26. A construction change directive (CCD) may only be used at Owner’s discretion when the identified

field change must be completed before a formal change order can be issued to the Contractor. The Contractor shall provide NAU a description of the required change and a not to exceed value. When signed by NAU and Design Professional and received by the Contractor, the CCD becomes effective immediately and the contractor shall proceed with the change(s) described. The appropriate adjustments to the contract will be made through a change order amendment. Actual costs must be fully substantiated before an amendment will be issued.

27. No changes in the work shall be undertaken by the Contractor without written direction by NAU or

Architect. Any changes made without such written direction are done so at the Contractor’s own risk. Change Orders shall be processed as identified in the construction agreement.

28. Change procedures must follow the requirements outlined in the Construction Agreement

Between Owner and Contractor. SECTION 01 29 00 – PAYMENT PROCEDURES 29. Schedule of Values: Individual construction activities which are indicated by the Schedule of

Values shall coincide with activities presented on the Contractor’s Construction Schedule. Contractor shall submit proposed schedule of values for review and approval by Architect and by Owner, per the Construction Agreement between Owner and Contractor, prior to submission of first pay application.

30. Contractor shall submit payments electronically to the Project Manager, Architect and Owner’s

Designated Contracts Administrator concurrently and then follow up with a physical copy to the Project Manager. Payments will be measured against the Schedule of Values as approved by the Architect and Owner.

31. For all Testing and Inspection Services, the Testing and Inspection Log shall be completed and shall accompany each pay app for that billing period.

SECTION 01 31 00 – PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND COORDINATION 32. Facility Services Coordination: NAU Facility Services will provide an emergency contact sheet to

the Contractor with contacts for the different departments in Facilities. The Contractor will fill out with their emergency numbers and return to the NAU for distribution.

33. Schedule a preconstruction meeting with NAU Facility Services.

34. Coordinate blue staking with NAU Blue Stake Coordinator prior to starting work.

 

 

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35. Progress Meetings: Conduct progress meetings on a weekly basis.

36. Pre-installation Meetings: The contractor shall schedule a pre‐installation meeting before starting each major trade, between the Inspector, General Contractor and Subcontractor. For projects over

$100,000 schedule a 10 ‐ 15% Installation Completion Meeting to verify proper installation practices are implemented. The pre‐installation meeting will review the inspection protocol and review project specifications and drawings with the General Contractor and Subcontractor. The pre-installation meetings, to be scheduled the same day of the weekly construction meeting, shall be specified when applicable:

 

a. Concrete formwork and placing

b. Waterproofing

c. Mortar / masonry

d. Flashing

e. Roofing

f. Sealant

g. Vapor Barrier

h. Sprinklers

i. Ductwork

j. Painting SECTION 01 32 00 – CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS DOCUMENTATION 37. Immediately after execution and delivery of the Contract and before the first partial payment is

made, the Contractor shall deliver to the Architect, a Construction Progress Schedule in a form satisfactory to the Architect, showing the proposed dates of commencement and completion of each of the various subdivisions of the work required under the Contract Documents.

38. The Contractor shall submit a schedule of the anticipated monthly payments that will become due

in accordance with the Progress Schedule. 39. Submit an itemized breakdown of the costs of the various subdivisions of the work for the

purpose of evaluating the work completed during the preceding month and indicate any revisions to the Construction Progress Schedule.

40. Submit monthly, an updated Progress Report indicating work completed during the preceding

month and indicate any revisions to the Construction Progress Schedule. 41. Approval of Phasing: NAU reserves the right to review and approve scheduling or phasing of

construction activities which have an impact on University functions or operations. Advise NAU when phases are indicated by the schedule. Act to lessen or avert impact to University operations through alternative phasing of activities or other measures.

42. Procurement Schedule: In addition to the Construction Schedule, NAU requires a Procurement

Schedule for all major project components to be purchased and incorporated by the Contractor into the Project. The Procurement Schedule shall indicate scheduled delivery of major Project components, both equipment and materials, in support of the activities included on the Contractor’s Construction Schedule.

43. Provide a submittal schedule prior to the first payment request.

44. Daily Log: Maintain a daily log current during entire construction period. 45. Photographic Documentation: NAU requires photos of the project submitted electronically with

pay applications. The number of photos and views will be determined by NAU.

 

 

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SECTION 01 33 00 – SUBMITTAL PROCEDURES 46. Furnish to the Architect, for review, electronic copies (by e-mail) of each sheet of shop drawings

and schedules for parts of the work as required. Architect shall return reviewed copy (by e-mail). Contractor shall make additional copies as required from reviewed copy for distribution to subcontractors.

47. All such drawings and details, when submitted, must bear the stamp of approval of Contractor,

bearing checked data, as evidence that such drawings and details have been checked. 48. Submit electronic copy (e-mail) of a complete list of all major items of mechanical, plumbing, and

electrical equipment and materials. Submittals shall include the manufacturer’s specifications, physical dimensions and ratings of all equipment. Furnish performance curves for all pumps and fans. Where submittal sheet describes items in addition to that item being submitted, the submitted item shall be clearly marked on the sheet and superfluous information shall be crossed out.

49. Do not deliver material to the building site prior to receipt of Architect’s written approval of

samples. Furnish materials equal in every respect to approved samples and execute work in conformity.

SECTION 01 35 00 – SPECIAL PROCEDURES 50. Security Procedures: Contractor is responsible for securing access to construction areas to

prevent damage or theft. This may include, but is not limited to, securing site fencing, temporary construction and building entrances. After hours and work within tunnels shall be coordinated with NAU and NAU Police Department.

SECTION 01 40 00 – QUALITY REQUIREMENTS 51. Work performed on or within the boundaries of the Northern Arizona University campus shall be

subject to special inspections, periodic inspections, Code compliance inspections, and pre‐occupancy or final inspections by the following agencies as applicable:

a. State Fire Marshal’s Office (Fire alarm, sprinkler systems, underground fire lines and

automatic extinguishing systems). b. Arizona Corporation Commission (Gas line installation). c. State Risk Management Division. d. City of Flagstaff (for utilities installations that cross campus boundaries). e. State Elevator Inspector (Elevator installations). f. State Boiler Inspector (Boiler installations). g. NAU Facility Services, Planning, Design and Construction. h. NAU Facility Services, Operations / Maintenance Inspectors. i. NAU Facility Services, Lead Building Inspector. j. NAU Office of Regulatory Compliance. k. NESHAP

 

52. Provide a complete copy of the construction plans, specifications and other pertinent documents as necessary for review and approval by the NAU Fire Life Safety Division (FLS) and NAU Lead Building Inspector.

 

53. Construction shall not commence until the Contractor receives from NAU‐FLS and NAU Lead Building Inspector the approved stamped copy of the construction plans, permit, and other

documents provided. 54. Contractor shall be responsible for performing all tests, unless noted otherwise. 55. Code Conformance: If a conflict is found between a Code requirement and information given

in written or graphic specifications, Contractor will abide by the more stringent of the two. Such

 

 

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conflict shall be reported in writing to the Architect, to NAU FLS Division and NAU Lead Building Inspector.

56. Make utility staking requests for the project to both Bluestake Central at 1‐800‐STAKE‐IT and Facility Services at 523‐4227. Requests are given a log number. Maintain that number for future reference.

57. Testing and Inspection Services: Reinforcing steel or structural framework of any part of any building or structure shall not be covered or concealed without first obtaining approval of the Architect.

a. Foundation Inspection: Shall be made after excavations for footings are complete and any required reinforcing steel is in place. For concrete foundations, any required forms shall be in place prior to inspection.

b. Concrete Slab or Under‐Floor Inspection: Shall be made after all in‐slab or under‐floor building service equipment, conduit, piping accessories and other ancillary equipment items are in place, but before any concrete is placed or floor

sheathing installed, including the sub‐floor. c. Frame and Rough‐In Mechanical, Plumbing and Electrical Inspection: Shall be made

after the roof, structural framing, fire blocking and bracing are in place and pipes, and vents are complete and the rough electrical, plumbing, and heating, pipes and ducts, and fire sprinkler piping are approved.

d. Gypsum Board Inspection: Shall be made after l lathing and gypsum board, interior and exterior, is in place but before any plastering is applied or before gypsum board joints and fasteners are taped and finished.

e. Substantial Completion Inspection: Prior to issuance of the Substantial Completion Certificate, in-progress inspections shall be passed. Schedule a walkthrough with each trade inspector individually to sign off on substantial completion provide a punch list.

f. Final Completion Inspection: Prior to Final Payment schedule an additional walk with each trade inspector to ensure that punch work is completed and inspected, and required inspections are passed.

SECTION 01 42 00 – REFERENCES 58. Industry Organizations: Where abbreviations and acronyms are used in Specifications or other

Contract Documents, they shall mean the recognized name of the entities indicated in Gale Research’s “Encyclopedia of Associations” or in Columbia Books’ “National Trade & Professional Associations of the U.S.”

SECTION 01 50 00 – TEMPORARY FACILITIES AND CONTROLS 59. The Contractor shall provide a staging plan/site logistic plan at the preconstruction meeting.

The staging plan shall clearly identify the following items:

a. Construction Trailer. b. Material Staging. c. Wash down areas (concrete, mud, etc.). d. Dumpsters. e. Traffic Control including signals and barricades. f. Signage. g. Site Fencing including gate locations and height of the fence. h. Site Access for contractors, material delivery and waste hauling. i. Sanitary Facilities. j. Temporary Utilities. k. Temporary Parking. l. SWPPP measures. m. ADA accessible routes. n. Pedestrian/bikes routes.

 

 

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o. Vehicle routes. p. Emergency Access

60. Provide temporary adequate light and power supply for construction, making all necessary

arrangements with serving utility and paying all expenses in connection therewith. Temporary lighting illumination level shall be adequate to permit workmen to properly perform their work.

61. Provide temporary adequate water supply for construction, making all necessary arrangements

with serving utility and paying all expenses in conjunction therewith. 62. Supply adequate cool, pure drinking water with individual drinking cups or sanitary bubbler

fountain for the use of employees on the project. The quality of the drinking water shall meet the standards for public water supplies of the Coconino County Health Department.

63. Provide and pay for installation of a job telephone, paying local service charges involved, for the

duration of the Contract. 64. Provide proper sanitary and adequate toilet facilities for the use of workers employed on the

Project, located where directed, and enforce their use by personnel on the project. Enclose and weatherproof toilets and keep in a sanitary condition at all times.

65. Provide adequate fire extinguishers on the premises during the course of construction, of the type

and sizes recommended by the NFPA to control fires resulting from the particular work being performed.

66. Provide and maintain fences, barricades, lights, shoring and other protective structures or devices

necessary for the safety of workmen, equipment, the public and property as required by state or municipal laws and regulations, and local ordinances, laws and other requirements of the county, state and other authorities having jurisdiction with regard to safety precautions, operations and fire hazards.

67. Provide and maintain pumping facilities, including power for keeping the site, excavations and

structure free from accumulations of water, whether from underground seepage, rainfall, drainage or broken lines.

68. Provide security fencing acceptable to Owner around the construction area. Fencing shall be

erected and secured in manner to withstand the forces to which it may be subjected. 69. Protect stored elements of construction from any danger of damage from wind, rain, dust, frost, or

other infiltration of weather. 70. Exercise all possible care to control excessive noise and dust during the construction to keep

these problems to a minimum. Dust control is the Contractor’s responsibility at no additional cost to NAU. The Contractor shall address complaints regarding dust control within four (4) hours. Air, water, surface, and subgrade conditions shall be protected from pollution by the Contractor. Such protection requirements as detailed in all State and Federal regulations shall apply. ADEQ, OSHA, and NAU Office of Regulatory Compliance may inspect for compliance without notice.

71. Furnish and erect, where directed, a project sign, the design shall be obtained from the Architect,

painted 2 coats of paint, giving the name of the Project Owner, Architects, Engineers and Contractor. Sign painting shall involve 4 colors of paint. No other signs will be permitted on the Project Site. Sign shall meet NAU requirements for temporary signs.

72. Provide and maintain a weather tight office for the use of NAU, Architect, and Contractor. This

office shall be provided with windows which operate and doors with locks, tables, benches, racks for Drawings, electric lights, and telephones and shall be heated.

 

 

 

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73. Temporary Access Roads: Optimum truck routes and access roads, including fire department

access, to the Project site shall be identified at the pre‐construction conference and noted in the site logistics plan.

74. Vehicles parking within campus boundaries shall display permits. Vehicles without permits

will be ticketed by the NAU Police Department. Vehicles parked within the fenced staging / storage area, identified on the Construction Documents, do require parking permits. Contractor shall make a written request to the NAU representative at the preconstruction meeting for parking permits for all vehicles to be parked within the campus boundaries. NAU Parking Services will attempt to meet requests for specific parking areas, however, due to availability; alternative parking areas may be assigned. Storage / Staging areas shall be requested in writing to the NAU representative prior to the start of construction.

75. Traffic Control: Coordinate with the Facility Services Project Manager and obtain approval from:

NAU Parking Services, NAU Shuttle Services, NAU Police Department, NAU Fire Marshal, NAU Office of Regulatory Compliance and City of Flagstaff Fire Department.

76. Staging Areas: Submit a site logistics plan at the preconstruction meeting. Storage / Staging

Areas shall be maintained and returned to the condition they were in prior to occupation by the Contractor. Patch, repair or replace damaged areas upon completion of the work. The area shall receive final inspection and approval by NAU prior to final payment.

77. Temporary Tree and Plant Protection: Existing trees and plants indicated to remain shall be fenced outside the drip line (this includes memorial trees). Construction activity shall not occur within fenced area. Provide site maintenance and control of erosion, weeds, snow, debris, etc. Irrigation is not a standard part of the blue stake procedure. The contractor is responsible for coordinating with NAU Grounds to determine location of irrigation lines prior to start of

construction. The contractor shall be responsible for relocating/repairing any irrigation equipment. SECTION 01 57 23 – TEMPORATRY STORM WATER POLLUTION CONTROL

78. Although this project is not of sufficient size to require compliance with the National Pollutant

Discharge Elimination System requirements for erosion control during construction, provide a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) for the project. Implement the SWPPP, including verification of compliance form.

79. Implement the SWPPP at the onset of rainfall, such that 80 percent of the construction related

sediment which is generated from storm water runoff within the project site is eliminated.

80. Revise the SWPPP as necessary throughout the duration of the Contract. Submit revisions to the SWPPP to NAU for approval prior to implementation.

SECTION 01 70 00 – EXECUTION AND CLOSEOUT REQUIREMENTS 81. Record Drawings: Maintain a set of Contract Drawings as Record Drawings. Mark to show

installation that varies from the Work originally shown. 82. Operation and Maintenance Data: Organize data into 3-ring binders, with pocket folders for

folded sheet information. Mark identification on front and spine of each binder. Include the following:

a. Emergency instructions. b. Spare parts list. c. Copies of warranties. d. Wiring diagrams. e. Shop Drawings and Product Data.

83. Examine substrates and conditions for compliance with manufacturer’s written requirements

including, but not limited to, surfaces that are sound, level, and plumb; substrates within

 

 

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installation tolerances; surfaces that are smooth, clean, and free of deleterious substances; and application conditions within environmental limits. Do not proceed with installation until unsatisfactory conditions have been corrected.

84. Prepare substrates and adjoining surfaces according to manufacturer’s written instructions,

including, but not limited to, the application of fillers and primers. 85. Cutting and Patching: Do not cut structural members without prior written approval of Architect. 86. For patching, provide materials whose installed performance will equal or surpass that of existing

materials. For exposed surfaces, provide or finish materials to visually match existing adjacent surfaces to the fullest extent possible.

87. Comply with manufacturer’s written instructions for installation. Anchor each product securely in

place, accurately located and aligned. Clean exposed surfaces and protect from damage. If applicable, prepare surfaces for field finishing.

88. Comply with NFPA 70 for installation of electrically operated equipment and electrical

components and materials. 89. Clean each surface or item as follows before requesting inspection for certification of Substantial

Completion:

a. Remove labels that are not permanent. b. Clean transparent materials, including mirrors. Remove excess glazing compounds.

Replace chipped or broken glass. c. Clean exposed finishes to a dust-free condition, free of stains, films, and foreign

substances. Leave concrete floors broom clean. d. Vacuum carpeted surfaces and wax resilient flooring. e. Wipe surfaces of mechanical and electrical equipment. Remove excess lubrication.

Clean plumbing fixtures. Clean light fixtures and lamps. f. Clean the site. Sweep paved areas; remove stains, spills, and foreign deposits.

Rake grounds to a smooth, even-textured surface. 90. Upon receipt of a request for inspection, Architect will proceed with inspection or advise

Contractor of unfilled requirements. Architect will prepare the Certificate of Substantial Completion after inspection or advise Contractor of items that must be completed or corrected before the certificate will be issued.

91. Arrange for each installer of equipment that requires operation and maintenance to provide

instruction to Owner’s personnel. Include a detailed review of the following:

a. Startup and shutdown. b. Emergency operations and safety procedures. c. Noise and vibration adjustments. d. Maintenance manuals. e. Spare parts, tools, and materials. f. Lubricants and fuels. g. Identification systems. h. Control sequences. i. Hazards. j. Warranties and bonds.

SECTION 01 74 13 – PROGRESS CLEANING 92. Maintain work and staging areas in a clean and orderly condition to enhance the safety and

appearance of the jobsite. Accumulations of refuse will not be permitted except as specifically approved in writing by NAU.

 

 

 

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SECTION 01 74 19 – CONSTRUCTION WASTE MANAGEMENT AND DISPOSAL 93. Provide proper and adequate trash containers at no additional cost to NAU. Containers shall

be emptied at regular intervals so that trash is not allowed to overflow or collect around the dump area.

94. Placing trash or debris in a University trash container is expressly forbidden. Contractor shall be responsible for costs incurred by NAU for the removal of trash placed in University trash containers.

95. Salvage nonhazardous construction waste.

96. Recycle nonhazardous construction waste.

97. General: Achieve end-of-Project rates for salvage/recycling of 75 percent by weight of total non-

hazardous solid waste generated by the Work. Practice efficient waste management in the use of materials in the course of the Work. Use all reasonable means to divert construction and demolition waste from landfills and incinerators

98. Disposing of nonhazardous construction waste.

99. Submit a Waste Management Plan according to ASTM D 1609 prior to start of on-site construction including, but not limited to, the following:

a. Types and quantities of construction waste. b. Type of waste and whether it will be salvaged, recycled, or disposed of in landfill or

incinerator. c. Net additional cost or net savings resulting from waste management plan.

100. Engage a waste management coordinator.

101. Train workers, subcontractors, and suppliers on proper waste management procedures. SECTION 01 74 23 – FINAL CLEANING 102. Provide final cleaning of the Work prior to NAU occupancy. Final cleaning shall mean cleaning

each surface or unit of work to conditions expected in a first‐class building and maintenance program. Comply with manufacturer’s instructions for cleaning operations. Cleaning shall include, but not be limited to, the following as applicable:

a. Clean transparent/reflective surfaces to a polished, streak free condition including

all mirrors, windows and door glass. Remove paint, putty, labels or other vision obscuring materials. Replace any broken or damaged surfaces.

b. Remove marks, stains, fingerprints, other soil and dirt from painted, decorated or stained work.

c. Clean polish woodwork as preferred by NAU. d. Clean light fixtures and lamps so as to function at full efficiency. Remove dirt,

dust, fingerprints, excess lubrication, drywall, paint etc. and non‐ permanent labels.

e. Wipe clean mechanical and electrical equipment; remove excess lubrication and other substances.

f. Clean exposed interior and exterior surface finishes to condition free of dirt, dust, stains, films or other noticeable distracting substance.

g. Clean exterior and interior metal surfaces, including doors and windows, of oil, stains, dust, dirt, paint and the like.

h. Clean and polish hard floors, remove dirt, material or water stains, scratches etc.; clean and vacuum carpeted areas.

i. Clean plumbing fixtures to polished, sanitary condition free of stains including those resulting from water.

 

 

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j. Except as otherwise indicated or requested by NAU, remove temporary protection devices and facilities which were installed during the course of the work.

103. Make building ready for occupancy in all respects. Protect cleaned areas until final inspection

and acceptance. SECTION 01 75 16 – STARTUP PROCEDURES 104. The Preliminary Balance Report shall have been submitted by the Contractor to NAU prior to,

and as a requirement of, Substantial Completion. 105. The Final Balance Report shall have been submitted to the NAU prior to, and as a

requirement of, Final Completion.

106. Systems start‐up, commissioning, and balancing shall be 100% complete prior to, and as a requirement of, Final Completion.

SECTION 01 78 23 – OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE DATA

107. Emergency, operation and maintenance manuals.

108. Format:

a. PDF electronic files with composite electronic index on digital media acceptable to

Architect. Include a complete electronically linked operation and maintenance directory.

b. Heavy-duty, three-ring, vinyl-covered, loose-leaf binders, one set(s) of copies

109. Emergency Manuals: Types of emergencies, emergency instructions, and emergency procedures.

110. Operation Manuals: System, subsystem, and equipment descriptions, operating procedures, wiring diagrams, control diagrams and sequence of operation, and piped system diagrams.

111. Product Maintenance Manuals: Source information, product information, maintenance procedures, repair materials and sources, and warranties and bonds.

112. Systems and Equipment Maintenance Manuals: Source information, manufacturers’ maintenance documentation, maintenance procedures, maintenance and service schedules, spare parts list and source information, maintenance service contracts, and warranties and bonds.

SECTION 01 78 36 – WARRANTIES 113. Contractor’s Warranty shall commence on the date of Substantial Completion and remain in

effect for two years. Prior to Final Completion the contractor shall schedule a 1 year and 2 year warranty walkthrough with the University.

114. Warranties shall commence at Substantial Completion unless otherwise specified by

manufacturer. These warranties are to remain in effect per the Construction Documents.

115. Provide 24‐hour response to critical building systems, i.e., loss of heating, cooling and control systems. At Substantial Completion, provide service agreements between service companies and the University as indicated. Service agreements shall include 24‐hour phone numbers and contact persons’ names the University may use in case of emergency. The

Emergency Service Agreement shall remain in effect for the two‐year warranty period. The General Contractor shall provide a contact person’s name and phone number for Contractor’s bonding company for use if the University experiences problems during the warranty.

 

 

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116. Noncritical warranty items will be corrected within five (5) working days; unless the Contractor notifies the University in writing that a delay will be experienced due to shipping of materials. A shipping date must be provided to advise the University of the Approximate Date of warranty repair. Warranty work shall commence as soon as reasonably possible and be diligently prosecuted to completion.

SECTION 01 78 39 – PROJECT RECORD DOCUMENTS 117. Record Drawings: One set(s) of marked-up record prints.

118. Record Product Data: One paper copy.

119. Miscellaneous Record Submittals: One paper copy.

SECTION 01 79 00 – DEMONSTRATION AND TRAINING

120. Program Structure: Training modules for each system and for equipment not part of a system, including the following:

a. Basis of system design, operational requirements, and criteria. b. Documentation. c. Emergencies. d. Operations. e. Adjustments. f. Troubleshooting. g. Maintenance. h. Repairs.

121. Facilitator shall prepare instruction program and training modules and to coordinate instructors.

122. Commercial videographer shall record demonstration and training video recordings. SECTION 01 81 13 – SUSTAINABLE DESIGN REQUIREMENTS (LEED FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION) 123. LEED-Certified certification based on LEED-NC.

124. LEED Documentation Submittals: Product data, receipts, certification letters, chain-of-custody

certificates, and other documentation needed to show compliance with requirements.

125. Project Materials Cost Data: For building materials used for Project, excluding mechanical, electrical, and plumbing components, and specialty items such as elevators, equipment and wood-based materials used for Project.

126. LEED Action Plans: Submit within 30 days of date established for the Notice to Proceed.

a. Credit MR 2: Waste management plan. b. Credit MR 3: Salvaged and refurbished materials. c. Credit MR 4: Materials with recycled content. d. Credit MR 5: Regional materials. e. Credit MR 7: Certified wood products. f. Credit IEQ 3.1: Construction indoor-air-quality management plan.

127. LEED Progress Reports: With each Application for Payment, comparing construction and

purchasing with LEED action plans.

128. LEED Coordinator: Engage an experienced LEED-Accredited Professional.

129. Contractor selects materials to comply with the following:

 

 

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1. Credit MR 3: Salvaged or refurbished materials for 5 percent of building materials (by cost).

2. Credit MR 4: Post-consumer recycled content plus one-half of pre-consumer recycled content constitutes a minimum of 10 percent of cost of materials.

3. Credit MR 5: 10 percent regional materials. 4. Credit MR 7: 50 percent of wood-based materials are FSC certified.

130. Credit IEQ 3.1: SMACNA’s “SMACNA IAQ Guideline for Occupied Buildings under Construction.”

131. Credit IEQ 3.2: Indoor air flush-out.

SECTION 01 91 13 – GENERAL COMMISSIONING REQUIREMENTS 132. Commissioning Team: Members representing contractor, including Project superintendent and

subcontractors, installers, suppliers, and specialists.

133. Commissioning Team: Members representing NAU, Commissioning Agent, facility users, operation and maintenance personnel, Architect and engineering design professionals.

134. Owner’s Responsibilities:

a. Provide Owner’s Project Requirements and Basis of Design documentation. b. Assign operation and maintenance personnel and schedule them for commissioning

activities.

135. Contractor’s Responsibilities: Assign personnel and schedule them for commissioning activities.

136. Commissioning Agent’s Responsibilities:

a. Organize and lead commissioning team. b. Provide commissioning plan. c. Convene commissioning team meetings. d. Provide Project-specific checklists and test procedures. e. Verify the execution of commissioning process activities using random sampling. f. Prepare and maintain Issues Log. g. Prepare and maintain completed construction checklist log. h. Witness systems, assemblies, equipment, and component startup. i. Compile test data, inspection reports, and certificates; include them in the systems

manual and commissioning process report.

137. Systems to be Commissioned: Provide functional performance testing for all modes of operation only for the applicable fire protection, plumbing, mechanical, electrical, fire alarm-life safety in Related Divisions that are included in the design. There is an “as applicable” caveat that is intended to exclude any generically listed pieces of equipment that are not included in the design.

a. Ventilation Systems:

1. HVAC Air Handling Systems 2. Variable Air Volume Units

b. Terminal Units (25% Statistical):

1. Variable Air Volume Boxes 2. Fancoils 3. Miscellaneous A/C Units, Heat Pumps, Heating Coils

c. Exhaust and Supply Systems:

1. General & Toilet

 

 

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d. Facility Control System (FCS):

1. Sequence of operation testing for all modes of operation for all seasons

including review of software. 2. Verification of graphics, point display, point command, alarming and

interoperability performance. 3. Testing of the FCS shall occur in a timely manner to meet the construction

schedule. If required, testing shall occur without the graphics to meet the construction schedule.

4. Trending

e. Plumbing Systems:

1. Domestic Hot Water Primary Equipment and associated controls 2. Pressure Booster Pump systems and associated controls

f. Electrical Systems:

1. Normal Power as it relates to the mechanical systems. 2. Lighting Control Systems (25% statistically sampled)

SECTION 02 41 13 – SELECTIVE SITE DEMOLITION

138. Protections: Provide temporary barricades and other forms of protection to protect workers and

general public from injury due to demolition work.

139. Damages: Promptly repair damages caused to adjacent facilities by demolition work.

140. Traffic: Conduct selective demolition operations and debris removal to ensure minimum interference with roads, streets, walks, and other adjacent occupied or used facilities.

141. Utility Services: Maintain existing utilities indicated to remain in service and protect them against damage during demolition operations. Do not interrupt utilities serving occupied or used facilities, except when authorized in writing by NAU. Provide temporary services during interruptions to existing utilities, as acceptable to governing authorities.

142. Environmental Controls: Provide temporary enclosures, and other methods to limit dust and dirt

migration.

143. Locate, identify, stub off, and remove utility services that are not indicated to remain. Do not abandon inactive utility lines in place.

144. Completely fill below-grade areas and voids resulting from demolition work. Provide fill consisting

of approved earth, gravel, or sand, free of trash and debris, stones over 6 inches in diameter, roots, or other organic matter. Compact in accordance with soils report.

145. Remove from building site debris, rubbish, and other materials resulting from demolition operations. Transport and legally dispose off-site.

SECTION 03 10 00 – CONCRETE FORMWORK 146. Design the formwork in accordance with ACI 301. 147. Provide forms for all concrete, except that authorized to be placed directly against earth in

trenches. Form sides of grade beams. Earth forms are permitted in the forming of appropriate subgrade elements. Sides of earth forms shall be hand trimmed and bottoms swept clean of all loose dirt prior to placement of concrete.

 

 

 

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148. Tolerances in accordance with ACI-117. 149. Construct of plywood or approved patented formwork systems with plywood or metal facings with

as large a face dimension as possible. 150. Install bucks, nailing blocks, inserts, anchors as required. Form all grooves, seats reglets, etc., as

required to receive the material and equipment indicated. 151. Forms shall be of suitable material and of type, size, shape, quality, and strength to enable

construction as designed.

152. The forms shall be true to line and grade, mortar tight, and sufficiently rigid to resist any appreciable amount of springing out of shape during placing of the concrete. The responsibility for their adequacy shall rest with the Contractor.

153. Dirt, chips, sawdust, nails, and other foreign matter shall be completely removed from forms

before any concrete is deposited. The surfaces of forms shall be smooth and free from irregularities, dents, sags and holes that would appreciably deface the finished surface. Forms previously used shall be thoroughly cleaned of all dirt, mortar and foreign matter before being reused, and the reuse of forms shall be subject to the approval of the Architect.

154. Before concrete is placed in forms, thoroughly treat inside surfaces of the forms with an approved releasing agent that will leave no objectionable film on the surface of the forms that can be absorbed by the concrete. Care shall be exercised that no releasing agent is deposited on previously placed concrete

SECTION 03 20 00 – CONCRETE REINFORCEMENT 155. Reinforcing Bars: ASTM A 615/A 615M, Grade 60 (Grade 420), deformed, except as follows: a. No. 2 bars: Grade 40. b. No. 7 bars and larger shall be welded. 156. Steel Reinforcement: Deliver, store, and handle steel reinforcement to prevent bending and

damage. 157. Welded wire fabric shall conform to ASTM A-185. Material shall have carbon content between

0.10% and 0.30% and be welded with low hydrogen rods only. 158. Fabricate and place steel reinforcing in accordance with requirements of Section 504 and ACI-

301 and ACI-318. 159. Lap splices a minimum of 48 bar diameters in masonry. 160. Comply with the requirements of AWS D1.4 for field welding.

161. Fiber Reinforcement: Synthetic Macro-Fiber: Polyolefin macro-fibers engineered and designed

for use in concrete, complying with ASTM C 1116/C 1116M, Type III, 1 to 2-1/4 inches (25 to 57 mm) long.

a. Euclid Chemical Company (The), an RPM company; Tuf-Strand SF. b. Grace Construction Products, W. R. Grace & Co.; Strux 90/40

SECTION 03 30 00 – CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE 162. Concrete work shall conform to ACI Standards 301(Specifications for Structural Concrete), 305

(Hot Weather Concreting), 306 (Cold Weather Concreting), 308 (Recommended Practices for Curing Concrete) & 318 (Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete). Non‐conforming work shall be removed and replaced at the contractor’s expense.

 

 

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163. Concrete shall conform to requirements of ACI-301 with Type II cement. Minimum 28 day

strength shall be 3000 psi, and as follows: a. Sidewalks, curbs, and gutters: 2,500 psi. b. Wall Foundations, Grade Beams, and Slabs on Grade: 4,000 psi. c. Heavy Use Slabs on Grade (thickness of 8” or greater): 4,000psi. 164. Standard for measuring, mixing, transporting and placing of concrete shall be ACI – 304.

Standard for measuring, mixing and delivery of ready mixed concrete shall be ASTM C-94; except that time in mixer after water has been added at batch plant is limited to 1-1/2 hours.

165. Tolerances in accordance with ACI-117. Tolerances for finished slab surfaces shall be class A

surface. Finish and measure surface so gap at any point between concrete surface and an unleveled, freestanding, 10-ft.- (3.05-m-) long straightedge resting on two high spots and placed anywhere on the surface does not exceed 1/8 inch.

166. Concrete tests will be made by an approved independent testing laboratory at the direction of the

Architect. Approximately one test will be made for each 50 cubic yards of each class of concrete when placed in large continuous pours. At least one test shall be made of pours less than 50 cu. yds. At the discretion of the Architect. Tests shall be made for 7 day and 28 day strength.

167. Finishes: All concrete surfaces not exposed to public view shall have rough form finish. All

exposed surfaces shall have smooth rubbed finishes. 168. Fly Ash: ASTM C618, Class F, shall not exceed 20 percent by weight of the combined weight of

the fly ash and cement. If fly ash is use as part of the mix design, maturity modeling of the mix during curing shall be required.

169. Expansion Joint Filler: ASTM D-1752, Type II preformed non-extruded, resilient type. 170. Vapor Retarder: Vapor barriers shall be a minimum 15-mil thick polyolefin (or equivalent), which

meets ASTM E 1745 Class A for below building slab-on-grade. 171. Concrete slabs scheduled to receive cementitious bonded finishes shall have a scratch finish but

true and even to plane with no sharp projections or ridges. 172. Exterior platforms, steps and landings and exterior or interior pedestrian ramps shall receive a

nonslip broom finish. 173. Place construction joints and control joints where required. Reinforcing shall be continuous

through construction joints and control joints. No concrete pour shall be longer than 100 feet or more than 900 square feet in area. Provide shear keys as detailed. At all exterior slab-on-grade provide a ½” wide control joint wherever slabs abut vertical construction elements, whether indicated or not.

174. When required to correct any unsatisfactory floor surface due to undue settlement, shrinkage or

cracking, leveling agent shall be used. 175. Coloring Agent: Schofield or Davis, colors as selected by Architect.

176. Cold Weather Placement: Concrete placement operations shall not be continued when a

descending air temperature falls below 40 degrees F; nor shall concrete placement operations be resumed until an ascending air temperature reaches 35 degrees F. Mixing and placing concrete shall continue no later in any day than that time which will allow sufficient time to place, finish and

protect the concrete already placed before the air temperature drops to 35 degrees F.

177. Heated Concrete mixes: Concrete operations may be allowed with specific Architect approval. Use equipment to heat the aggregates or water or both, prior to mixing. Aggregates shall be uniformly

 

 

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heated to at least 60 degrees F. and shall have no chunks of ice. Equipment used to heat the aggregates shall be such that uniform temperatures are obtained throughout the aggregate within each batch and from one batch to another. Water shall not be heated in excess of 150 degrees F. The contractor shall provide adequate insulation or heat or both, to protect the concrete after placement. This protection shall be to the extent required to maintain a temperature under the insulation of the concrete of from 60 to 90 degrees F. for a period of 72 hours after placement and from 40 to 90 degrees F. for an additional 96 hours.

 

DIVISION 04 – MASONRY SECTION 04 05 00 – COMMON WORK RESULTS FOR MASONRY 178. Mortar & grout shall be tested in accordance with procedures outlined by AMG-104. 179. Mortar shall conform to ASTM C-270, Type S. 180. Grout shall produce a minimum comprehensive strength of 2500 PSI at 28 days.

181. When air temperature is below 40 F., provide adequate equipment for heating the mortar and

grout materials. Temperatures of separate materials, including water, shall not exceed 140 F.,

when placed in the mixer. Mortar and grout shall have a temperature between 50 and 90 F., while being used.

182. Wet mortarboard before loading and cover mortar to retard drying when not being used. Use all

mortar and grout within one hour of initial mixing and use no mortar or grout after it has begun to set up or after it has become harsh or non-plastic.

183. Cement for mortar and grout shall be type II, low alkali Portland cement conforming to ASTM C-

150, with color admixture. All cement shall be from one manufacturer. 184. Mortar for concrete unit masonry shall be freshly prepared and uniformly and shall conform to

ASTM C-270, Type S. 185. Water shall be potable. 186. Mortar coloring material (two colors of mortar) shall consist of limeproof inorganic compounds in

the proportions recommended by the manufacturer, but in no case exceeding 15% of the weight of the cement.

SECTION 04 22 00 – CONCRETE UNIT MASONRY 187. Tolerances shall conform to ACI-531, except as otherwise noted. 188. It is the intent of this Specification to provide concrete unit masonry of Custom quality as defined

by the Arizona Masonry Guild (AMG). 189. Build all items required for a complete job, including reinforcing steel, bolts, anchors, nailing

blocks, door and window frames, pipes, conduits and vents. Provide temporary bracing for all masonry walls and leave in place until masonry is cured and the roof diaphragm is secured in place.

190. Concrete masonry units shall be manufactured to meet ASTM C-90, grade N-1 requirements for

hollow load bearing concrete masonry units, medium weight density.

a. Approximately 2/3 of CMU shall have medium finish with integral color and integral water repellent.

b. Approximately 1/3 of CMU shall be have burnished finish with integral color and integral water repellent.

 

 

 

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191. Horizontal wall masonry reinforcing shall be fabricated from zinc-coated cold drawn steel wire conforming to ASTM A-82 and shall consist of 2 deformed longitudinal side roads with cross rods butt-welded to side rods spaced at 16” intervals. Out to out spacing of side rods shall be approximately 2” less than the normal thickness of the wall or wythe. Use prefabricated or job fabricated corner and tee sections to form continuous reinforcement around corners and for anchoring abutting walls and partitions. Place 16” o.c. horizontally and 16” o.c., lap 6” at splices.

192. Control joint fill shall be factory extruded solid section of rubber conforming to ASTM D-2000,

M2AA-805, with a durometer hardness of approximately 80 when tested in conformance with ASTM D-2240. The shear action is to be 5/8” thickness.

193. Bond pattern is indicated. Where no bond pattern is indicated, lay up wall in a straight uniform

course with regular running bond. Unless otherwise specified or detailed, horizontal and vertical mortar joints shall be a normal 1/3” thick, and course vertically to 4” or 8”, horizontally to 16”. Joints shall be tooled concave.

194. Lay hollow CMUs as follows:

a. With face shells fully bedded in mortar and with head joints of depth equal to bed joints.

b. With webs fully bedded in mortar in all courses of piers, columns, and pilasters. c. With webs fully bedded in mortar in grouted masonry, including starting course

on footings. 195. Place vertical reinforcing and bond beam reinforcing per code requirements unless noted

otherwise. Lap splices in reinforcing 30 bar diameters unless otherwise noted. 196. Reinforcing steel is to be in place and inspected before grouting starts. Vertical cells to be filled

shall have vertical alignment to maintain a continuous cell area. Grout beams over opening and bond beams in a continuous operation. Solidly grout in place all bolts, anchors, etc.

197. Provide control joints, at all vertical masonry walls where such exceed 40 feet in length. Control

joint shall be continuous full height of walls. At bond beams control joint shall be separated both block & grout, however steel reinforcing shall be continuous.

198. Upon completion of the masonry work, clean all exposed masonry in an approved manner. 199. Cold Weather Masonry: When the ambient temperature is less than forty degrees F. masonry

work shall be constructed heat, heated materials, and protection Conform to the latest revision of Building Code Requirements for Masonry Structures (ACI 530. 1 /ASCE 6/ TMS 602). Standards for the preparation, installation and protection procedures in cold weather, include:

a. Specification for Masonry Structures (ACI 530.1/ASCE 6/TMS 602). b. Cold Weather Masonry Construction, PCA IS248. c. Hot and Cold Weather Masonry Construction, PCA LT232 (published by the Masonry

Industry Council).

200. Hot Weather Masonry: W hen the ambient temperature is greater than 100 degrees F (or 90 degrees F with 8 mph wind), masonry work shall be constructed with cooling for masonry, controlling moisture uptake from units, and providing moist curing as well as necessary mortar protection. Conform to the standards for hot weather construction i n Building Code Requirements for Masonry Structures (ACI 530/ASCE 5/TMS 402).

SECTION 04 30 00 – MASONRY INSULATING FILL 201. Insulating fill materials shall be silicone treated Perlite Loose Fill Insulation. Material shall conform

to ASTM C-549, Type IV.

 

 

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202. Plug all holes in the walls through which insulation can escape with permanent materials. Tightly caulk or otherwise permanently seal electrical outlets, and other apertures for conduits, pipe and all other wall openings prior to the installation of the insulation.

203. At exterior building unit masonry walls completely fill ungrouted cells solid with insulating fill

materials.

DIVISION 05 – METALS

SECTION 05 12 00 – STRUCTURAL STEEL FRAMING 204. Furnish, fabricate and erect the following items of structural metal, including but not limited to:

columns, beams and lintels. 205. Furnish, fabricate and deliver to the job the following items of structural metal, including but not

limited to: masonry bearing plates, anchor bolts and shelf angles. 206. Structural steel shall conform to ASTM A-36. 207. Steel pipe columns shall conform to ASTM A-501. 208. Steel tube columns shall conform to ASTM A-500, Grade B. 209. Machine bolts shall conform to ASTM A-307, unless otherwise indicated. 210. High strength bolts shall conform to ASTM A-325 or A-490. 211. Welding rods shall conform to AWS A5.0, E70 series, low hydrogen type. 212. Metal primer shall be Tnemec Series V10, low VOC or approved equal. Apply to wet thickness of

4.5 mils. 213. Conform to AISC Specifications for Design Fabrication and Erection of Structural Steel for

Buildings, AISC Code of Practice and applicable building codes. 214. Welders shall be duly qualified (test passed in the preceding 12 months) in the position in which

they are to weld and the qualifications and specifications for workmanship shall comply with AWS requirements for AAWS Specifications for Building.

215. Refer to General Structural Notes for additional information.

216. Recycled Content of Steel Products: Postconsumer recycle content plus one-half of preconsumer

recycled content not less than 50 percent.

SECTION 05 21 00 – STEEL JOIST FRAMING 217. K-series and KCS-type K-series steel joists for floor and roof framing, with top chord extensions.

218. K-series steel joist substitutes with steel-angle or -channel members for roof framing.

219. Primer: SSPC-Paint 15.

220. Bolts: High-strength carbon steel.

221. Finish: Plain, uncoated.

222. Connections: Field welded.

223. Testing of connections by Owner-engaged agency.

 

 

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224. Recycled Content of Steel Products: Postconsumer recycle content plus one-half of preconsumer

recycled content not less than 50 percent. SECTION 05 30 00 – METAL DECKING

225. Conform to minimum Specifications for the design of: Light Gage Cold Formed Steel Structural

Members as published by AISI. 226. Steel for Galvanized Deck (at building roof): ASTM A-446, Grade E. Galvanizing to be ASTM A-

525, Class. 227. Roof Deck: 1-1/2 inch deep, 20 gage, Type B. 228. Permanently fasten deck units to steel supporting members by welds at end laps between

adjacent deck units at intervals not exceeding 12″ O.C. by welding or button punching. 229. Provide additional metal reinforcement and closure pieces as required for strength, continuity of

decking and support of other work, unless otherwise shown. 230. Refer to General Structural Notes for additional information.

231. Recycled Content of Steel Products: Postconsumer recycle content plus one-half of preconsumer

recycled content not less than 50 percent. SECTION 05 36 00 – COMPOSITE METAL DECKING 232. Steel: ASTM A653, Structural Quality Grade 33, or ASTM A1008, Grade C, for shear stud weld-

through techniques.

a. Finish: galvanized. 233. Composite Floor Deck: 3 inch W3 X 20 gage, galvanized decking.

234. Where deck is to receive cementitious spray-applied fireproofing, furnish deck free of rolling

compounds, lubricants or other materials which will impair the proper adhesion of the fireproofing.

235. Galvanizing: ASTM A653 Class G-60.

236. Shear Studs: Provide shear connector studs as detailed and miscellaneous closures required to prepare the steel deck areas for concrete placement.

237. Shear connector studs shall conform to requirements of ASTM A108, Grades 1015-1020, yield 50,000 psi minimum, tensile 60,000 psi minimum, reduction of area 50 percent minimum.

238. Shear connector studs shall be of uniform diameter, heads shall be concentric and normal to shaft; the stud, after welding, shall be free from substance or defect which would interfere with its function as a shear connector.

239. Shear connector studs shall not be painted or galvanized. The size of studs shall be as shown on Drawings.

240. Galvanizing Repair Paint: High zinc-dust content paint complying with SSPC Paint 20 (94 percent minimum zinc dust content, dry film, by weight).

241. Shear connector studs shall be installed by welding to steel beams through previously installed metal deck.

 

 

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242. Weld studs through a single thickness of deck. Place decking so that a butt joint is obtained. Place studs directly over beam web, where one row of studs are required.

243. Recycled Content of Steel Products: Postconsumer recycle content plus one-half of preconsumer recycled content not less than 50 percent.

SECTION 05 41 00 – STRUCTURAL METAL STUD FRAMING 244. Steel for studs 16 gage and heavier shall conform to ASTM A-570, Grade 50. Steel for studs 18

gage and lighter shall conform to ASTM A-611, Grade C. Studs shall have a shop coat of rust resisting paint conforming to FS TT-P636.

245. Steel for galvanized studs shall conform to ASTM A-446, Grade D for studs 16 gage and heavier,

Grade A for studs 18 gage and lighter. Galvanizing to be class G60. 246. Attach similar components by welding. Welds shall be fillet, plug, butt or seam. Attach dissimilar

stud components by welding, screw attachments or bolting. Wire tying or splices in studs will not be permitted.

247. Seat studs squarely in the track with the stud web and flanges abutting the track web, plumb or

align, and securely attach to the flanges or web of both the upper and lower tracks by welding flanges to track; or by 4 sheet metal screws, bolts or rivets, 2 at top and 2 at bottom. Space studs on centers indicated but in no instance any further than 16″ o.c.

248. Provide 3/4″ steel channel bridging 36″ o.c. vertically, welded at each stud. Secure headers or

lintels by welding or by bolts or rivets as required. 249. Furnish and install 1/8″x3″ steel strap bracing as required. Bottom of steel bracing to be cut so as

to be flush with wall studs and to the exterior face of continuous bent plate angle along roof line.

250. Recycled Content of Steel Products: Postconsumer recycle content plus one-half of preconsumer recycled content not less than 50 percent.

SECTION 05 50 10 – METAL FABRICATIONS 251. The type of miscellaneous metal items include, but are not limited to the following:

a. Carpenter’s ironwork. b. Steel grating and fames. c. Steel pipe guards. d. Ladders. e. Loose bearing plates. f. Miscellaneous framing and supports. g. Miscellaneous steel trim. h. Steel fence and gates

252. Comply with the following codes, standards and Specifications:

a. AISC “Specifications for the Design, Fabrication and Erection of Structural Steel for

Buildings,” including “Commentary of the AISC Specifications.” b. AISC “Specifications for the Design of Cold-Formed Steel Structural Members.” c. AWS “Code for Welding in Building Construction.” d. ASTM A-6 “General Requirements for Delivery of Rolled Steel Plates, Shapes, Sheet

Piping and Bars for Structural Use.” 253. Use materials of required size and thickness to produce adequate strength and durability of the

finished product for the intended use.

 

 

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254. Grind welds smooth to match surface texture of parent metal. Fi l l gaps, holes and gouges with a permanent material (solder or brazing).

255. Adjoining railing splices shall be fully concealed. Miter elbow bends.

256. Tubing for railing: ASTM A 500. Do not exceed 6ft. between supports. 257. Shop paint miscellaneous metal work, except the members or portions of members to be

embedded in concrete or masonry and surfaces and edges to be field welded. Apply one shop coat of metal primer paint to fabricated metal items, except apply 2 coats of paint to surfaces, which are inaccessible after assembly or erection. Primer shall be Tnemec Series V10, low VOC or approved equal.

a. Exterior exposed metal fabrications shall have a spray applied epoxy-polymide type primer paint and spray applied finish paint-epoxy based and/or electrostatically applied.

258. Recycled Content of Steel Products: Postconsumer recycle content plus one-half of preconsumer

recycled content not less than 50 percent. SECTION 05 51 00 – METAL STAIRS 259. Design, fabricate and erect steel stairs to conform to NAAMM metal stairs manual. 260. Structural steel shapes and plates shall conform to ASTM A-36.

261. Primer: SSPC-Paint 15, Type I, red oxide; FS TT-P-636, red oxide; or manufacturer’s standard

shop primer complying with performance requirements of either of these red-oxide primers.

262. Construct entire assembly to support a minimum live load of 100 lbs per sq. ft.

263. Treads at Interior Locations: Form metal pans of 0.1046″ thick structural steel sheets (12 gauge) complying with ASTM A-570, Grade B.

264. Treads at Exterior Locations:

a. Basis-of-Design Product: Subject to compliance with requirements, provide “Close Riser Stair Tread” as manufactured by Century Group or comparable product by one of the following:

1. Camp Logan Cement 2. Century Group 3. Tile Tech Pavers 4. Wausau Tile

b. Configuration: One piece tread and riser. c. Platforms and landings: Precast concrete matching treads with miscellaneous

framing members as indicated. d. Concrete: Minimum 28-day compressive strength of 5000 psi.

e. Reinforcement: Grade 60 steel reinforcement.

265. Recycled Content of Steel Products: Postconsumer recycle content plus one-half of preconsumer recycled content not less than 50 percent.

SECTION 05 52 00 – METAL RAILINGS

266. Furnish and erect all steel railings and handrails including anchors, brackets, etc.

267. Structural steel shapes and pates shall conform to ASTM A-36.

 

 

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268. Steel tubing shall conform to ASTM A-500 Grade B. 269. Steel pipe: ASTM A-53, type as selected, Grade A, standard weight (Schedule 40).

270. Primer: SSPC-Paint 15, Type I, red oxide; FS TT-P-636, red oxide; or manufacturer’s standard

shop primer complying with performance requirements of either of these red-oxide primers. 271. Railings shall be smooth with all projections and corners ground smooth. Welds shall be flush

type, neatly and substantially done, with fillets dressed to uniform radius, with all excess metal removed and welds ground smooth. Return all rails ends to walls.

272. Install all posts and vertical members plumb within 1/8″ of vertical. Install all posts and vertical

members parallel with each other and with floor surfaces, or slope of stairs or ramp to within 1/8″ per 10 running feet. Spacing between members shall be so as to prohibit the passage of a 4″ sphere through railing. Center lines of all members within each run shall lie in the same vertical plane.

273. Recycled Content of Steel Products: Postconsumer recycle content plus one-half of preconsumer

recycled content not less than 50 percent. SECTION 05 73 13 – GLAZED DECORATIVE METAL RAILINGS 274. Decorative glass and stainless steel railings as manufactuered by Julius Blum & Company or

Architect approved equivalent. 275. Connections: Welded. 276. Changes in direction: By bending. 277. Railings supported by ½ inch thick tempered glass as structural balusters.

DIVISION 06 – WOOD, PLASTICS AND COMPOSITES SECTION 06 10 53 – MISCELLANEOUS ROUGH CARPENTRY 278. Lumber shall comply with the “American softwood Lumber Standard” PS 20 by the U.S.

Department of Commerce. All lumber to be S-Dry and S4S. 279. Plywood shall comply for each use, with the requirements of the U.S. Product Standard PS-1 for

“Softwood Plywood/Construction and Industrial”. 280. Provide wood for support or attachment of other work such as cant strips, bucks, mailers,

blocking, furring, grounds, and stripping and similar members. 281. Select proper type and size of anchor or fastener based upon material and finish for each

application.

282. Pressure treat the following items with water borne preservatives for aboveground use, complying with the AWPB LP-2:

a. Wood Cants, nailers, blocking, furring, stripping, and similar concealed members in

contact with masonry or concrete or below grade. 283. For all wood members required by code as fire retardant treated provide pressure impregnation

with fire retardant chemicals. All wood shall be identified with a UL label certifying this classification and the FM Diamond.

 

 

 

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284. Securely attach carpentry work substrates by anchoring and fastening as shown and as required by recognized standards.

SECTION 06 40 00 – ARCHITECTURAL WOODWORK

285. This Section includes:

a. Custom fabricated wood reception desks. b. Custom fabricated wood wall paneling. c. Wood veneer cabinetry

286. Fabricator Qualifications: Certified participant in AWI’s Quality Certification Program or Licensee

of WI’s Certified Compliance Program.

287. Mockups for typical architectural wood cabinets. 288. Grade: Premium.

289. Manufactured within 500 miles (800 km) of Project site.

290. FSC-certified wood.

291. Cabinet and Door and Drawer Front Interface Style: Flush overlay.

292. Wood for Exposed Surfaces:

a. Species: White maple. b. Cut: Plain sliced/plain sawn. c. Veneer Matching: Random match veneer leaves and balance match within panel

face.

293. Cabinet Interior: Compatible species stained to match exterior.

294. Composite Wood Products: Urea formaldehyde free.

295. Adhesives: Urea formaldehyde free.

296. Cabinet Hardware:

a. Hinges: Frameless, concealed. b. Pulls: Wire. c. Adjustable shelf supports. d. Locks: Door and drawer. e. Exposed Hardware Finishes: Satin stainless steel.

297. Architectural woodwork shall be shop finished. SECTION 06 41 16 – PLASTIC-LAMINATE-CLAD ARCHITECTURAL CABINETS 298. The “Quality Standards” of the AWI for Custom grade shall apply. 299. Casework with high-pressure laminate finish to be flush overlay design.

a. Horizontal Surfaces Other Than Tops: Grade HGL. b. Postformed Surfaces: Grade HGP. c. Vertical Surfaces: Grade VGS. d. Edges: Grade VGS.

 

 

 

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300. Countertops: Solid polymer adhesively joined with no exposed seams, having edge details as indicated. Provide complete with backsplash, 4″ minimum, unless indicated otherwise.

a. Solid Surfacing Material: Homogeneous solid sheets of filled plastic resin complying

with material and performance requirements of ANSI Z124.3, Type 5 or Type 6, without a precoated finish.

301. Furnish and install all items of casework hardware, including pulls, drawer guides, pivot hinges,

shelf standards and locks. 302. Hardware shall comply with ANSI A156.9, minimum quality level Type 2 (institutional). Hinges,

guides, slides, etc., shall utilize bearings complying with BHMA 201.

303. Cabinet hinges shall be self-closing. NAU standard Amerock spring loaded or approved equal. 304. Drawer slides shall allow full extension (1″ longer than total drawer depth), heavy duty (100 lb.

minimum), Blum or approved alternate. 305. Millwork designed to support electrical equipment (computers, phones, clocks, etc.) shall have

grommet openings for cords, interconnects cables, etc., concealed or routed internally. Grommets shall be 2-1/2″ minimum diameter plastic, color to match adjacent finish.

SECTION 06 42 16 – SCULPTED WOOD PANELING 306. Basis of Design: Drawings are based on the product and manufacturer specified. Information on

Drawings and in Specifications establishes requirements for product’s aesthetic effects and performance characteristics. Products by other manufacturers will be considered but are subject to Architect approval and compliance with requirements.

a. Product: Art Diffusion, MDF as manufactured by Interlam-Design, Inc. b. Thickness: 19 mm minimum. c. Pattern: Bio 8, horizontal orientation. d. Color: Natural.

DIVISION 07 – THERMAL AND MOISTURE PROTECTION

SECTION 07 11 13 – BITUMINOUS DAMPPROOFING

307. Two layers of trowel‐grade bituminous coating with interweaved mesh membrane reinforcement.

308. Termite‐resistant protection board embedded in bituminous coating to prohibit displacement

309. Apply damproofing at back-side of retaining walls.

310. Cold-Applied, Emulsified Asphalt: VOC of 30 g/L or less.

311. Primer: Emulsified asphalt.

312. Protection Course: Extruded-polystyrene board insulation.

313. Molded-Sheet Drainage Panels: Molded-plastic drainage core. SECTION 07 13 26 – SELF-ADHERING SHEET WATERPROOFING 314. This Section includes: Modified bituminous sheet waterproofing and molded-sheet drainage

panels.

 

 

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315. Modified Bituminous Sheet: Not less than 60-mil- (1.5-mm-) thick, self-adhering sheet consisting of 56 mils (1.4 mm) of rubberized asphalt laminated to a 4-mil- (0.10-mm-) thick, polyethylene film with release liner on adhesive side and formulated for application with primer or surface conditioner that complies with VOC limits of authorities having jurisdiction.

316. Basis of Design: Grace, W. R., & Co. – Conn.; Bituthene 3000/Low Temperature or Bituthene 4000.

317. Physical Properties:

a. Tensile Strength: 250 psi (1.7 MPa) minimum; ASTM D 412, Die C, modified. b. Ultimate Elongation: 300 percent minimum; ASTM D 412, Die C, modified. c. Low-Temperature Flexibility: Pass at minus 20 deg F (minus 29 deg C);

ASTM D 1970. d. Crack Cycling: Unaffected after 100 cycles of 1/8-inch (3-mm) movement;

ASTM C 836. e. Puncture Resistance: 40 lbf (180 N) minimum; ASTM E 154. f. Hydrostatic-Head Resistance: 150 feet (45 m) minimum; ASTM D 5385. g. Water Absorption: 0.15 percent weight-gain maximum after 48-hour immersion at 70

deg F (21 deg C); ASTM D 570. h. Vapor Permeance: 0.05 perms (2.9 ng/Pa x s x sq. m); ASTM E 96, Water Method.

318. Nonwoven-Geotextile-Faced, Molded-Sheet Drainage Panel: Manufactured composite

subsurface drainage panels consisting of a nonwoven, needle-punched geotextile facing with an apparent opening size not exceeding No. 70 (0.21-mm) sieve laminated to one side with or without a polymeric film bonded to the other side of a studded, nonbiodegradable, molded-plastic- sheet drainage core, with a vertical flow rate of 9 to 15 gpm per ft. (112 to 188 L/min. per m).

319. Two-Ply Application: Install sheets to form a membrane with lap widths not less than 50 percent of sheet widths to provide a minimum of 2 thicknesses of sheet membrane over areas to receive waterproofing.

320. Horizontal Application: Apply sheets from low point to high point of decks to ensure that side laps shed water.

321. Warranty:

a. 5 year warranty from the installer covering defects in installation. b. 10 year warranty from the materials manufacturer including defects in materials

and installation, and guaranteeing to maintain the system in a waterproof or dampproof condition (as applicable) for the life of the warranty.

c. Renewal option for an additional 10 years from the materials manufacturer. d. Full replacement value without proration.

SECTION 07 19 00 – WATER REPELLENTS 322. This Section includes penetrating water-repellent coatings for the following vertical and horizontal

surfaces:

a. Concrete (unpainted). b. Concrete unit masonry (unpainted and unglazed).

323. Silane/Siloxane-Blend, Penetrating Water Repellent: Clear, silane and siloxane blends with 3.3

lb/gal. (400 g/L) or less of VOCs. Available Products:

a. Chemprobe Coating Systems, L. P.; Deck A Pell 15%. b. L&M Construction Chemicals, Inc.;Hydroblock. c. ProSoCo, Inc.; Weatherseal GP. d. Sonneborn Building Products, a division of ChemRex; White Roc 10 WB.

 

 

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e. Tamms Industries, Inc.; Chemstop WB Heavy Duty. SECTION 07 21 00 – THERMAL INSULATION 324. Insulation materials shall be flexible fiberglass batts or blankets, Foil-Faced, Glass-Fiber Blanket

Insulation: ASTM C 665, Type III (reflective faced), Class B (faced surface with a flame- propagation resistance of 0.12 W/sq. cm); Category 1 (membrane is a vapor barrier), faced with foil scrim, foil-scrim kraft, or foil-scrim polyethylene having a minimum rating of R-19 (walls) as determined by NMWIA.

325. Mechanical anchors shall be welded pins with washers. Provide one clip for each square foot of

batt insulation installation. 326. Cut and fit insulation materials around pipes, conduits, outlet boxes, etc., as necessary to

maintain the integrity of the insulation. Where pipes are installed in spaces to receive insulation, place insulation between exterior wall and the pipe, compressing insulation as necessary.

327. Apply pins to surfaces to receive insulation by welding. Impale insulation over clips, install washer

over pin. 328. At wall and ceiling areas install insulation between framing members with flanges continuously

tight against framing members and ends tightly butted. SECTION 07 22 16 – ROOF BOARD INSULATION 329. Polyisocyanurate Foam Core Insulation Board: Membrane manufacturer’s recommended

compatible polyisocyanurate manufacturers. 330. Polystyrene Insulation (Crickets): ASTM C-758, Type II.

a. Provide metal or 2×4 wood framing and sub‐framing for large crickets. Cricket surfaces must be able to accept live loads similar to those of the basic roof deck.

331. Cant Strips: Rigid preformed fiberboard, sizes as shown, ASTM C-208. 332. Metal Deck: Lay roof insulation with edges parallel to plates and bearing on deck surface. Secure

insulation units by installation of one insulation clip for each 2 square feet insulation per manufacturers instructions as required for FMI rating.

333. At roof drains, taper insulation from flush with drain rings to full thickness back 18” away from

drains on all sides. 334. Center roof tape over all insulation joints and edge embed in hot steep asphalt, using 15-20lbs.

Per 100 square feet of tape. Lap tape ends 4”. 335. At all vertical intersections install 4”x4” rigid fiberboard cant strips over the insulation. Miter all

corners, and taper evenly back from scuppers.

SECTION 07 27 00 – AIR BARRIERS 336. Air barrier materials used in frame walls should have an air permeability not to exceed cfm/ft2

under a pressure differential of 0.3 in. water (1.57 lb/ft2) when tested in accordance with ASTM E 2178.

 

337. Penetrations of the air barrier system and paths of air infiltration/ex‐filtration shall be airtight. 338. Flexible Flashing: Butyl rubber or rubberized asphalt.

 

 

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SECTION 07 42 13 – METAL WALL PANELS 339. Work includes factory-formed and field-assembled metal wall panels:

340. Flush profile, concealed-fastener, lap-seam metal wall and soffit panels.

341. Metal Wall Panel Assembly: Metal wall panels, attachment system components, miscellaneous

metal framing, thermal insulation, and accessories necessary for a complete weathertight system.

342. Concealed-Fastener, Lap-Seam Metal Panels: Provide factory-formed metal wall panels designed to be field assembled by lapping and interconnecting side edges of adjacent panels and mechanically attaching through panel to supports using concealed fasteners and factory-applied sealant in side laps. Include accessories required for weathertight installation.

343. Flush-Profile, Concealed-Fastener Metal Wall Panels: Formed with vertical panel edges and in- termediate stiffening ribs symmetrically spaced between panel edges; with flush joint between panels.

344. Basis-of-Design Product: The design is based on the product named. Subject to compliance with requirements, provide either the named product or a comparable product by one of the other specified manufacturers. Comparable products are subject to review and approval through the submittal process.

a. Centria IW-10A

345. Available Manufacturers: Subject to compliance with requirements, manufacturers offering products that may be incorporated into the Work include, but are not limited to, the following:

a. Alcoa Cladding Systems. b. Berridge Manufacturing Company. c. CENTRIA Architectural Systems. d. Fabral, Inc. e. MBCI; Div. of NCI Building Systems. f. Morin Corporation; a Metecno Group Company.

346. Material: Aluminum-Zinc Alloy-Coated Steel Sheet, 0.0269 inch (0.70 mm) thick, minimum.

a. Panel Coverage: 12 inches (305 mm). b. Panel Height: 1.5 inches (38 mm).

SECTION 07 54 16 – ETHYLENE INTERPOLYMER (KEE) ROOFING 347. KEE Sheet: ASTM D 6754/D 6754M, fabric reinforced.

348. Roofing System Design: Uplift pressures calculated according to ASCE/SEI 7. 349. FM Approvals Listing: FM Global Listing: Roofing, base flashings, and component materials shall

comply with requirements in FM Global 4450 and shall be listed in FM Global’s “RoofNav” for Class 1 or noncombustible construction, as applicable. Class 1A-90.

350. Exterior Fire-Test Exposure: Class A. 351. Manufacturer’s Materials and Workmanship Warranty: 15 years. 352. Roofing Membrane Sheet: 50 mil. 353. Walkways: Reinforced pads. 354. Adhering Method: Mechanically fastened.

 

 

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355. Color: White. SECTION 07 61 13 – STANDING SEAM SHEET METAL ROOFING 356. Provide metal roof panel system with:

a. UL Class A fire rating. b. UL Class 120 wind uplift rating. c. Minimum 15‐lb asphalt saturated underlayment. d. Steel factory formed panels. e. Concealed fastener installation

357. Sheet metal shall be 22 gauge galvanized sheet metal conforming to ASTM A-525. Finish to be

factory applied fluoropolymer coating.

358. Building paper shall be of smooth unsaturated quality, rozin sized and weighing not less than 15 pounds per 100 square feet.

359. Plastic cement shall conform to FS SS-C-153, Type I.

360. Standing seams shall finish not less than 1-1/2″ high.

361. Fasten all pieces using cleats. 362. Panels shall be 16 inches wide. SECTION 07 62 00 – SHEET METAL FLASHING AND TRIM 363. Provide the flashing and sheet metal work as required. 364. Quality, procedures and methods shall be recommended by SMACNA Architectural Sheet Metal

Manual. 365. Galvanized Sheet Metal: ASTM A-525, 24 gage minimum. 366. Plastic Cement: AFS SS-C-153, Type I. 367. Sealant: Rubber base sealant. 368. Provide for thermal expansion of running trim, flashing and other items exposed for more than 15

feet continuous length. Maintain a watertight installation at expansion seams. 369. Schedule: Provide the following sheet metal items:

a. Reglets and Counterflashings b. Metal Roof Edgings c. Scuppers d. Gutters e. Downspouts f. Metal Copings

SECTION 07 81 00 – APPLIED FIREPROOFING 370. Sprayed fireproofing shall have been tested by UL, or other certified testing agency, according

with the procedures of ASTM E-119. 371. The sprayed fireproofing material shall be sprayed onto structural members, the underside of

decks after concrete topping and/or roofing applications have been completed, and to other

 

 

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members indicated, with proper thickness and density to provide the following fire resistive ratings:

A. Columns 1 Hour B. Primary Members 1 Hour C. Secondary Members 1 Hour D. Sprayed fireproofing beneath

the floor assembly together with the assembly above 1 Hour

372. The sprayed fireproofing material shall be cementitious type formulated without asbestos. 373. Application of sprayed fireproofing shall be in accordance with the printed instructions of the

material manufacturer and shall be installed by experienced craftsmen. 374. Upon request, a qualified manufacturer’s representative shall be present for initial application to

guide and assist applicators personnel. 375. The Architect may select, and the Owner will pay an independent testing laboratory to sample

and verify the thickness and density of the fireproofing in accordance with provisions of ASTM E- 605.

SECTION 07 84 13 – PENETRATION FIRESTOPPING

376. Work includes through-penetration fire-stopping systems for penetrations through the following fire-resistance-rated assemblies, including both empty openings and openings containing penetrating items:

a. Floors. b. Walls and partitions

377. Available Manufacturers: Manufacture’s products will be considered subject to compliance with

requirements of the fire-rated assemblies indicated. Manufacturers offering products that may be incorporated into the Work include, but are not limited to, the following:

a. A/D Fire Protection Systems Inc. b. DAP Inc. c. Firestop Systems Inc. d. Hilti Construction Chemicals, Inc. e. Instant Firestop Mfg. Inc. f. International Protective Coatings Corp. g. Isolatek International. h. 3M Fire Protection Products. i. Tremco. j. United States Gypsum Company.

378. Compatibility: Provide through-penetration firestop systems that are compatible with one another,

with the substrates forming openings, and with the items, if any, penetrating through-penetration firestop systems, under conditions of service and application, as demonstrated by through- penetration firestop system manufacturer based on testing and field experience.

379. Accessories: Provide components for each through-penetration firestop system that are needed to install fill materials and to comply with fire-rating requirements. Use only components specified by through-penetration firestop system manufacturer and approved by the qualified testing and inspecting agency for firestop systems indicated.

 

 

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380. Install fill materials for firestop systems by proven techniques to produce the following results:

a. Fill voids and cavities formed by openings, forming materials, accessories, and penetrating items as required to achieve fire-resistance ratings indicated.

b. Apply materials so they contact and adhere to substrates formed by openings and penetrating items.

c. For fill materials that will remain exposed after completing Work, finish to produce smooth, uniform surfaces that are flush with adjoining finishes.

SECTION 07 92 00 – JOINT SEALANTS

381. Silicone Sealant: FS TT-S-001543, Type II, Class A. 382. Acrylic Latex Sealant: ASTM C-834. Sealant shall be paintable. 383. Polyurethane Sealant: Sealants used on exterior of project, including inside surface of exterior

joints, shall be multi-component polyurethane base, ASTM C 920. Type M, Grad NS, Class 25. 384. Fire-Stopping Sealant: UL approved, conforming to ASTM E 814 and formulated for use in a

through-penetration fire-stop system for sealing openings around cables, conduit, pipes and similar penetrations through walls.

385. Primer: Where required, shall be used as recommended, in writing by the manufacturer. The

primer shall have been tested for non-staining characteristics and durability on samples of actual surfaces to be sealed.

386. Back-up materials and preformed joint fillers shall be non-staining, compatible with sealant and

primer, and of a resilient nature, such as closed cell polyethylene rod, closed cell urethane or Neoprene rod, or elastomeric tubing or rod (Neoprene, butyl, or EPDM). Materials impregnated with oil bitumen or similar materials shall not be used. Size and shape shall be indicated by joint details on drawings and shall be as recommended by sealant manufacturer in writing. Sealant shall not adhere to back-up material.

387. Follow sealant manufacturer’s instructions regarding mixing (if required), surface preparation,

priming, application life, and application procedure. 388. Provide caulking at the following locations. This schedule is not to be construed to be complete.

Provide sealant at other areas as indicated.

a. Perimeter of interior door frames: Acrylic Latex Sealant. b. Perimeter of exterior door frames: Polyurethane Sealant. c. Perimeter of window frames, interior and exterior: Polyurethane Sealant. d. Perimeter of louvers and grilles, interior and exterior: Polyurethane Sealant. e. Perimeter of exterior aluminum sections: Polyurethane Sealant. f. Perimeter of Plumbing fixtures: Silicone Sealant. g. Counter tops at walls or partitions: Acrylic Latex Sealant. h. At joints created by penetrations in rated wall or floor assembly and fire resistant joints:

Fire-stopping Sealant.

389. Provide non-sag sealant complying with requirements of federal specifications TTS-1543 or FS TT-S-280 Type “II”, Class “A.” Provide acoustical sealant which shall be non-hardening, non- drying synthetic rubber sealing compound with minimum 90% solids. Use at all interior joints at inner sections between planes. Around door and window frames primer shall be made or recommended by sealant manufacturer for the specific conditions and substrates.

390. Surfaces shall be adequately cleaned and prepared in accordance with manufacturer’s written

instructions prior to installation.

 

 

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SECTION 07 95 00 – EXPANSION CONTROL 391. Floor-to-Floor and Floor-to-Wall:

a. Type: Dual elastomeric seal. b. Fire-Resistance Rating: As indicated.

392. Wall-to-Wall Joint Systems:

a. Type: Dual elastomeric seal. b. Fire-Resistance Rating: As indicated.

393. Slab-to-Slab and Slab-to-Wall:

a. Type: Compression seal. b. Fire-Resistance Rating: As indicated.

394. Moisture Barrier: Manufacturer’s standard

 

DIVISION 08 – OPENINGS SECTION 08 12 13 – HOLLOW METAL FRAMES 395. Frames to meet specified requirements of SDI or NAAMM for unit welded frames. 396. Frames to be pressed steel to profile indicated, 16 gage cold rolled, pickled annealed steel, with

angles, molds, returns and miters fully welded and weld beads ground smooth. Frames shall have wall anchors a maximum of 16″ o.c. per jamb. Exterior door frames shall be 14 gauge and galvanized.

397. Prepare frames to receive mortised type hardware. 398. Provide frames with UL labels as required or indicated. 399. Provide window frames with loose glazing beads with screws for flush countersunk installation to

receive glass per SDI-100. 400. Install metal frames at location indicated, set square and plumb with building lines, anchoring

securely to construction. SECTION 08 13 13 – HOLLOW METAL DOORS 401. Doors shall be specified as commercial heavy duty quality. Minimum door thickness shall be 1-

3/4″ thick. Interior doors shall comply with SD1-100, Grade II, heavy duty, minimum 16 gauge faces. Exterior doors shall comply with SD1-100 Grade III extra heavy duty, minimum 16 gauge faces.

402. Doors to meet specified requirements of SDI and/or NAAMM. 403. Construct hollow metal doors, flush type, 1-3/4″ thick, of 2 sheets of finest grade 16 gage cold

rolled steel. 404. Provide for glazing in doors as scheduled. Non-removable minimum 20 gage glazing stops shall

occur on the outside of the exterior doors and on the reverse side of interior doors. Glazing beads on the inside of glass panels shall be removable.

405. Provide doors with UL labels as required or indicated.

 

 

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406. Doors to be thoroughly cleaned, bonderized and primed with shop coat of light gray zinc chromate rust inhibitive primer, baked on.

407. Install doors completely and accurately, complete with finish hardware. Install finish hardware in

a neat workmanlike manner in accordance with hardware schedule using only mechanics skilled in this type of work. Do not install hardware until painting is completed. Keep all hardware free from scratches, dents or other defacements.

408. Provide doors of sizes and types indicated on drawings, fully welded seamless construction with

no visible seams or joints on faces or vertical edges; thicknesses as scheduled on drawings. 409. Face stiffeners, edges and hardware reinforcement shall be the highest quality workmanship and

materials. Provide in accordance with best trade practice and manufacturer’s written recommendations for the use intended.

410. Provide custom made welded units with integral trim; sizes and shapes as indicated on drawings;

fabricate units square, true and free from defects. 411. Hardware reinforcement and anchors (erection, floor and jamb) shall be as required for a secure

installation and shall be in accordance with trade requirements for the specified hardware and intended use.

412. Prepare doors for finish hardware. Obtain templates from hardware manufacturer and confirm

type, location, and special requirements of hardware for each door prior to cutting. SECTION 08 14 16 – FLUSH WOOD DOORS 413. Interior doors shall be solid core wood doors with hardwood veneer finish: White Maple. 414. Provide wood doors and related items in accordance with AWI “Quality Standards”, Section 1300. 415. Furnish manufacturer’s standard “Life of the Installation” guarantee for all interior doors. 416. Solid Core Wood Doors: Flush, 1-3/4 inch thick, plain sliced, balance matched, white maple,

custom grade, for a transparent finish. Core to be Type PC-5 or 7, particle board. 417. Labeled Wood Doors: Flush AWI custom grade, mineral core, faces and finished to match interior

doors with the UL label as listed. Edges shall be fire treated maple and shall be compatibly finished to match door faces. Schedule hardware in accordance with manufacturer’s comparative date or Underwriters’ Laboratories, Inc. listings. Pre-fit doors to 1/8″ under net opening width and 7/16 under net height.

SECTION 08 31 13 – ACCESS DOORS AND FRAMES 418. Access doors shall be stainless steel construction and will be located for convenient access to

plumbing chases. 419. Flush Access Doors and Trimless Frames: Fabricated from stainless steel sheet. 420. Locations: Wall surfaces. 421. Door: Minimum 0.060-inch thick sheet metal, set flush with surrounding finish surfaces. 422. Frame: Minimum 0.060-inch thick sheet metal with drywall bead flange. 423. Hinges: Spring-loaded, concealed-pin type. 424. Lock: Cylinder, keyed.

 

 

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SECTION 08 33 26 – OVERHEAD COILING GRILLES 425. Coiling grilles shall be pattern G-5014 as manufactured by the Cookson Co. Products equaling or

exceeding specification requirements as manufactured by Mahon, Pacific, Cornell, Overhead Door, North American or Crawford are acceptable.

426. Grille curtain shall be aluminum 5/16″ horizontal rods and 5/8″ hinged vertical connecting links on 9″ centers. The bottom bar shall be tubular in shape, 1-1/2″ wide and 4″ high.

427. Operation shall be motor operator. 428. Locking to be by means of cylinder of locking device operable both sides. 429. Finish for aluminum surfaces shall be mill finish. Steel surfaces are to be painted one shop coat

of rust inhibiting primer and factory painted. SECTION 08 41 13 – ALUMINUM-FRAMED ENTRANCES AND STOREFRONT 430. Standards: Except as otherwise indicated, the requirements for aluminum doors and frames, and

the terminology used in this Section, are those of NAAMM, AAMA and AA and in particular, those of the “Entrance Manual” by NAAMM.

431. Manufacturer: Specifications are based on products as manufactured by EFCO Series 433,

Thermal Multiplane system, 2″ X 4-1/2″ for 1″ insulated glass. 432. Framing members, transition members, mullions, adapters and mountings shall be extruded of

aluminum alloy and temper consistent of with the method manufacture. The members shall be of 6063 T5 extruded aluminum alloy.

433. Clear Anodic Finish: AAMA 611, AA-M12C22A41, Class I, 0.018 mm anodized finish. 434. Comply with manufacturer’s specifications and recommendations for installation of aluminum

storefront. 435. Set units plumb, level and true in line without warp or rack of frames, doors or panels. Anchor

securely in place. Separate aluminum and other corrodible metal surfaces from sources of corrosion or electrolytic action at points of contact with other materials.

SECTION 08 42 29 – AUTOMATIC ENTRANCES 436. Comply with BHMA A156.10, “Power Operated Pedestrian Door Standard.” 437. Sliding Door Operators: Electromechanical. 438. Operator Controls: Microwave-scanner motion-detecting control system. 439. Guide Rails: Aluminum bar-stock guard rails, with Class I, color anodic finish; AA-

M12C22A42/A44. 440. Install power door operators and controls. After use, readjust door operators and controls and

lubricate hardware and moving parts. Securely anchor guide rails level and true to location. SECTION 08 51 13 – ALUMINUM WINDOWS 441. Provide casement type operable aluminum window. 442. Aluminum windows shall conform to the requirements of NAAMM, AAMA and AA for Architectural

Grade rating.

 

 

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443. Aluminum extrusions shall be 6063T-5 alloy with a minimum wall thickness of .062″. Corners of all frames shall be welded, mitered joints.

444. Comply with manufacturer’s specifications and recommendations for the installation of aluminum

windows and screens. Set units plumb, level and true in line, without warp or rack of frames. Anchor securely in place. Separate aluminum and other corrodible metal surfaces from sources of corrosion or other electrolytic action at points of contact with other compound as shown, or with joint fillers or gaskets as shown to provide weathertight construction.

SECTION 08 63 00 – METAL FRAMED SKYLIGHTS 445. Size and configuration: As indicated. 446. Glazing: Glass (Wire glass or laminated) in accordance with local codes. 447. Aluminum Finish: Class I, clear anodic.

SECTION 08 71 00 – DOOR HARDWARE 448. Provide cylindrical locksets with lever handles. Best (Stanley) 9K series with 93K being the

predominent model, brushed chrome, 26D or 626,with finish and full escutcheon plates. Lever/rose designs shall be 15D or style to match NAU locksets and shall comply with appropriate codes.

449. Cylindrical locks, Best 9K series are preferred for new construction and may be used in renovation projects Rose design and finish should match the building’s existing hardware.

450. Northern Arizona University uses the Lenel electronic access control system/security system.

Building access control and security systems, including cameras and video recorders, shall be compatible with and integrated fully into that Lenel system. Electrified hardware will be from the same manufacturer, with the same style and finish as the non-electrified hardware in the building.

451. Exit devices shall be rim type, installed with a mullion in double doors. Vertical rod systems will not

be used unless necessary to make an existing doorway meet handicap code requirements for width. Finish shall match other building door hardware.

 

a. Approved Model: Precision Hardware Inc., APEX Series model 2100 is preferred with 1700A or 1700C to match other trim in the building.

452. Door closers will have extra heavy duty arms and be mounted with thru bolts.

a. Closers will be mounted and set for 180º opening. b. LCN 4041, EDA, TB/MS. The closer finish is to match other hardware in the building.

453. Hold open devices on self closing doors will release the doors automatically upon the detection of

smoke or heat, max 165 deg F. 454. Match the University Best keying system. The FS Building Access Services department will

specify which system and the keyway to be used. Only original Best cylinders and interchangeable cores shall be used. Pinning and key cutting will be done by the FS Building Access Services department. Key blanks and cylinders/cores will be provided by and paid for by the Contractor and should be shipped directly to the FS Building Access Services department.

455. Doors shall be mounted with three 4-1/2” x 4-1/2” full mortise hinges. Doors larger than 3’x7′

shall be mounted with four hinges.

456. Locksets shall accommodate the “Best” core. Contractor shall provide construction cores. The permanent cores are to be pre-paid by the Contractor and shipped directly to NAU Facility Services

 

 

 

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457. Furnish finish hardware including necessary screws, bolts, or other fastenings of suitable size and type to anchor the hardware in position for heavy use.

458. Exterior outswinging doors shall have butts with non-removable pin when the door is closed.

Doors with closers shall have ball bearing butts. 459. The Contractor shall be responsible for proper operation and fitting of hardware in locations

specified. The Contractor must supply a room under lock and key to store all finish hardware until installation is made. The hardware supplier must mark each item of hardware as to description and location of installation in accordance with approved hardware schedule. Exposed surfaces of hardware shall be covered and well protected during installation, so as to avoid damage to finishes.

460. Provide hardware for fire-rated openings in compliance with requirements of NFPA 80. This

requirement takes precedence over other requirements for such hardware. 461. Install each hardware item in accordance with the manufacturer’s written instructions and

recommendations. Set items level, plumb and true to line and location. Adjust and reinforce the attachment substrate as necessary for a secure installation. Space fasteners and anchors as indicated or in accordance with industry standards.

462. Lubricate all moving parts with graphite-type lubricant, unless otherwise recommended by

manufacturer. Replace all hardware which cannot be lubricated and adjust to operate freely and smoothly.

SECTION 08 80 00 – GLAZING 463. Glass and glazing shall conform to “Safety Standards Architectural Glazing Material,” 16 CFR

1201 and to local code requirements. In case of conflict the more stringent requirements shall apply.

464. Watertight and airtight installation of each piece of glass is required. Each installation must

withstand normal temperature changes, wind loading, and impact loading without failure of any kind including loss or breakage of glass.

465. Monolithic Glass: 1/4″ clear fully tempered float glass where full tempering is required to resist

thermal stresses induced by differential shading of individual glass lites and to comply with structural performance requirements.

466. Low Emissivity-Coated Insulating Glass Units: 1 inch, green in color: Manufacturer’s standard

units with one pane of glass coated with neutral colored, low-emissivity metallic coating, of type and on surface recommend by manufacturer for use indicated, and complying with the following requirements:

a. Exterior Pane: Tinted float glass coated on second surface. Kind HS (heat

strengthened), tempered where required by code. b. Interior Pane: Clear float glass, uncoated. c. Kind HS (heat strengthened), tempered where required by code. d. Color: Green

467. Acoustical Glass: Laminated Glass, ASTM C 1172, and complying with testing requirements in

16 CFR 1201 for Category II materials, and with other requirements specified. Use materials that have a proven record of no tendency to bubble, discolor, or lose physical and mechanical properties after fabrication and installation.

a. Construction: Laminate glass with polyvinyl butyral interlayer to comply with interlayer manufacturer’s written recommendations.

b. Interlayer Thickness: 0.030 inch. c. Interlayer Color: Clear unless otherwise indicated.

 

 

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d. First glass ply: 3/8 inch, clear float or fully tempered glass as required to comply with 16 CFR 1201.

e. Second glass ply: ¼ inch, clear float or fully tempered glass as required to comply with 16 CFR 1201.

f. Provide safety glazing labeling. g. STC: 40.

468. Installation to comply with ”Glazing Manual” by GANA (Glazing Association of North America),

except as shown and specified otherwise by the manufacturer of the glass and glazing materials. 469. Warranty Period: 10 years from date of Final Acceptance.

a. Provide heat-strengthened panes. Performance characteristics designated for coated insulating glass are nominal values based on manufacturer’s published test data for units with 1/4″ thick panes of glass and 1/2″ thick air space.

b. Performance Classification per ASTM E 774: Class A.

SECTION 08 83 00 – MIRRORS 470. Safety Glass: Category II materials per 16 CFR 1201.

471. Glass Mirrors: ASTM C 1503; manufactured using copper-free, low-lead mirror coating process.

472. Clear Glass: Nominal thickness of 4.0 mm. Ultraclear (low-iron) float glass with a minimum 91

percent visible light transmission.

473. Film backing for safety mirrors.

474. Mirror Hardware: Bottom aluminum J-channels and top aluminum J-channels.

475. Mirror Edges: Flat polished. SECTION 08 87 33 – DECORATIVE FILMS 476. Decorative Film (Translucent): Glass with translucent decorative film overlay. Use translucent,

dimensionally stable, cast PVC film, 2-mil- (0.05-mm-) minimum thickness, with pressure- sensitive, clear adhesive back for adhering to glass and releasable protective backing.

477. Products: Subject to compliance with requirements, available products that may be incorporated

into the Work include, but are not limited to, the following:

a. Avery Dennison, Graphics; Etchmark A5861-S. b. FDC Graphic Films, Inc.; Intermediate Frosted Crystal Vinyl Film Series 3804, Silver. c. FDC Graphic Films, Inc.; Premium Frosted Etched Glass Vinyl Film Series 3500. d. 3M; Scotchcal Dusted Crystal. e. 3M; Scotchcal Frosted Crystal, Clear. f.

478. Comply with requirements for safety glazing. 479. Use: Suitable for exterior and interior applications. 480. Patterns: As selected by Architect from manufacturer’s full range.

SECTION 08 91 19 – FIXED LOUVERS

481. Fixed, Extruded-Aluminum Louvers: Horizontal, Sightproof, Drainable-Blade Louver: 5 inches (125 mm) deep.

a. Mullion Type: Fully recessed.

 

 

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b. Louver Screens: Provided at each exterior louver. c. Screening Type: Bird screening.

482. Blank-Off Panels: Insulated.

483. Aluminum Finish: Class I, color anodic.

DIVISION 09 – FINISHES

SECTION 09 21 16 – GYPSUM BOARD ASSEMBLIES 484. Gypsum Board (Typical): 5/8″ thick, regular, tapered edge. Provide Type “X” fire retardant

gypsum wall board panels 5/8″ thick, tested and qualified for 1-hour rating, tapered and rounded at edges as indicated on drawings.

485. 5/8” fire rated water resistant gypsum panels at wet walls. Provide cement board panels at showers and tubs.

486. Provide gypsum wall panels manufactured in accordance with requirements of ASTM 336. 487. Gypsum Board at Restrooms: 5/8″ thick, water resistant. Use cementitious backer board for tile at

walls at showers and where indicated. 488. Metal Studs: 3-5/8″, 25 gage, galvanized metal, ‘C’ shaped studs at 16″ o.c. minimum. Provide

channel-shaped roll formed sheet steel members conforming to ASTM C640, hot dipped finish where exposed to moisture not less than 25 gage. Provide 20 gage (structural) at door jambs.

489. Provide blocking and framing for wall mounted finish hardware and equipment, including door

stops. 490. Provide channel shaped blocking support or galvanized strip support of wall-hung cabinets,

equipment, fixtures and accessories of not less than 22 ga. material. Provide support in wall or partition framing system wherever wall hung cabinets and equipment are indicated on drawings and where required for mounting of miscellaneous items requiring backing.

491. Provide kick bracing in accordance with industry standards for wall studs, ceiling members, draft

or smoke stops and curtain walls. 492. Provide metal edge and corner beads at ends, edges, and corners. 493. Fire Rated Assemblies: Type X, 5/8″ thick, double layer where indicated. 494. Wall Texture: Smooth, without divots, bumps, bows or any other surface blemish, ready to

receive paint. Apply Level 4 finish at walls to receive flat, velvet or eggshell gloss paint. Apply Level 5 finish at walls to receive semi-gloss paint.

SECTION 09 21 23 – GYPSUM SHAFT WALL ASSEMBLIES 495. Shaft shall be used at mechanical shafts.

496. Comply with ASTM C-840 and C-754, and GA-216, insofar as any portions are applicable, are

hereby made a direct part of this Specification as though repeated herein. In case of conflicts the more stringent requirements shall govern.

497. Materials not specified herein but required for installation of shaft walls shall be as specified under Section 09 21 16 – Gypsum Board Assemblies.

498. Shaft Wall System Components:

 

 

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a. Linerboard: 1″ Gypsum shaft wall liner, beveled edge, 24″ wide. b. Steel CH Studs: 212 CH 8 and 400 CH10 hot dipped galvanized. c. Steel E Studs: 212 ES 10 and 400 ES 10 hot dipped galvanized. d. Steel J Runners: 212 JR 7 and 400 JR 7 hot dipped galvanized. e. Fasteners: 3/8″ Type S-12 pan head screws; 1″ Type S screws.

499. Install in strict accordance with manufacturer’s printed instructions and code requirements. SECTION 09 22 13 – METAL FURRING 500. Comply with applicable requirements of ASTM C-841 as applicable. 501. Where metal furring is a component of an assembly for which a fire resistive rating is shown or

required, provide components complying with UL design assemblies shown. 502. Furring channels shall be hot or cold-rolled type. SECTION 09 22 16 – NON-STRUCTURAL METAL FRAMING 503. Framing Members, General: Comply with ASTM C 754 for conditions indicated.

504. Steel Sheet Components: Comply with ASTM C 645 requirements for metal, unless otherwise

indicated.

505. Protective Coating: ASTM A 653/A 653M, G40, hot-dip galvanized, unless otherwise indicated.

506. Steel Studs and Runners: ASTM C 645.

a. Minimum Base-Metal Thickness: 0.0188 inch. b. Depth: As indicated.

SECTION 09 30 00 – TILING 508. Ceramic Tile shall be used in the restrooms for the walls. 509. Wall Tile: Nominal 4″ X 4″ glazed, through body, porcelain tile in a 3 color pattern. 510. ANSI Tile Installation Standard: Comply with parts of ANSI 108 series of tile installation

standards included under “American National Standard Specifications for the Installation of Ceramic Tile” that apply to type of setting and grouting materials and methods indicated.

511. TCNA Installation Guidelines: TCNA “Handbook for Ceramic Tile Installation”; comply with TCNA

installation methods appropriate for site conditions. 512. Grout tile to comply with the requirements for ceramic tile grouts with ANSI A108.10. 513. Seal tile per manufacturer’s written instructions with sealer recommended for the tile installed.

Double seal all joints. 514. Install wall tile per TCNA Method No. W243 and per manufactures printed instructions.

515. Floor Tile:

a. Through color, 3/8” minimum thickness. b. Cove tile bases shall be used in all restroom applications. c. Grout joints shall not exceed 1/8”. Use a dark color grout on flooring.

 

 

 

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516. Wall Tile:

a. Wall tile dimensions shall be 4” x 4” x 5/16”. b. Restrooms shall be glazed, flat tile, thick‐set on wet walls, thin‐set other. Tile shall be

full height on the wet walls. c. Grout joints shall not exceed 1/16”.

SECTION 09 51 13 – ACOUSTICAL PANEL CEILINGS 517. Standard for Acoustical Ceiling Units: Provide manufacturers’ standard units of configuration

indicated that comply with ASTM E 1264 classifications as designated by reference to types, patterns, acoustical ratings, and light reflectance, unless otherwise indicated.

a. Basis of Design Product: “Dune” angled tegular as manufactured by Armstrong. 518. Type, Form, and Finish: Provide Type III, Form 2, Pattern CE, Class A, units per ASTM E 1264,

moisture and sag resistant with tegular edge and painted finish that comply with other requirements indicated.

a. Minimum NRC factor of 0.90 to 1.00, minimum STC rating of 25 to 29, minimum reflectance 75%.

b. Size: 2’ by 2’ by 3/4 inch. 519. Standard for Metal Suspension Systems: Provide manufacturer’s standard 16/15 inch wide metal

suspension systems of types, structural classifications, and finishes indicated that comply with applicable ASTM C 635 requirements.

520. Wire for Hangers and Ties: ASTM A 641, Class 1 zinc coating, soft temper. Gage: Provide wire

sized so that stress at 3 times hanger design load (ASTM C 635, Table 1, Direct-Hung), will be less than yield stress of wire, but provide not less than 0.106-inch diameter (12 gage).

521. Edge Moldings and Trim: Manufacturer’s standard moldings for edges and penetrations that fit

type of edge detail and suspension system indicated. 522. Wide-Face Capped Double-Web Steel Suspension System: Main and cross-runners roll-formed

from prepainted or electrolytic zinc-coated cold-rolled steel sheet, with prefinished 15/16-inch- wide metal caps on flanges.

a. Basis of Design Product: “Prelude” as manufactured by Armstrong. 523. Suspension systems shall conform to the Intermediate Duty Classification of ASTM. 524. Suspension system shall have baked enamel finish (white). 525. Extra Stock: 2% extra stock material, over actual area used, of each color, size and style. SECTION 09 61 00 – FLOORING TREATMENT (SEALERS) 526. Provide products that comply with the following requirements:

a. VOC compliant b. Oil and chemical resistance c. Eliminates dusting of concrete surfaces d. Maintains slip resistance of 0.86 dry and 0.69 wet

527. Available Products: Subject to compliance with requirements, products that may be incorporated

into the Work include, but are not limited to, the following 1. Permanent Sealer:

a. “Euco Diamond Hard,” Euclid Chemical Co.

 

 

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b. “Ashford Formula,” Curecrete Distribution, Inc. c. “Protecrete with Repeller,” Applied Concrete Technology, Inc. d. “ChemTec One,” ChemTec International

SECTION 09 65 13 – RESILIENT BASE AND ACCESSORIES 2. Molded 100 percent rubber cove base top set type shall be 4″ high x 1/8″ thick, minimum 30 foot

lengths. 4 foot long sections are unacceptable. Color shall match existing.

SECTION 09 65 16 – RESILIENT SHEET FLOORING 528. Flooring System: FloorScore compliance.

529. Products: Subject to compliance with requirements, provide nornament “Grano” flooring and

strair treads and risers as manufactured by Nora Systems, Inc., available products that may be incorporated into the Work subject to Architect approval, include the following:

a. Flexco b. Johnsonite c. PRF USA Inc. d. R.C.A. Rubber Company (The)

530. Product Name: norament

® grano.

531. Material: Nora rubber compound 926 with abundant natural fillers and environmentally compatible

color pigments. 532. Surface: Hammered. 533. Color: As selected from manufacture’s full range (no exceptions).

534. Installation Materials:

a. Trowelable leveling and patching compounds. b. Adhesives: Low VOC.

SECTION 09 65 19 – RESILIENT TILE FLOORING 535. Vinyl composition tile shall conform to FS SS-T-312, Type IV, Composition 1, 12″ x 12″, 1/8″ thick.

Colors as selected from standard patterns and colors. Direction of graining shall be as directed. Lay out work so that, as far as practicable, no piece of tile shall be less than 5″ wide, particularly at doors.

536. Flooring Adhesives: As per flooring manufacturer’s recommendations except that cut back adhesives shall not be used.

537. Edging strips: 1/8” thick, vinyl or rubber, tapered nose edge, color to match tile.

538. Underlayment: As per flooring manufacturer’s recommendations.

539. Lay tile in a square pattern, without special borders, symmetrical about the axis of the room or

space. All joints shall be tight, in true alignment, and as inconspicuous as possible.

540. Provide underlayment as required to bring resilient tile surface to the same level as abutting flooring.

SECTION 09 66 23 – RESINOUS MATRIX TERRAZZO FLOORING (EPOXY-RESIN) 541. Primer: Manufacturer’s product recommended for substrate and use indicated.

 

 

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542. Epoxy-Resin Matrix: Manufacturer’s standard recommended for use indicated and in color

required for mix indicated.

543. Terrazzo: Thin-set complying with NTMA’s “Terrazzo Specifications and Design Guide” and manufacturer’s written instructions for matrix and marble-chip and aggregate proportions and mixing.

544. Custom Mix Color and Pattern: Work with Architect to develop colors and patterns to accomplish

complete floor design as indicated. Architect estimates approximately 3 different colors/patterns to accomplish floor design.

a. Custom Mixes: Architect will not use gemstones, metals (other than accessories or divider strips), or plastics as elements of custom mix.

b. Divider strip patterns: Architect may use divider strips as a design element with no other purpose than esthetic effect.

545. Thin-Set Divider Strips: L-type angle or T-type, 1/4 inch (6.4 mm) deep.

a. Material: White-zinc alloy. b. Top Width: 1/4 inch (6.4 mm).

SECTION 09 68 13 – TILE CARPETING 546. Carpeting shall be installed in the Offices, and areas as indicated. 547. Style: 24 inch X 24 inch tiles. 548. Basis of Design: Shaw Contract Group.(Manufactured by Mohawk Industries).

a. Construction: Multi-level Pattern Loop. b. Fiber: 100 percent eco solution Q ® nylon. c. Dye Method: 100% Solution dyed. d. Warranties: 10 year Limited Warranty e. Gage: 1/12. f. Stitches per inch: 10.0 g. Finished Pile Thickness: 0.121 inches. h. Static Control: AATCC Test 134 – Less Than 3.0 KV i. Methenamine Pill Test (DOC FF-1-70): Passes j. Flooring Radiant Panel (ASTM D-648): Class 1. k. Smoke Density (ASTM E-662): Less than 450 (Flaming Mode) l. Traffic Class: Heavy

549. Carpet Backing: As recommended by carpet manufacturer. 550. Carpet Adhesive: Water resistant and nonstaining as recommended by carpet manufacturer to

comply with flammability requirements for installed carpet. 551. Warranties:

a. Wear: Warrant that the carpet will lose no more than 10% by weight of pile face fiber during the life of the carpet when installed and maintained in accordance with manufacturer’s procedures.

b. Static Protection: warrant that the carpet will give protection from static discharge in excess of 3.0 KV when tested under the standard Shuffle Test Method (at 7o degrees F and 20% R.H.) during the Life of the Carpet.

c. Backing De‐lamination: Warrant that the secondary backing of the carpet will not de‐ laminate during the life of the carpet.

 

 

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d. Edge Ravel: Warrant that under normal use, the carpet will not ravel at the seams or at the edge during the life of the carpet. Seam sealers or seam welds should not be required for warranties.

e. No dimensional instability (i.e., shrinkage, curling and doming) which adversely affect the ability of the tile to lie flat.

f. Specify that a special project warranty from the installer of a minimum of a 2 year full warranty to fix, repair or replace carpeting failure as the result of defective workmanship.

SECTION 09 72 00 – WALL COVERINGS 552. Basis of Design Product: Wall coverings that may be incorporated into the Work include, but are

not limited to, the following:

a. Vinyl Wallcovering: Lanark “Trafalgar. 553. Adhesive: Mildew-resistant, nonstaining adhesive, for use with wall covering and substrate

application, as recommended by wall covering manufacturer. SECTION 09 81 00 – ACOUSTIC INSULATION 554. Sound attenuation blanket shall be fiberglass sound barrier blankets, thickness as indicated, 0.75

PCF density. Material to have fire hazard classification:

Flame Spread 20 Fuel Contributed 15 Smoke Developed 20

555. Install sound attenuation blankets in stud cavities of sound rated partitions, attaching to one layer

of wallboard. Butt ends of blankets closely together and fill all voids. Allow air space between backs of blankets and back of the opposite face layer.

SECTION 09 84 33 – SOUND ABSORBING WALL UNITS

556. Basis-of-Design Product: “Sound Silencer” acoustical wall panels as manufactured by Acoustical

Surfaces, Inc or comparable product acceptable to the Architect. 557. Sound-Absorbing Wall Panel: Manufacturer’s standard panel construction consisting of porous

expanded polypropylene (PEPP) acoustical bead foam.

a. Class A Fire Rating. b. Acoustical panels shall be impervious to moisture, excessive humidity or water. c. Acoustical panels shall be impact resistant. d. Thickness 2 inches (51 mm) thick. e. Color: as selected from manufacturer’s standard colors (white or charcoal). f. Edge: Square. g. Width: As indicated. h. Length: As indicated. i. Mounting: Provide concealed fasteners, and Bonded Acoustical Pad for complete

single source installation. Back mount with manufacturer’s standard mechanical fasteners, secured to substrate.

SECTION 09 91 00 – PAINTING 558. Provide all painting and finishing required for unfinished surfaces. 559. Paint shall be on the Master Painters Institute (MPI) Approved Products List for the use indicated.

 

 

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560. Before painting, remove hardware, accessories, plates, lighting fixtures and similar items or provide ample protection of such items. On completion of each space, replace above items. Protect adjacent surfaces as required or directed.

561. Perform all work using only experienced, competent painters in accordance with the best

standards of practice in the trade. Roll or brush interior work. When completed, the painting shall represent a first-class workmanlike appearance. Apply all paint materials under adequate illumination.

562. Exposed water, gas, waste piping, exposed conduit, lighting panels, telephone terminal boxes

and galvanized or insulated ducts, shall be painted in all areas other than mechanical rooms. 563. Stain or paint only when surfaces are clean, dry, smooth and adequately protected from

dampness. Each coat of paint shall be well applied, worked out evenly and allowed to dry at least 24 hours before the subsequent coat is applied. Finished work shall be uniform, of approved color, smooth and free from runs, sags, clogging or excessive flooding. Make edges of paint adjoining other materials or colors sharp and clean without overlapping. Where high gloss enamel is used, lightly sand undercoats to obtain a smooth finish coat.

564. Apply 2 coat applications over proper primer, filler or pre-treatment for each Type of surface.

Walls and ceilings to be flat. Restroom gypsum board shall be semi-gloss, and metal finishes shall be gloss.

 

DIVISION 10 – SPECIALTIES SECTION 10 11 16 – MARKERBOARDS 565. The minimum vertical writing surface per room shall be not less than 80 s.f.

566. Vertical writing surfaces shall have a continuous tray at the base for chalk, markers and erasers.

They shall have a top 1″ cork strip.

567. Two sets of markers shall be included with every 8′ of marker board. Two erasers and four map clips shall be included with every 8′ of chalk or marker board.

568. Installation Method: As recommended in writing by carpet tile manufacturer. 569. Markerboards shall be 24 gage porcelain enamel with backing of 1/4″ hardboard core with

aluminum foil back. 570. Core material shall be Cortron ½” thick industrial grade particle board complying with ANSI

A208.1, Grade 1-M-1. 571. Backing sheet shall be 0.015″ aluminum. Laminating adhesive shall consist of moisture resistant

thermoplastic adhesive. 572. Color of finished face shall be white, non-glare matte type finish. 573. Warranty: Fifteen-year replacement warranty for marker boards. Warranty shall protect against;

deterioration of original writing and erasing qualities, becoming slick or shiny, crazing, cracking or flaking.

574. Trim system shall be clear aluminum including frames, tray, perimeter trim, and hooks. 575. Factory fabricate markerboards and deliver to job site ready for installation. Sections up to 12

feet shall be one piece, sections over 12 feet shall be arranged with joints symmetrically placed. 576. Provide size as indicated.

 

 

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SECTION 10 14 00 – SIGNAGE 577. Custom designed signs: Fabricate sign plates of the size, thickness and precision engraved

letters, numbers and figures with uniform margins, in the letter style and size directed.

578. Structural Performance: Provide signs capable of withstanding the effects of gravity, wind, and seismic loads and stresses.

579. Deflection of signs and supports in vertical and horizontal direction is limited to 1/360 of clear span or 3/4 inch (19 mm), whichever is smaller.

580. Thermal Movements: Provide post and panel signs that allow for thermal movements resulting from the following maximum change (range) in ambient and surface temperatures by preventing buckling, opening of joints, overstressing of components, failure of connections, and other detrimental effects. Base engineering calculation on surface temperatures of materials due to both solar heat gain and nighttime-sky heat loss.

a. Temperature Change (Range): 120 deg F (67 deg C), ambient; 180 deg F (100 deg C), material surfaces.

581. General: For the fabrication of exposed metal work, use only materials which are smooth and free

of surface blemishes including pitting, roughness, seam marks roller marks, and trade names. Do not use materials which have stains or discolorations.

a. Provide stretcher leveled standard of flatness.

582. Aluminum Sheet and Plate: ASTM B 209 (ASTM B 209M), alloy and temper recommended by aluminum producer and finisher for type of use and finish indicated, and with at least the strength and durability properties of alloy 5005-H15.

a. Thickness: Provide aluminum sheets and plates in sizes indicated.

583. Aluminum Extrusions: ASTM B 221 (ASTM B 221M), alloy and temper recommended by aluminum producer and finisher for type of use and finish indicated, and with at least the strength and durability properties of alloy 6063-T5.

584. General: Type style shall be as indicated.

a. Typeface and numerals shall be computer digitized by one manufacturer and used for each applicable sign types.

b. Characters indicated on the Drawings are intended as guidelines for layouts and font size only, and are based on scale calculations of the message lengths within given and estimated sign areas. Drawings and schedules indicate the copy required on individual signs. Should conflicts arise in the final message layout, notify the Architect before proceeding.

c. Spelling and punctuation shall be correct. Should an error in spelling or punctuation be found, or the spelling appears questionable, notify the Architect before proceeding.

d. Align letter forms to maintain a baseline parallel to the sign format, unless otherwise indicated. Maintain uniform margins in sign layouts.

e. Suite Identification Signs: Owner will determine names of each individual suite.

585. Tactile and Braille Copy: Manufacturer’s standard process for producing copy complying with ADA Accessibility Guidelines and ICC/ANSI A117.1. Text shall be accompanied by Grade 2 braille. Produce precisely formed characters with square cut edges free from burrs and cut marks.

a. Panel Material: Opaque acrylic sheet or photopolymer. b. Raised-Copy Thickness: Not less than 1/32 inch (0.8 mm).

 

 

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c. For Grade 2 Braille copy, coordinate messages in conjunction with Graphic and Sign Schedule. Braille copy contained on drawings is for size and position only and shall not be used for full message.

586. Plastic shall be free of imperfections from forming or fabrication. All surfaces shall be free from

scratches and shall be cleaned and polished per manufacturer’s instructions at completion of installation. Edges shall be flame polished, free of saw marks and chips, and be eased, unless otherwise noted.

587. Monolithic Acrylic Sheet: ASTMD4802, Category A-1 (cell-cast sheet), Type UVA (UV absorbing), of thickness indicated, with Finish 1 (smooth or polished finish).

588. Provide vinyl graphic film suitable for interior and exterior applications.

589. Adhesive: Clear, pressure sensitive, permanent adhesive.

590. Fasteners: Unless otherwise indicated, use concealed fasteners fabricated from metals that are non-corrosive to either the sign material or the mounting surface, if concealed fasteners are not practical or possible, provide vandal-resistant fasteners.

591. Fabricate signs to comply with requirements indicated on drawings for materials, thicknesses, finishes, colors, designs, shapes, sizes, and details of construction.

592. Chemically-etched Zinc Sign Panels: Sign copy shall be raised 1/32 inch from plaque first surface. Provide opaque graphics and Braille to comply with ADA regulations.

a. Thickness: 0.125 inch (3.2 mm). b. Zinc Finish: Manufacturer’s “Replica Finish”.

593. Graphics: As indicated.

594. Illuminated-Sign Units: Provide internal illumination using concealed, internally wired, LED system

to illuminate message panels uniformly with minimum halation and without light leaks. Include LED’s, transformers, and other components necessary for complete systems. Make provisions for servicing and concealing transformers and connections to building electrical system. Coordinate electrical characteristics with those of power supply provided. Loading shall be verified by following the testing procedures recommended by the LED-systems manufacturer.

a. Population: Maximum 4-inch spacing between LED strips or segments.

595. Channel Characters: Fabricate letters and numbers to the required sizes and styles, using metals and thicknesses indicated below. Form exposed faces and sides of characters to produce surfaces free from warp and distortion. Include internal bracing for stability and attachment of mounting accessories as required. Fabricate by the heliarc welding process.

a. Aluminum Sheet: Not less than 0.090 inch thick. b. Finish: Manufacturer’s custom color urethane. c. Color: As indicated on the Drawings.

596. Reverse Channel Characters: Fabricate letters and numbers to the required sizes and styles,

using metals and thicknesses indicated below. Form exposed faces and sides of characters to produce surfaces free from warp and distortion. Include internal bracing for stability and attachment of mounting accessories as required. Fabricate by the heliarc welding process.

a. Aluminum Sheet: Not less than 0.090 inch thick. b. Finish: Manufacturer’s custom color urethane. c. Color: As indicated on the Drawings.

 

 

 

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597. Non-illuminated Directories: Provide a surface mounted, non-illuminated directory consisting of a cabinet with an operable transparent cover, and a retainer frame containing a header panel and a letter board or removable message strips. Graphics for message strips, header panels, and other designs shall be in the letter style, size, spacing, and arrangement indicated.

SECTION 10 21 13 – TOILET COMPARTMENTS

598. Ceiling hung toilet compartments and wall-hung urinal screens. 599. Plastic Laminate Toilet Compartments:

a. A random pattern (no solid colors). b. Alternative patterns:

1. Wilson Art: Agean 1762-60, or Storm Nebula 4634-60 or 2. Pionite: Suede Rose Chromatix AR221-S

600. Door Hardware: Manufacturer’s standard hinges, pulls, bumpers, latches and keepers, and coat

hooks, fabricated from stainless steel. SECTION 10 22 26 – OPERABLE PARTITIONS 601. Work includes manually operated, acoustical panel partitions with whiteboards where indicated.

602. Operable Acoustical Panels: Operable acoustical panel partition system, including panels, seals,

finish facing, suspension system, operators, and accessories (including whiteboards). 603. Basis-of-Design Product: Subject to compliance with requirements, provide product

manufactured by Modernfold, Inc.; a DORMA Group Company or comparable product by one of the following:

a. FolDoor; Holcomb & Hoke Mfg. Co., Inc. b. Hufcor, Inc. c. Moderco Inc. d. Modernfold, Inc.; a DORMA Group Company. e. Panelfold Inc

604. Panel Operation: Manually operated pairs of panels.

605. Panel Construction: Provide top reinforcement as required to support panel from suspension

components and provide reinforcement for hardware attachment. Fabricate panels with tight hairline joints and concealed fasteners. Fabricate panels so finished in-place partition is rigid; level; plumb; aligned, with tight joints and uniform appearance; and free of bow, warp, twist, deformation, and surface and finish irregularities.

606. Dimensions: Fabricate operable acoustical panel partitions to form an assembled system of dimensions indicated and verified by field measurements.

a. STC: Not less than 52. b. Panel Closure: Manufacturer’s standard. c. Hardware: Manufacturer’s standard as required to operate operable panel partition

and accessories; with decorative, protective finish SECTION 10 26 13 – CORNER GUARDS 607. Corner Guards Basis of Design: Mercer #691 3/16″ x 2.5″ x 2.5″ x 54″. 608. Fire-Test-Response Characteristics: Provide impact-resistant wail protection system components

with the following surface-burning characteristics, as determined by testing materials identical to those required in this Section per ASTM E 84 by a testing and inspecting agency acceptable to

 

 

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authorities having jurisdiction. Identify impact-resistant wail protection system components with appropriate markings of applicable testing and inspecting agency.

a. Flame Spread: 25 or less. b. Smoke Developed: 450 or less.

609. Impact Strength: Provide impact-resistant wall protection system components with a minimum

impact resistance of 25.4 ft-lbf/in. (1356 J/m) of width when tested according to ASTM D 256, Test Method A.

SECTION 10 28 00 – TOILET, BATH AND LAUNDRY ACCESSORIES

610. This Section includes the following:

a. Toilet and bath accessories. b. Childcare accessories. c. Underlavatory guards. d. Custodial accessories.

611. Toilet and Bath Accessories:

a. A & J Washroom Accessories, Inc. b. American Specialties, Inc. c. Bobrick Washroom Equipment, Inc. d. Bradley Corporation. e. General Accessory Manufacturing Co. (GAMCO).

612. Childcare accessories:

a. American Specialties, Inc. b. Bobrick Washroom Equipment, Inc. c. General Accessory Manufacturing Co. (GAMCO). d. Koala Corporation.

613. Underlavatory Guards:

a. Plumberex Specialty Products, Inc. b. TCI Products. c. Truebro, Inc.

614. Provide stainless steel units unless noted otherwise. 615. Stainless Steel: AISI Type 302/304, with polished No. 4 finish, 0.034-inch (22-gage) minimum

thickness. 616. Provide toilet accessories of the same manufacturer for each type of accessory unit and for units

exposed in the same areas wherever possible. Stamped names or labels on exposed faces of units will not be permitted.

617. Provide anchors, bolts and other necessary fasteners, and attach accessories securely to walls and partitions. Use concealed fastening wherever possible.

618. Mirror Glass: Nominal 6.0-mm (0.23-inch) thick, conforming to ASTM C 1036, Type I, Class 1,

Quality q2, and with silvering, electro-plated copper coating, and protective organic coating.

619. Accessory Schedule:

 

 

 

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Product Description Series/Model No. (Bobrick except as

indicated)

Remarks

Paper Towel Dispenser Kimberly Clark, Model 9736 (single) Model 9755 (double)

2’ X 2” Lever handle operated.

Countertop Paper Towel Dispenser B-526 C-fold or multi-fold

Toilet Seat Cover Dispenser B-301 3 inch recess

Toilet Paper Dispenser Georga Pacific: “Cormatic” 2 roll, Model 4c

Color as selected by Architect.

Baby Station – Horizontal Koala KB110-SSRE

4 inch recess; stainless steel with liner dispenser

Single Line Grab Bars B-6806 Series Length as indicated on the Drawings.

Shower Grab Bars B-6861 Right Angled Shower Stall

Foam Soap Dispenser Waxie Nice Touch 800 ml, black.

1 dispenser per 2 sinks.

Mirrors B-290 18 x 36 unless otherwise indicated.

Napkin/Tampon Dispenser B-282 25 Surface mounted. One unit per each ladies stall.

Sanitary Napkin Disposal B-354 Partition mounted between two com- partments

Sanitary Napkin Disposal B-254 Surface mounted

Mop and Broom Holder B-223 36″ -4 hooks

Coat Hook B-2116 Concealed fasteners

Clothes Hook B-6777 Concealed fasteners- satin stainless

Stainless Steel Shelf B-298 8 inch deep shelf-x 18

Stainless Steel Shelf B-295 5 inch deep shelf-x 24

Folding Shower Seat B-517 Right hand

B-518 Left hand

 

SECTION 10 44 13 – FIRE PROTECTION CABINETS

620. Provide fire extinguishers and cabinets at locations as required by code. 621. Rating of extinguishers to be 5A10BC, multi-purpose chemical type. 622. Cabinets to be semi-recessed with solid metal door with break glass enclosure for latch. Cabinet

shall be stainless steel.

 

 

 

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SECTION 10 51 13 – METAL LOCKERS 623. Work includes the following:

a. Wardrobe Locker Configurations: b. Two-tier lockers; 12 inch wide by 18 inch (300 mm by 450 mm) deep individual units.

624. Products: Subject to compliance with requirements, provide one of the following products:

a. All Welded Wardrobe Lockers (Heavy Duty Applications): b. Art Metal Products; Bulldog or Champ Corridor Lockers. c. DeBourgh Mfg. Co.; Sentry Corridor/Personnel Lockers. d. List Industries Inc.; Marquis Protector. e. Lyon Workspace Products, LLC; All-Welded Lockers. f. Penco Products, Inc.; All-Welded Lockers.

625. Accessible Lockers: Provide accessible lockers as indicated on the Drawings, but at least one

locker in each Locker Room.

626. Metallic-Coated Steel Sheet: ASTM A 653/A 653M, Commercial Steel (CS), Type B; with A60 (ZF180) zinc-iron, alloy (galvannealed) coating designation. Expanded Metal: ASTM F 1267, Type II (flattened), Class I, 3/4-inch (19-mm) steel mesh, with at least 70 percent open area.

627. Steel Tube: ASTM A 500, cold rolled. 628. Fasteners: Zinc- or nickel-plated steel, slotless-type exposed bolt heads, and self-locking nuts or

lock washers for nuts on moving parts. Anchors: Material, type, and size required for secure anchorage to each substrate.

629. Provide nonferrous-metal or hot-dip galvanized anchors and inserts on inside face of exterior walls, and elsewhere as indicated, for corrosion resistance. Provide toothed-steel or lead expansion sleeves for drilled-in-place anchors.

630. Body: Assembled by welding body components together. Fabricate from unperforated, cold-

rolled steel sheet with thicknesses as follows:

a. Tops, Bottoms, and Sides: 0.0528 inch (1.35 mm) thick. b. Backs: 0.0428 inch (1.1 mm) thick.

631. Shelves: 0.0528 inch (1.35 mm) thick, with double bend at front and single bend at sides and

back.

632. Frames: Channel formed; fabricated from 0.0528-inch- (1.35-mm-) thick, cold-rolled steel sheet; lapped and factory welded at corners; with top and bottom main frames factory welded into vertical main frames. Form continuous, integral door strike full height on vertical main frames.

633. Locker Base: Structural channels, formed from 0.0528-inch- (1.35-mm-) thick, cold-rolled steel sheet; welded to front and rear of side-panel frames.

634. Doors: One-piece; fabricated from 0.0677-inch- (17-mm-) thick, cold-rolled steel sheet; formed

into channel shape with double bend at vertical edges, and with right-angle single bend at horizontal edges. Fabricate to prevent springing when opening or closing, and to swing 180 de- grees.

635. Interior Equipment: Furnish each locker with the following items, unless otherwise indicated:

a. Hooks: Manufacturer’s standard zinc-plated, ball-pointed steel. Provide one double– prong ceiling hook, and not fewer than two single-prong wall hooks for single-, double-, and triple-tier units. Attach hooks with at least two fasteners.

b. Coat Rods: Fabricated from 1-inch-(25-mm-) diameter steel; chrome finished.

636. Number Plates: Manufacturer’s standard aluminum number plates with numerals at least 3/8 inch (9 mm) high. Number lockers in sequence indicated. Attach plates to each locker door, near top, centered, with at least two aluminum rivets.

637. Continuous Metal Base: Minimum 0.0598-inch- (1.50-mm-) thick steel sheet, channel or zee profiled for stiffness, fabricated in lengths as long as practicable to enclose base and base ends of lockers, and finished to match lockers.

 

 

 

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SECTION 10 56 16 – FABRICATED WOOD STORAGE SHELVING 638. Provide prefabricated wood storage shelving. 639. Material: Plywood shelving minimum 3/4″ thick with edge facing. 640. Supports: Double solid lumber supports with adjustable positioning.

DIVISION 11 – EQUIPMENT SECTION 11 14 13 – TURNSTILES 641. Turnstiles – Basis of Design: Three-arm turnstiles, model V-73, as manufactured by Hardware

Specialties.

a. Welded end caps b. 25” width. c. 14” stainless steel arms. d. Stainless steel post. e. 5’-6” base and slip cover. f. Key resettable digital counter. g. Anchor mounted. h. High polish standard finish

SECTION 11 17 26 – CASH DROP SAFE 642. Cash Drop Safe – Basis of Design: Phoenix Cash Drop Safe model 992, as distributed by

Interbank Equipment. Front loading model. SECTION 11 31 00 – RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES

643. Install all equipment at locations indicated. Where equipment is to be built into cabinet work,

coordinate information with millwork supplier to assure adequate clearance.

644. Quality: Conform to NSF – National Sanitation Foundation requirements.

645. Electrical wiring and components and self-contained refrigeration systems: Conform to Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. (UL) standards.

646. Energy Ratings: Provide residential appliances that carry labels indicating energy-cost analysis (estimated annual operating costs) and efficiency information as required by the Federal Trade Commission.

647. Microwave Ovens: Freestanding microwave oven, listed by UL.

a. Type: Freestanding 1.6 cubic feet capacity microwave oven with 1100 watt power. b. Finish: Stainless Steel.

648. Top-Freezer Refrigerator: Provide one refrigerator/freezers complying with the following:

a. Type: Freestanding, frost-free, two-door, top-mount freezer, refrigerator/freezer with

ABS thermoplastic-copolymer interior cabinet liners. b. Refrigerator Storage Capacity: 21.7 cubic feet. c. Finish: Stainless Steel.

SECTION 11 52 13 – PROJECTION SCREENS 649. Provide wall mounted projection screen.

 

 

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650. Basis-of-Design Product: Subject to compliance with requirements, provide Draper, “Silhouette / Series C, manual projection screen or comparable product acceptable to the Owner and the Architect.

651. Screen Surface: Glass bead. 652. Size: As indicated. 653. Built-in tensioning to hold screen flat. 654. Aluminum case with end caps. 655. Warrantee: One year against defects in materials and workmanship.

SECTION 11 52 16 – PROJECTORS 656. Provide ceiling mounted overhead projector. 657. Basis-of-Design Product: Subject to compliance with requirements, provide “Pro Series 6

projector” or comparable product acceptable to the Owner and the Architect. 658. Capable of displaying 1080i high definition resolution. 659. Contrast Ratio: 700:1. 660. Rating of 1600 Asni lumens. 661. Short throw distance compatible with room size. 662. Provide cabling necessary for complete installation and operation. 663. Provide compatible ceiling mount capable of supporting 50 lbs.

DIVISION 12 – FURNISHINGS

SECTION 12 21 13 – HORIZONTAL LOUVER BLINDS

664. Horizontal louver blinds shall have nominally 1″ wide horizontal slats, supported by braided

ladders. It shall be possible to tilt the slats to any horizontal angle by means of a transparent wand and to raise and lower the slats to any height by means of lift cords. Visible components of the blind shall be selected from manufacturer’s standard colors.

665. Aluminum slats shall be 1″ wide plus or minus .003″.

SECTION 12 22 00 – CURTAINS AND DRAPES

666. Blackout Curtain: Blackout Liner: Vinyl-coated fabric in colors selected from manufacturer’s

available range.

667. Hembars and hempockets (for “blackout): 3/8 x 1-1/2 inches with vinyl seal and concealed attachment to shadecloth. Bevel top and bottom of hembar to smoothly travel up and down inside side channels. Extend shadeband and hembar into side channel as a single element where side channels are required.

SECTION 12 36 61 – SIMULATED STONE COUNTERTOPS

668. Cultured Marble Countertops:

a. Front: Straight, slightly eased edge.

 

 

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b. Backsplash and Endsplash: Eased at cove and top. c. Fabrication: One piece with integral sink bowls.

669. Solid-Surface-Material Countertops:

a. Front: Straight, slightly eased edge. b. Backsplash and Endsplash: Eased edge.

670. Countertops: 3/4-inch- (19-mm-) thick, solid surface material.

671. Fabrication: Provide integral sink bowls. SECTION 12 48 13 – ENTRANCE FLOOR MATS 672. Basis-of-Design Product: Subject to compliance with requirements, provide C/S Group “Pedigrid”

or a comparable product by one of the following:

a. C/S Group. b. J. L. Industries, Inc. c. Mats, Inc.

SECTION 12 61 00 – FIXED AUDIENCE SEATING

673. Description: Fixed upholstered seating with polyurethane foam back. Backrest automatically

follows the body’s movemnts, providing active back support.

674. Chair shell: Polypropylene shell with upholstered seat and backrest pads.

675. Base: Floor mounted.

676. Provide materials in colors and patterns as selected by Architect from manufacturers complete line of colors and patterns including premium colors.

677. Metal Finishes: Manufacture’s standard paint finish to match color of shell of seating.

678. Plastic laminate finish as specified by Architect from laminate manufacturer’s premium line.

SECTION 12 93 13 – BICYCLE RACKS 679. Material: Steel, manufacturer’s designer series.

680. Capacity: Four bicycles each rack.

681. Installation Method: Cast in concrete. SECTION 12 93 43 – SITE SEATING

682. Plastic Adirondack Chairs: Plastic Long Island adirondack chairs manufactured by Polywood.

Made with recycled plastic lumber and with stainless steel hardware. Color as selected from manufacturer’s standards.

DIVISION 13 – SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION (Not Used)

DIVISION 14 – CONVEYING EQUIPMENT

SECTION 14 21 13 – MACHINE ROOM-LESS FREIGHT ELEVATORS 683. Provide: Machine Room Less (MRL) gearless traction elevators.

 

 

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684. Basis of Design: ThyssenKrupp “synergy” building-supported Standard Series elevator with

Machine-Roomless application.

685. Travel (maximum): 60 ft. Freight elevator shall travel to roof.

686. Rated Capacity: 4000 lb.

687. Rated Speed: 200 fpm.

688. Platform Size: As indicated.

689. Clear Inside Dimensions: Minimum 5″ 8″ wide, 8″ 5″ deep.

690. Cab Height: 7’-10”.

691. Entrance Type and Width: Center-Open Doors 3’ 6” (1067 mm).

692. Entrance Height: 7’ 0” (2134 mm).

693. Car Lighting Power Supply: 120 Volts, Single-phase, 15 Amp, 60 Hz.

694. Signal Fixtures: Manufacturer’s standard with metal button targets.

695. Controller Location: Machine-Room Less Controllers shall be located at the front opening of the top terminal landing in entrance frame or remote location.

696. Operation: Simplex Collective Operation: Using a microprocessor-based controller, operation shall be automatic by means of the car and hall buttons. If all calls in the system have been answered, the car shall park at the last landing served.

697. Cab Design: a, Entrance Doors and Frames: Single speed doors, satin stainless steel.

b. Cab Walls: Satin stainless steel with manufacturer’s flat bar stainless steel railings at sides and rear of cab.

c. Ceiling: Manufacturer’s standard incandescent downlights in stainless steel ceiling. 698. Car and Hall Fixtures: Manufacturer’s standard hall lanterns and vandal resistant buttons. 699. Provide the Elevator Owner’s Manual to NAU as part of close-out submittals. SECTION 14 21 23 – MACHINE ROOM-LESS PASSENGER ELEVATORS 700. Provide: Machine Room Less (MRL) gearless traction elevators.

701. Basis of Design: ThyssenKrupp “synergy” building-supported Standard Series elevator with

Machine-Roomless application.

702. Travel (maximum): 46 ft.

703. Rated Capacity: 4000 lb.

704. Rated Speed: 200 fpm.

705. Platform Size: As indicated.

706. Clear Inside Dimensions: Minimum 5″ 8″ wide, 8″ 5″ deep.

 

 

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707. Cab Height: 7’-10”.

708. Entrance Type and Width: Center-Open Doors 3’ 6” (1067 mm).

709. Entrance Height: 7’ 0” (2134 mm).

710. Car Lighting Power Supply: 120 Volts, Single-phase, 15 Amp, 60 Hz.

711. Machine Location: Inside the hoistway at the top of the hoistway.

712. Signal Fixtures: Manufacturer’s standard with metal button targets.

713. Controller Location: Machine-Room Less Controllers shall be located at the front opening of the top terminal landing in entrance frame or remote location.

714. Operation: Simplex Collective Operation: Using a microprocessor-based controller, operation shall be automatic by means of the car and hall buttons. If all calls in the system have been answered, the car shall park at the last landing served.

715. Operating Features – Standard.

a. Full Collective Operation. b. Anti-nuisance. c. Fan and Light Protection. d. Load Weighing Bypass. e. Independent Service. f. Firefighters’ Service . g. Top of Car Inspection.

716. Cab Design: a, Entrance Doors and Frames: Single speed doors, satin stainless steel.

b. Cab Walls: Laminate with stainless steel dividers. c. Ceiling: Manufacturer’s standard incandescent downlights and ceiling. 717. Car and Hall Fixtures: Manufacturer’s standard hall lanterns and vandal resistant buttons. 718. Provide the Elevator Owner’s Manual to NAU as part of close-out submittals.

DIVISION 31 – EARTHWORK

SECTION 31 10 00 – SITE CLEARING 719. Clear and grub obstructions, trees, shrubs, and other vegetation, including grinding stumps and

removing roots and debris. 720. Provide temporary erosion- and sedimentation-control measures SECTION 31 20 00 – EARTH MOVING 721. Prepare subgrades for slabs-on-grade walks pavements, turf, grasses, and plants. 722. Provide excavating and backfilling for buildings and structures. 723. Provide subbase course for concrete walks and pavements. 724. Provide subbase course for asphalt paving. 725. Provide subsurface drainage backfill for walls and trenches.

 

 

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726. Provide excavating and backfilling trenches for utilities and pits for buried utility structures. 727. Excavate well hole to accommodate elevator-cylinder assembly. 728. Legally dispose of surplus and waste materials off Owner’s property. 729. Engage independent testing laboratory for testing and evaluation of earthwork. SECTION 31 31 16 – TERMITE CONTROL 730. Provide a working solution of termiticide in concentrations recommended by manufacturer. 731. Prepare surfaces and apply treatment at rates and concentrations recommended in

manufacturer’s written instructions. 732. Reapply soil termiticide treatment solution to areas disturbed by subsequent excavation or other

construction activities following application.

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

 

Appendix 2. DRAFT PROGRAM: SPACE REQUIREMENTS BY ROOM

The Draft Program is provided for User’s review, comments and confirmation of the requirements for spaces and areas. This document is based on the initial building program and the discussions held with the User Groups.

The final Program will be issued after all of the requirements are confirmed by the User Groups.

 

 

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Appendix 2. DRAFT PROGRAM: SPACE REQUIREMENTS BY ROOM TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Table of Contents 1

0.0 General Space Requirements 3

1.0 UG Admissions: 4

1.1 Auditorium

1.2 Reception/ Welcome Desk Area

1.3 Lobby/ Waiting Area

1.4 Conference Room

1.5 Director Office

1.6 Associate Director Office

1.7 Coordinator Offices

1.8 Admissions Officers Offices

1.9 Interview Rooms

1.10 Student Worker Space

1.11 Break Room/ Vending (shared w/ OSS Center)

1.12 Service Room (shared w/ OSS Center)

1.13 Storage Room (shared w/ OSS Center)

2.0 One-Stop Students Center: 17

2.1 Reception Area

2.2 Waiting Area Lounge

2.3 Advisor’s Area

2.4 Counseling Offices

2.5 Director Office

2.6 Associate Director Office

2.7 Staff Support Office/ Vault

2.8 Student Worker Space

2.9 Training Room (Shared w/ UG Admissions)

3.0 Math Center: 25

3.1 Main Center

3.2 Main Center Reception/ Help Desk

3.3 Computer Testing Lab

3.4 Tutorial Break Out Rooms

3.5 Classrooms

3.6 Students Study Rooms

3.7 Vending

3.8 Lounge: Undergraduate Tutors

3.9 Lounge: Faculty

3.10 Conference Room

3.11 Director Office

3.12 Faculty Offices

3.13 Staff Offices/ Course Coordinator Office

3.14 Storage

 

 

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4.0 Academic Offices: 41

4.1 Chair’s Offices

4.2 Staff Support Offices

4.3 Administrative Offices/ Reception Areas

4.4 Faculty Offices

4.5 Service Rooms

4.6 Conference Rooms

4.7 Faculty Lounge w/ Kitchenette

4.8 Collaboration Spaces

5.0 Support Spaces & Utilities: 50

5.1 Restrooms

5.2 Custodial: Janitor Closets

5.3 Custodial: Storage, Recycling

5.4 Telecommunication Rooms

 

 

 

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0.0 GENERAL SPACE REQUIREMENTS

 

Accessibility and Universal Design

Northern Arizona University is committed to providing equitable access to its working, learning and cultural activities for all individuals. As a general rule, all spaces of the building shall conform to the main principals of the Universal Design: Equitable use. Flexible use. Simple and Intuitive Use. Perceptible Information. Tolerance for Error. Low Physical Effort. Size and Space for Approach and Use.

Typical Office Space Requirements:

Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Refer to furniture schedule for fit-out of the standard 120 SF and 160 SF offices. Generally offices shall include: desk, chair, side chair, 6′-8′ bookcase, lockable file drawer.

Wall display/work surfaces Each office to have a small white board and a tac/ cork board.

Electrical, computer, data processing, or communications network needs Each Office Space to have a minimum of 3 power outlets (on separate walls) and 2 data ports on opposite walls.

Finishes or Space characteristics Floor: Carpet tile, 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 lay-in acoustical ceiling tile. Minimum ceiling height is 8 feet. Walls: Painted gypsum board

Refer to specific spaces for any additional requirements.

Acoustical Requirements

For Air‐borne and Structure‐borne sound attenuation, the following ratings for walls, floor and ceiling assemblies to be provided (unless noted otherwise): Offices to Corridors > 50 STC* Offices to Offices > 45 STC* Corridors, Lobby > 50 STC Restrooms > 50 STC Classrooms > 50 STC Conference Rooms > 50 STC Operable partitions > 52 STC Testing Lab > 60 STC Auditorium > 60 STC Doors to sound rated areas > 33 STC * Sound Transmission Class (STC) as tested in accordance with ASTM E90

Miscellaneous Building Services Requirements:

1. One defibrillator is required per floor. 2. Wayfinding system. 3. A minimum area of 5′ x 6′ for small copy machines and 6′ x 9′ in length for large copy machines by

shall be reserved in office area designs. 4. Terrazzo flooring in lobbies and corridors. 5. Informal Student spaces: plenty of outlets, soft seating. 6. Lockers: Metal Lockers

 

 

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1.0 General Information UG ADMISSIONS

Department Activities:

The Admissions Department assists potential students and their parents with the university admissions process. It is very important to create a high quality, relaxing space for the visitors to showcase the University.

The services provided are campus tours and one-on-one consultations with admissions officers. Visitors gather in a waiting area. Tours start with a presentation in the Auditorium and then visitors taken to tour the campus. The campus tour is 75 minutes long. Group sizes vary from 3 to 30.

Operation hours: 9am – 5pm. Department to be locked down after hours (all offices, lounge and support areas). Adjacency:

 The Admissions and the One Stop Center shall have separate and clearly distinguished entrances. NO shared lobby. Need to keep One Stop Center and angry/ frustrated students as far away from the Admissions entrance as possible.

 Admissions and One Stop to share: Training Room, Conference Room, Interview Rooms, Service Room and Storage.

 Bathrooms shall be located close to the Auditorium and the Waiting Lobby. General Comments: Majority of the visitors will approach the building from the Parking Garage. Currently Admissions have an agreement with the Garage for several parking spaces on the south side. No need to put card readers to each office. In addition to the code required plumbing provide extra plumbing fixtures to serve large groups of visitors.

 

 

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1.1 Auditorium UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities

The Auditorium used regularly all year (summer included), but only during the office hours. It can be used for other functions in the evenings.

150 people are using the space all at one time and are moving to the Auditorium in one large group. The Auditorium is to have large windows at presenter side for when prospective students and parents

are waiting for the presentation (showcase/frame views). During presentations windows are shaded and the screen drops in front of them. Students passing on the street shall not be able to see into the space. Adjacency: Locate next to the Admissions Waiting Area, Restrooms, and Exterior Plaza. Auditorium is to be entered from Admissions. It is preferred NOT have a view to the South (Sechrist Hall). Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 150* 25 3,750

*150 persons count includes 10% of ADA spaces.

There needs to be at least 6 foot of circulation around the three sides and 12 foot space at the front of the room for props and presentations. The room is to be sloped/ tiered. Per the Admissions Department comments, the space does not have to be tiered. A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

150 Fixed Seating. Tablets will not be required for the seating. 10% of all seats to be ADA accessible.

TBD Exterior seating Exterior furniture should be included in the FF&E package. The students seem to love the Adirondacks seating

TBD Movable Lectern

It would be great if the Plaza next to the Auditorium had a fireplace and some seating surrounding it. B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Provide storage space for T-shirts and giveaways. C. Wall display/work surfaces (NA) D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting TBD G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Sound rated: >60 STC. Space designed for good listening.

 

 

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I. Audio/visual systems and equipment

 Good acoustics and speaker system with microphone, standard podium, document/pad camera, LCD projector (may require more than one) sufficient to the room. Multi-purpose movable podium is needed because sometimes different elements or props are used

 Two screens are preferred with option to use one or both. There is also a need to stream videos as well as have background music.

 Five large screen monitors for rotating images of campus life. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs TBD K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: Carpet tile, 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: Feature acoustical ceiling. Ceiling height is 12-14 feet. Walls: Painted gypsum board. Feature acoustical panels. Black out shades to exterior windows.

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes TBD

 

 

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1.2 Reception Counter/ Welcome Desk UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities: First area to meet and great potential students and their parents. The reception desk will be manned by 4 people. This area needs to be walled off from the Main Lobby and especially the stairs with card access. Adjacency: Locate directly at the entrance to the Admissions, next to the Admissions Waiting Area Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 4-6 80 480

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

1 Small refrigerator at the reception desk

When the tour starts, there is give away water at the reception.

4 Computers At the Reception

4 Chairs At the Reception

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Casework Counter. C. Wall display/work surfaces Wall space to showcase NAU. D. HVAC or special ventilation needs (NA) E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting Feature lighting at the Reception. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Space to serve as a buffer between Main Lobby and Waiting area. I. Audio/visual systems and equipment Display monitors, coordinate with the Waiting area. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs TBD. Computer stations at the Reception desk. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Panic button at the Reception Desk. Card access to the area. L. Finishes or Space characteristics Looking for a quality feel of the space.

 

 

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1.3 Lobby/ Waiting Area UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities

Used by prospective students and parents to wait for a tour, or an appointment with Admission Officers. The space should feel relaxing for visitors, who drive for couple of hours to come over to visit the University. Do not need to have vending in the space. At the moment the arriving parents get a voucher to the Starbucks across the road. Adjacency Locate next to the Auditorium. Separate from the One-Stop Center. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 50 25 1,250

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

TBD Seating for visitors. Soft seating. Chairs at the iPad bars.

1-2 Table or rack for brochures.

 

2 iPad bars To be used by visitors to sit down and check their e-mail.

1 Fireplace

Add a warm inviting feeling. An electric wall hung unit would work fine.

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Space for a “rack” for pamphlets in admissions near counter/lobby. C. Wall display/work surfaces Wall space to showcase NAU. D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting Special lighting at the seating areas. USB outlets at iPad bar. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs A quiet space that is not affected by sounds from the Main Lobby. I. Audio/visual systems and equipment 3x Large screen monitors to show views of the campus. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Power and data at iPod bars. Wireless internet for visitors. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics Looking for a quality feel of the space.

 

 

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1.4 Conference Room UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities

Will be used by both the Admissions and One Stop Students Center. Staff meetings, as well as meeting with parents and other functions. Not for general building use. Adjacency Locate centrally. To be shared with One Stop Center. Does not have to be adjacent to the Waiting Lobby. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 15-20 30 600

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

1 Conference room table. Surface tray with power and data outlets.

20 Chairs

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Provide large counter space with storage. Pull-out rack at counter for equipment. C. Wall display/work surfaces White boards. D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting Conference room lighting. Plenty of power outlets above counter. Floor power and data box for a conference table. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Sound rated: >50 STC. I. Audio/visual systems and equipment:

Two large screens at each side of the room. Projectors. Monitors are not desirable as the presentation area is too small for a room of this size. Provisions for video conferencing, webinars.

J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Wireless internet access. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Card access. To be programmed to be used by both departments. L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: carpet tile. 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 lay-in acoustical ceiling tile. Walls: Painted gypsum board

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: TBD

 

 

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1.5 Director Office UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities Adjacency The Director and Assistant Director offices are to be located within the enclosed Admissions space. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 1 160 160

Refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

1.6 Associate Director Office UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities Adjacency Locate next to Waiting area. The Director and Assistant Director offices are to be located within the enclosed Admissions space. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 1 160 160

Refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

1.7 Coordinator Offices UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities Coordinators meet with parents. The rooms are to be set up for two part time staff members. Adjacency Locate close to Lobby/ Waiting area. The three coordinator offices should be together. Does not have to be adjacent to the Waiting Lobby. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

3 2 part time 120 360

Refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

 

 

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1.8 Admissions Officer’s Offices UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities Admissions officers perform department specific tasks, as well as meet with parents. Adjacency Locate off of the Waiting Lobby. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

7 2 160 2,240

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

14 Workstation for officers

4 Task table To meet with parents, or internal collaboration/ work.

28 Chair For officers and for visitors

For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

 

 

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1.9 Interview Rooms UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities

Will be used by both the Admissions and One Stop Students Center. Staff meetings, as well as meeting with parents and other functions. Not for general building use. Adjacency Locate centrally. To be shared with One Stop Center. Does not have to be adjacent to the Waiting Lobby. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

2 1 100 200

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

1 Small table

4-6 Chair

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving (NA) C. Wall display/work surfaces White boards D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting TBD G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Sound rated: >50 STC. I. Audio/visual systems and equipment Provide monitor in each room. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Connection to hook up laptop. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Card access. To be programmed to be used by both departments. L. Finishes or Space characteristics TBD

 

 

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1.10 Student Worker Space UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities

Students have miscellaneous tasks, like compiling give away materials, etc. The Student Workers need to be in an enclosed office. Adjacency

Locate close to Waiting Lobby and Reception. Student worker space needs visual connection to receptions desk to provide back up. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 3 60 180

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

3 Desk or work surface The L shaped work surface does not work well when people bump into each other

3 Chair

3 Computer TBD

For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements. Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes TBD

 

 

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1.11 Break Room/ Vending UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities

Break Room to be used by both the Admissions and One Stop Students Center. Vending located in corridor, to be used by all building visitors. Adjacency Locate centrally. To be shared with One Stop Center. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 – – 200

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

1 Sink with disposal

1 Coffee maker

1 Refrigerator No ice maker required.

1 Microwave

1 ea. Soap and towel dispensers.

TBD Tables

TBD Chairs

TBD Lockers Lockers are needed for staff, with space to hang a coat. A hook on the back is good

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Counter. Cabinets. C. Wall display/work surfaces White board, tac board D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing

Break Room: Sink with disposal Vending: no water connection for coffee or ice vending is required, unless more space is provided for additional vending machines.

F. Electrical service or special lighting TBD G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs TBD I. Audio/visual systems and equipment (NA) No monitor is needed in the Break Room J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Internet connection is required at vending machines for credit payment. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Card access. L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: VCT floor tile. 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 lay-in acoustical ceiling tile. Walls: Painted gypsum board

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: TBD

 

 

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1.12 Service Room UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities

Mail room, copy room. To be used by both the Admissions and One Stop Students Center. Adjacency

To be shared with One-Stop Center. The copy room area should be “hidden” from daily traffic yet central to the entire user population. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 – – 200

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

2 Copier/ printer. Currently have two large printers (copier/printer and printer).

TBD Counters, shelving Use systems furniture in lieu of built-in casework.

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Shelving and/or lockable cabinets. Additional space for recycling storage. C. Wall display/work surfaces TBD D. HVAC or special ventilation needs Per LEED Indoor Air Quality requirements spaces with copy machines shall be enclosed, with negative air pressure provided in the space. E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting This space should be equipped with a dedicated circuit. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs (NA) I. Audio/visual systems and equipment (NA) J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Data connection for printers. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Card access. L. Finishes or Space characteristics Standard Office finishes

 

 

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1.13 Storage UG ADMISSIONS

Description of activities Storage room for marketing materials. Could be shared with One Stop Student Center. Adjacency Locate close to Admissions. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 – – 200

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

TBD Shelving Store large boxes. Printed material and t shirts are high volume items. Water for visitors.

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving TBD C. Wall display/work surfaces (NA) D. HVAC or special ventilation needs (NA) E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting TBD G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs (NA) I. Audio/visual systems and equipment (NA) J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs TBD K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Card access. L. Finishes or Space characteristics Standard Office finishes

 

 

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2.0 General Information ONE STOP STUDENTS CENTER

Department Activities:

The One Stop Students Center provides one-stop-shop location for the student services on campus. The new function is developed to provide fast service and pleasant experiences for the growing number of students. The services will include student accounts, academic advising and counseling, etc.

Operation hours: 9am – 5pm. Department to be locked down after hours. Adjacency:

 The Admissions and the One Stop Students Center shall have separate and clearly distinguished entrances. NO shared lobby. Need to keep One Stop Center and angry/ frustrated students as far away from the Admissions entrance as possible.

 Admissions and One Stop to share: Training Room, Conference Room, Interview Rooms, Service Room and Storage.

 Provide separate entrance to the OSS Center. Provide access from the main building entrance and lobby.

General Comments:

The supports staff for the whole department is to remain at the existing location. The detailed functions for the space are currently under development.

 

 

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2.1 Reception Area ONE STOP STUDENTS CENTER

Description of activities

Student’s visit is to start at the Reception. Type of service will depend on an enquiry. The options provided are: self-serve kiosks, service at the reception counter, or a meeting with an advisor. Space layout should take into consideration provisions for queuing. The peak time for heavy traffic is the Fall Semester. It is possible a mobile queuing system and card swipe could be used outside to help alleviate the heavy traffic inside.

The exact type of ticketing system that will be used to notify students of upcoming appointments is not yet known. It will be through the internet and ticketing/ queuing dedicated monitors will be needed to alert students. Additional monitors to be located in the main building lobby. Adjacency Reception needs to be located directly in front of the center entrance. Provide separate entrance to the OSS Center. Provide access from the main building entrance and lobby. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 20 30 600

1 3 60 180 – Reception Desk

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

3 Chair

3 Computers

1 Small printer A small printer is needed for the workers

1 Printer and scanner Provide a printer and scanner possibly located on other side of the Reception back wall.

1 Recycling station

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Casework Counter C. Wall display/work surfaces TBD D. HVAC or special ventilation needs Per LEED Indoor Air Quality requirements spaces with copy machines shall be enclosed, with negative air pressure provided in the space. E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting Feature lighting at the Reception. Power for printers. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs TBD I. Audio/visual systems and equipment Ticketing system TBD. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Computers at Reception counter K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Panic button at Reception L. Finishes or Space characteristics TBD

 

 

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2.2 Waiting Area Lounge ONE STOP STUDENTS CENTER

Description of activities Area for the students waiting for an appointment with advisors. Computer Kiosks to be provided for students to complete their registration on-line if they haven’t done so. Adjacency Provide access to the Main building lobby: soft seating at the main lobby can be used as overflow for the One Stop. Provide a ticketing/ queuing monitor for the One Stop Center. Noisy areas and soft seating should be located near the OSS Center entry. Locate as far away as possible from the Admissions Lobby. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 100 25 2,500

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

TBD Soft seating

4 Kiosks Standup check-in stations/ kiosks (4) can be built as a counter, with dividers for student’s privacy.

4 Computers at kiosks

1 Small printer Provide additional printer for students in the area.

TBD Exterior seating Make provisions for outside furniture.

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving TBD C. Wall display/work surfaces TBD D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting TBD G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs TBD I. Audio/visual systems and equipment Information monitor. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Wireless internet service for student’s use. Computers at kiosks. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics TBD

 

 

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2.3 Advisor’s Area ONE STOP STUDENTS CENTER

Description of activities

Large open space for student advising stations (pods). The staff rotates between working out front with students and working in the offices. One Stop advising stations to be located together in a regular pattern in a more quiet location. Each advising station needs to be numbered for students to be able to see where to go.

The space has to stay flexible. The stations (pods) need to be constantly re-arranged and reconfigured depending on student traffic. No provisions for phone sets needed at the advising stations. NAU is changing the systems to headsets and calls over computers/ internet. Adjacency Locate behind the Reception area. Direct access and visual connection to: Director Office, Associate Director Office, Staff Support office and Counseling Officers Offices. Provide easy accessible printer and copier in the area. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

5-8 1 120 960

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

8 Pods Stations need to be sturdy, but flexible. A cup holder beneath the desk would be nice.

Provide storage space. Storage with seats on top is a good option because sometimes whole families meet with advisors.

8 Computers Monitors to have an option to be rotated to face a student if needed.

TBD Chairs

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Storage is needed for additional chairs in the area. C. Wall display/work surfaces TBD D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting Provide flexibility for rearranging the pods. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Provide quiet working environment. I. Audio/visual systems and equipment TBD .Sound masking system. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Stations shall have power and data connection, wireless service is not acceptable. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Card access to the open area from the rest of the building. L. Finishes or Space characteristics TBD

 

 

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2.4 Counseling Officers Offices ONE STOP STUDENTS CENTER

Description of activities

The staff rotates between working out front with students and working in the offices. These offices need to be very quiet. Adjacency Locate directly off of Lobby and One Stop Advising stations area. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

5 1 120 600

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

3 Scanner Each office will need a scanner.

 

K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Panic button in each office. Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes Windows are needed in offices for visual contact with the One Stop floor For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

 

 

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2.5 Director Office ONE STOP STUDENTS CENTER

Description of activities Adjacency Locate directly off of One Stop Advising stations area. Locate close to Staff Support Office. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 1 160 160

K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Panic button. Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes Windows are needed in offices for visual contact with the One Stop floor For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

2.6 Associate Director Office ONE STOP STUDENTS CENTER

Description of activities Adjacency Locate directly off of One Stop Advising stations area. Locate next to Staff Support Office and Student Worker Space. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 1 160 160

K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Panic button. Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes Windows are needed in offices for visual contact with the One Stop floor For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

 

 

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2.7 Staff Support Office/ Vault ONE STOP STUDENTS CENTER

Description of activities Adjacency Locate directly off of One Stop Advising stations area. Locate next to Associate Director’s office. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 1 120+ vault 140

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

1 Vault A safe or vault with a drop box is needed in the Staff Support Office for cash deposits.

K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Panic button. Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes Windows are needed in offices for visual contact with the One Stop floor For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

2.9 Student Worker Space ONE STOP STUDENTS CENTER

Description of activities There needs to be space for 6-8 student workers to work (part time), they can work in one room together. Adjacency Locate next to Associate Director’s office. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 3 60 180

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

3 Desk or work surface The L shaped work surface does not work well when people bump into each other

3 Chair

3 Computer TBD

For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

 

 

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2.9 Training Room ONE STOP STUDENTS CENTER

Description of activities Staff training. Adjacency To be shared between the Admissions and the One Stop Student Center. Locate centrally. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 36 35 1,050

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

36 Computers

TBD Tables and chairs

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving TBD C. Wall display/work surfaces White board whiteboards are needed. D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting Power for computers. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Sound rated: >50 STC. I. Audio/visual systems and equipment

Overhead projector, projection screen. smart board. Provisions for video conferencing, webinars.

J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Hardwiring is required here because wireless has not been dependable. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Card access. To be programmed to be used by both departments. L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: Carpet tile, 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 acoustical ceiling tile. Minimum ceiling height is 10 feet. Walls: Painted gypsum board walls. One accent wall.

 

 

 

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3.0 General Information MATH CENTER

Department Activities:

The existing Lumberjack Mathematics Center is being relocated to new facility. In addition to Math Emporium, the new space is to house three large classrooms, testing lab, tutoring spaces, satellite offices for the staff and lounges for the staff and the tutors. The existing center currently serves 3300 students and will serve more in the new space as a new course will be joining the LMC.

Operation hours 7am – 9 pm. The Main Center is to be locked after hours. South Stair to be emergency exit only, but to have card access for faculty/staff for entry/exit. Adjacency:

Locate all of the functions on one floor. General Comments:

 Math Dept. estimated the total part time staff at 40-50 people

 Provide soft seating for students in interstitial spaces.

 Provide writing wall surfaces everywhere, frosted glass walls could be used as white boards.

 In addition to the code required plumbing provide extra plumbing fixtures to serve the large number of students. Math Dept. preferred that the Gender Neutral restroom not be located on the 2nd floor.

 General feel of openness (glass) is desired between the Main Center, the Tutorial Rooms and the Testing Lab.

 The existing spaces are too bland, would like to introduce more color into the new classrooms and spaces in general.

General computer, data and AV equipment:

 Provide wireless internet access throughout.

 Provide outlets everywhere, in addition USB ports discussed as favorable.

 Projecting on white board is preferable to screens.

 If feasible, provide smart boards throughout.

 Department need rack space for small UPS in the IDF room. Since they are not mission critical or have ANY data on them reducing the distance to the client (the thin clients in the large room) would

be beneficial. However Math Department could house them in their new racks in the co‐location room as a second option if it was deemed inappropriate.

 The existing or new furniture must support the following desktop computers: Testing Lab: it is the intention to move the 50+ current systems which are Dell OptiPlex 9020 All-In- Ones. These have dimensions of 15.2 x 22.6 x 2.7 and weigh 17 lbs. In the future may go to use Dell Wyse D10D thin client with separate monitor 14.24 x 21.98 x 2.56 and weight of 8.73 lbs. Main Center: will probably go with Dell Wyse D10D thin client and monitor 14.24 x 21.98 x 2.56 and weight of 8.73 lbs. The Wyse thin clients to be placed on the back part of the work surface adjacent to monitor.

 

 

 

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3.1 Main Center MATH CENTER

Description of activities

The Main Math Center provides resources and individual instructions for self-studying. It is a large open space with 245 computers (computer count is based on 210 students from the three (70 count) classrooms, plus 35 additional spaces).

There will be 3 tutors in the Main Center at all times. LMC is looking at developing an App (Wi-Fi or LCD displays) which will allow tutors to see which table needs help.

Existing tables are being relocated to the Main Math Center and to the Testing Lab. The Main Center space is to be designed with provisions for future replacement of the furniture with different size and shape tables. Adjacency Math Center, Tutorial rooms, and Computer Testing Lab all require check-in, and need to be located close to the Check-in counter. It is Ok for visitors to see what’s happening in the Main Math Center, but the space should be separated by a glass wall to provide quiet environment for students. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 245 35 8,575

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

Tables Reuse existing tables. Provide additional tables to get to the 245 count.

245+ Chairs Provide new chairs.

1 Printer for student use

Locate at the Help Desk

TBD Soft seating Provide lounge type seating within the Emporium.

NOTE: The existing computers and the monitors will be replaced by the time the Math Emporium is built. The existing monitor support arms are not secure and the same system will not be used again. Need to have ability to lower the monitors for the flexibility of the teaching options. B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Provide storage for computer parts in the close proximity to the center. C. Wall display/work surfaces Mobile white boards. Writing wall surfaces. D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting. Provide flexible outlets layout so the furniture could be easily configured.

 

 

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G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Provide quiet environment for students. Need provisions for sound control when several groups are working in the same large open space. I. Audio/visual systems and equipment

Provide monitors for group study. Can be located on the columns. Messaging/ display system for tutors to see what table need help. Sound masking system. Wireless systems.

J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs 245 computers. Provide flexible outlets layout so the furniture could be easily configured. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Limit student and visitor access to the Math Center after hours. Public areas can be accessible. L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: Carpet tile, 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: TBD Walls: Painted gypsum board. Additional features TBD.

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: 245 computers to be clustered in groups of 35, so several classes could be given at the same time. The spaces should be separated, but not with hard surfaces. Math Department likes the idea of separating the space with color in chairs or carpet tiles.

 

 

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3.2 Main Center Reception/ Help Desk MATH CENTER

Description of activities

Check-in counter to be located at the entrance. It will be staffed with one person to take student ID’s and to check students into the Testing Lab.

In addition to roving helpers/ tutors need to have a Help Center. Help Center is a space where students go for human help; triage place where students can go to request help, receive information on what’s happening in the center that day, schedule rooms, etc. Could be located at the back of the Check- in counter. It should be located in a prominent location and be clearly marked. Adjacency Check-in counter to be a control point for the Math Emporium, the Testing Lab, and the Tutorial breakout rooms. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 2-3 600

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

TBD Chairs

1 Small printer Printer/ copier for staff and students. A space off a corridor with printer/ copier could be ok.

2-3 Check-in computers

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Casework counter. Provide multiple storage configurations at the counter for: iPad storage, printer, filing. Incorporate dedicated mail boxes/ cubbies for tutors. Don’t have to be secure. Enough space to put in a tee-shirt, markers and such. C. Wall display/work surfaces TBD D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting Computers. Floor outlets. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs (NA) I. Audio/visual systems and equipment LMC is looking at developing an App (Wi-Fi or LCD displays) which will allow tutors to see which table needs help. Information monitor(s). J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs 2-3 computers, small printer. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Turnstiles (card activated) to be a control point for the Math Center proper, the testing lab, and the Tutorial breakout rooms, Check-in counter to monitor. Provide an option to lock the center after hours. L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: Carpet tile, 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: TBD Walls: Painted gypsum board. Additional features TBD.

 

 

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3.3 Computer Testing Lab MATH CENTER

Description of activities Testing Center for the Department. Adjacency Students will check in at the main Check-in desk. Accessible from the Main Math Center. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 50 35 1,750

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

Computer tables Testing furniture will remain as it was only recently purchased.

TBD Chairs Provide new chairs.

1 Proctor table To be located at the entrance.

TBD Cubbies/coat check Provide “cubbies” in Testing Lab for student backpacks etc.

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Provide plenty of space for storage. C. Wall display/work surfaces White boards, tack boards. Min. vertical writing surface per room is 64 SF (4×16); normal is 80 SF (4×20). White boards to have a continuous tray at the base for markers and erasers; and a top 1″ cork strip. NOTE: The painted white boards in the classrooms ware off fast. The mountable boards are preferred, in addition they are magnetic and can be used to put-up materials. D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting Power and data to computers. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Sound rated: >60 STC. I. Audio/visual systems and equipment Testing lab to have a screen (or suitable wall for projection) and a projector (small portable projectors were discussed as a possibility) for training purposes. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs LMC is planning to develop/ revise existing software to allow for proctor to log into any computer from their table, and enter a password for separate exams. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: Carpet tile, 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 lay-in acoustical ceiling tile. High NRC rating. Minimum ceiling height is 10 feet. Walls: Painted gypsum board

 

 

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3.4 Tutorial/Breakout Rooms MATH CENTER

Description of activities

More informal than classrooms. Used for 15 minutes mini lessons for specific focused subjects. Requires check-in, scheduling for use. One large room to be subdivided into a small room and a medium size room. One side to be set up with tables joined for large conference table other side to be set as typical lecture class with tables & chairs. Adjacency

Locate directly off the Math Center, close to the Check-In counter. Controlled access. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 – – 600

1 – – 300

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

TBD “Skinny” tables 20” deep.

If we have skinny tables and chairs rooms we’ll have to flexibility to set this up how we want it.

TBD Chairs

2 Tutorial rooms to have at least one computer each.

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving C. Wall display/work surfaces White boards D. HVAC or special ventilation needs (NA) E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting TBD G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Sound rated: >50 STC. I. Audio/visual systems and equipment Wall mounted projector/screen at one end of each room. One lectern at each end of large class or at least lap tops. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Place and power for lap top or computer in each subdivided space. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: Carpet tile, 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 lay-in acoustical ceiling tile. High NRC rating. Minimum ceiling height is 10 feet. Walls: Painted gypsum board. Moveable partition to divide into 2 rooms (52 STC rating)

 

 

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3.5 Classrooms MATH CENTER

Description of activities

The department is working towards of providing an instructor interaction type classes and looking for a smaller and more mobile teacher station to discourage a lecture type teaching with tutor “hiding” behind a desk. The idea is flexibility in the classrooms: being able to move the tables in chairs in different arrangements, using a laptop to connect to the projector wireless, etc. Adjacency

Classrooms are to be located together and off of the main lobby, not behind the check-in desk. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

3 72 35 7,350

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

TBD 20 in. deep tables

Need enough space for students to spread study materials.

73 Chairs

TBD Mobile whiteboards

1 Teacher table

3 Pad Cam Pad cam size: 20”L x 15”W x 7.5”H

3 Mobile AV carts

3 Mobile smart boards

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Provide plenty of space for storage in the classrooms. Lockable storage for equipment and misc. (laptop, calculators, etc.) C. Wall display/work surfaces White boards, tack boards. Min. vertical writing surface per room is 64 SF (4×16); normal is 80 SF (4×20). White boards to have a continuous tray at the base for markers and erasers; and a top 1″ cork strip. NOTE: The painted white boards in the classrooms ware off fast. The mountable boards are preferred, in addition they are magnetic and can be used to put-up materials. C. Wall display/work surfaces White boards D. HVAC or special ventilation needs (NA) E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting TBD G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Sound rated: >50 STC. Square classrooms are preferred for voice projection.

 

 

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I. Audio/visual systems and equipment Classrooms to have speakers, screen, projector (small portable projectors were discussed as a possibility) or smart boards, and pad cam. “Crestron” system is not needed. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Laptop or computer connections for teachers. Wireless internet access. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: Carpet tile, 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 acoustical ceiling tile. Minimum ceiling height is 10 feet. Walls: Painted gypsum board walls. One accent wall.

 

 

 

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3.6 Student Study Rooms MATH CENTER

Description of activities Study spaces for general use in the building. Adjacency Do not need to be monitored. Can be located anywhere. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

10 or less – – 1000

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

TBD Moveable tables/chairs

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving (NA) C. Wall display/work surfaces White boards D. HVAC or special ventilation needs (NA) E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting Plenty of outlets. Provide outlets with USB ports. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Variety of spaces from private to more open. I. Audio/visual systems and equipment TBD J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Wireless internet K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: Carpet tile, 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 acoustical ceiling tile. Minimum ceiling height is 10 feet. Walls: Painted gypsum board walls.

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: TBD

 

 

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3.7 Vending MATH CENTER

Description of activities

Some students are in the Math Center for extended periods of time. Provide break-out spaces for students. Don’t need a full café, some place to get a coke and a snack. Adjacency Close to the Main Math Center Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 – – 1000

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

TBD Vending machines

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving TBD C. Wall display/work surfaces TBD D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing Floor sink F. Electrical service or special lighting TBD G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs (NA) I. Audio/visual systems and equipment (NA) J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Internet connection is required at vending machines for credit payment. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: VCT floor tile. 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 lay-in acoustical ceiling tile. Walls: Painted gypsum board

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: TBD

 

 

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3.8 Lounge: Undergraduate Tutors MATH CENTER

Description of activities

Lounge for Undergraduate Tutors. Provide different seating options as the staff works in the lounges. Soft seating together with larger tables to “spread out” and use laptops. Adjacency Locate close to the Main Math Center. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 15 30 450

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

1 Sink with disposal

1 Coffee maker

1 Refrigerator No ice maker required.

1 Microwave

1 ea. Soap and towel dispensers.

TBD Tables

TBD Chairs

TBD Cubbies Secure cubbies, coat storage

2-3 Computers Space for 2 or 3 computers per lounge.

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Counter. Cabinets. Storage for cups, paper ware, print paper, etc. C. Wall display/work surfaces White board, tac board D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing Sink with disposal F. Electrical service or special lighting Provisions for computers G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs TBD I. Audio/visual systems and equipment Monitor J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Internet connection. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Card access. L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: VCT floor tile. 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 lay-in acoustical ceiling tile. Walls: Painted gypsum board

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: TBD

 

 

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3.9 Lounge: Faculty MATH CENTER

Description of activities

Lounge for the Faculty Staff. Provide different seating options as the staff works in the lounges. Soft seating together with larger tables to “spread out” and use laptops. Adjacency Locate close to the Main Math Center and Staff Offices. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 15 30 450

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

1 Sink with disposal

1 Coffee maker

1 Refrigerator No ice maker required.

1 Microwave

1 ea. Soap and towel dispensers.

TBD Tables

TBD Chairs

TBD Soft Seating

TBD Lockers Secure lockers

TBD Mail Boxes Mail boxes for staff

TBD Coat rack.

2-3 Computers Space for 2 or 3 computers per lounge.

1 Printer/copier Copier will be big: make sure there’s enough room!

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Counter. Cabinets. Storage for cups, paper ware, print paper, etc. Provide small storage space adjacent to the lounge. C. Wall display/work surfaces White board, tac board D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing Sink with disposal F. Electrical service or special lighting Provisions for printer, computers. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs TBD I. Audio/visual systems and equipment Monitor. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Internet connection. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Card access. L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: VCT floor tile. 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 lay-in acoustical ceiling tile. Walls: Painted gypsum board

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: TBD

 

 

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3.10 Conference Room MATH CENTER

Description of activities

Will be used for staff purposes only, not shared with students. Adjacency

Preferably located close to the staff area. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 12-15 30 600

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

1 Conference room table. Surface tray with power and data outlets.

20 Chairs

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving TBD C. Wall display/work surfaces White boards. D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting Conference room lighting. Floor power and data box for a conference table. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Sound rated: >50 STC. I. Audio/visual systems and equipment: Provide projector and a screen. Wall mounted projector is an option. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Wireless internet access. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: carpet tile. 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 lay-in acoustical ceiling tile. Walls: Painted gypsum board

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: TBD

 

 

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3.11 Director Office MATH CENTER

Description of activities

Satellite office for the LMC Director. Have separate office in the main math department building. Adjacency

Can be located anywhere but separated from students. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 1 160 160

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

2-3 Side chairs For officers and for visitors

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: TBD For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

3.12 Faculty Offices MATH CENTER

Description of activities

Faculty – (2) 3 person offices. Those are more of satellite stations for staff who will have other offices on campus. Not dedicated and most likely to be used by different staff members at different times. Adjacency Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

2 3 80 480

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

3 ea. Workstation for staff

3 ea. Chair

For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

 

 

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3.13 Staff Offices, Course Coordinator MATH CENTER

Description of activities

Offices for full time staff. As the center grows will need additional office space. Adjacency

Locate close to the Main Math Center. Course Coordinator Office to be adjacent to the Staff Offices. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

2 1 120 240 – Tutor Supervisor, IT

1 1 120 120 – Lab Manager

1 1 120 120 – Course Coordinator

J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs

Lab manager office: 2 Ethernet ports for computer, printer, telephone and fax. IT Staff offices to have 2-3 monitors Multiple Ethernet connections, large computer setup/system, and substantial work surface.

K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

 

 

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3.14 Storage MATH CENTER

Description of activities

Centralized storage for entire Math Center (computer components, furniture components, and misc.) Boxes and misc. debris all over the current math rooms. Adjacency Locate close to Main Math Center. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 – – 200

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

TBD Shelving

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving TBD C. Wall display/work surfaces (NA) D. HVAC or special ventilation needs (NA) E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting TBD G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs (NA) I. Audio/visual systems and equipment (NA) J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs TBD K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other Card access. L. Finishes or Space characteristics Standard Office finishes

 

 

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4.0 General Information ACADEMIC OFFICES

Department Activities:

The project includes faculty office spaces for collegial interactions and facilitation of student access to professors, all within a collaborative learning environment. Four separate departments shall be created, each with separate Chair Office, Staff Support Office, Administrative Office and a Service Room. Potential conversion of part of an office space into an additional fifth smaller department is currently under consideration.

Operation hours: open at all times. Provide after hour security access only, during the day students need to be able to walk into the area freely. Keyed access to individual offices Adjacency:

The Dept. Chairs offices, Support Staff offices, and Administrative Offices (4 total, 1 set per dept.) are to be clustered around a lobby/reception area directly upon exiting the elevators. The staff and administrative office will provide a buffer between the Chair Offices and the Lobby/ Reception area.

(1) Reception desk (likely operated by a student) will suffice for basic department directions. i.e. the person at the reception desk will direct people to the department they are looking for. General Comments:

 Open spaces increase morale! However, private offices are more important as the main focus.

 Bring as much natural light as possible into offices. Strongly supports idea of providing skylights to introduce natural light where possible within eastern interior corridor.

 Secure Bicycle storage was requested at grade, an estimated 20% of faculty would use the bike storage.

 A lockable individual Shower room was requested.

 A Lactation Room was requested.

 

 

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4.1 Chair’s Offices ACADEMIC OFFICES

Description of activities

Department Chairs. Adjacency

The Dept. Chairs Offices, Support Staff Offices, and Administrative Offices (4 total, 1 set per department) are to be clustered around a lobby/reception area directly upon exiting the elevators. Locate Chair’s Office next to and have door to Staff Support Office. Locate close to a Conference Room, Administrative Office, and Service Room. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

4 1 160 640

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

2-3 Side chairs For officers and for visitors

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: Provide ‘frosted’ glass or film in the proposed door sidelines of all faculty offices. For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

 

 

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4.2 Staff Support Offices ACADEMIC OFFICES

Description of activities

Department Staff Support Office. Adjacency

The Dept. Chairs Offices, Support Staff Offices, and Administrative Offices (4 total, 1 set per department) are to be clustered around a lobby/reception area directly upon exiting the elevators. Provide doors to Chair’s Office and the adjacent Administrative reception stations. Consider increasing the size of the staff offices. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

4 1 120 480

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

2-3 Small printer

 

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Departments will typically have records in filing cabinets that must be secure. Preferably in a lockable secure space. Maybe in the storage room? Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: Provide ‘frosted’ glass or film in the proposed door sidelines of all faculty offices. For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

 

 

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4.3 Administrative Offices/ Reception Area ACADEMIC OFFICES

Description of activities

The Admin office will have at least (2) people working at a time (1) admin and (1) student. Station for a third person could be added. Administrative office should be directly off the chair office and allow enough room for a reception area and a couple of chairs for waiting.

Potentially need to add reception and waiting space at the department/ cluster entrances. Possible that only one large reception will be needed for all of the separate departments. Provide a large TV monitor and a wall mounted directory in the central lobby waiting areas. Adjacency

The Dept. Chairs Offices, Support Staff Offices, and Administrative Offices (4 total, 1 set per department) are to be clustered around a lobby/reception area directly upon exiting the elevators. Provide access to Staff Support Office. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

4 2 60 480

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

TBD Filing cabinets extent undefined at this time

 

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Departments will typically have records in filing cabinets that must be secure. Preferably in a lockable secure space. Maybe in the storage room? Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: Provide ‘frosted’ glass or film in the proposed door sidelines of all faculty offices. For other space characteristics refer to Typical Office Space Requirements.

 

 

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4.4 Faculty Offices ACADEMIC OFFICES

Description of activities All of the specified faculty offices shall be enclosed private offices. Need flexible collaborative spaces. Adjacency “Cluster” Offices around 4 chair’s offices Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

156 1 120 18,720

Refer to Typical Office Space Requirements. Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: Provide ‘frosted’ glass or film in the proposed door sidelines of all faculty offices. NOTE: Some faculty will want more file storage than the desk provides and some will want more bookcases. Most will favor an additional bookcase. If there is money and room in the offices, it would be wiser to aim for an extra bookcase than a file cabinet. I don’t suppose there is such a thing as a bookcase unit on top of a two drawer file?

 

 

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4.5 Service Rooms/ Storage ACADEMIC OFFICES

Description of activities

Serve as Department service/mail rooms. The size is to be the same as the offices for later conversion. Department service/mail rooms to house an all-in-one service copier/printer with collator; mail boxes for the associated quantities of faculty offices; paper supply storage and 24” x 36’ minimum counter space adjacent to copier.

Each department needs at least one room for storage. Space permitting, an additional storage room for accommodating paper/office supplies somewhere in the service spline is desirable. Adjacency

There must be access to a workroom with copier, fax, etc. for each department and they cannot be located far from the departments administrative support staff. There must be easy access for faculty to this space without walking through an admin work space Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 1 200 200

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

2 Copier/ printer. Currently have two large printers (copier/printer and printer).

TBD Counters, shelving Use systems furniture in lieu of built-in casework.

TBD Mail boxes.

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Shelving and/or lockable cabinets. Additional space for recycling storage. C. Wall display/work surfaces TBD D. HVAC or special ventilation needs Per LEED Indoor Air Quality requirements spaces with copy machines shall be enclosed, with negative air pressure provided in the space. E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting This space should be equipped with a dedicated circuit. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs (NA) I. Audio/visual systems and equipment (NA) J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Data connection for printers. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics Standard Office finishes

 

 

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4.7 Conference Rooms ACADEMIC OFFICES

Description of activities

Conference rooms of different sizes available for chair/admin support/faculty for meetings. Adjacency Conference rooms should be located relatively close to the Chairs office Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

1 – small 15 23 350

2 – medium 25-30 20 560

1 – large 45-50 20 910

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

3 Conference room table. Surface tray with power and data outlets.

TBD Chairs

3 Sink The countertop sinks shown in the conference rooms should be sized for washing hands & rinsing off utensils only (bar sink). No coffee makers or refrigerators needed.

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Provide large counter space with storage. Pull-out rack at counter for equipment. C. Wall display/work surfaces White boards. D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing Bar sink F. Electrical service or special lighting Conference room lighting. Plenty of power outlets above counter. Floor power and data box for a conference table. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs Sound rated: >50 STC. I. Audio/visual systems and equipment: Screen and projector in Large and Medium rooms. Monitor in Small room. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Wireless internet access. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: carpet tile. 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 lay-in acoustical ceiling tile. Walls: Painted gypsum board, Glass walls.

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: TBD Provide ‘frosted’ glass of film band (approx. 24” to 72” above finish floor) on the glass corridor walls enclosing all conference rooms.

 

 

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4.8 Faculty Lounge/ Kitchenette ACADEMIC OFFICES

Description of activities

Lounges for the Faculty members. Adjacency Possibly one at either end of the building, or one per floor. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

2 20 30 1,200

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

1 ea. Sink with disposal

1 ea. Dishwasher

1 ea. Coffee maker

1 ea. Refrigerator No ice maker required.

1 ea. Microwave

1 ea. Soap and towel dispensers.

TBD Tables

TBD Chairs

TBD Soft Seating

TBD Coat rack.

1 ea. Large monitor Provide a single large TV monitor located for general viewing in the faculty lounges.

TBD Vending If space permits, would prefer to have vending machines for the staff.

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Counter space with storage in cabinets. C. Wall display/work surfaces White board, tac board D. HVAC or special ventilation needs TBD E. Plumbing Sink w/disposal. Dishwasher. Possible floor sink at vending. F. Electrical service or special lighting TBD G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs TBD I. Audio/visual systems and equipment Monitor. J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs Two data ports for visitors, wireless internet access for staff. Plus internet connection for vending. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: VCT floor tile. 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 lay-in acoustical ceiling tile. Walls: Painted gypsum board

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: TBD

 

 

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4.9 Collaboration Spaces/ Nooks ACADEMIC OFFICES

Description of activities

Break-out, collaboration spaces were requested to provide Faculty with areas to meet with each other or students outside of the offices. Adjacency Locate throughout the Faculty floors. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

8 1-10 30 Varies

A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) Quantity Item Description Remarks/Utility Connection Needs

TBD Soft seating

 

B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving (NA) C. Wall display/work surfaces White board, tac board D. HVAC or special ventilation needs (NA) E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting TBD G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs TBD I. Audio/visual systems and equipment TBD J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs USB ports and plenty of outlets. Wireless internet. K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: VCT floor tile. 4 in. rubber base Ceiling: 2×2 lay-in acoustical ceiling tile. Walls: Painted gypsum board

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: TBD

 

 

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5.0 General Information SUPPORT SPACES & UTILITIES

General description of activities/ Adjacency

All of the support and utilities for the building to be located in a “Utility Spline” on the east side of the structure. Support and Utility Spaces for the building include, but not limited to: 1. Restrooms. 2. Custodial Rooms: Janitor Closets, Storage 3. Mechanical Rooms

a. Mechanical Duct Shafts b. Mechanical HX Room c. Glycol Room (for snow melt system)

4. Electrical Rooms/ Closets a. SES b. Electrical Rooms

5. Telecommunication Rooms a. MDF Room b. IDF Rooms

6. Elevators and Elevator Equipment Room 7. Penthouse: Air Handling Units. General security, safety Facility Services use and access only General Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: Sealed concrete. Ceiling: Open to structure above, all surfaces above painted. Walls: Painted gypsum board

 

 

 

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5.1 Restrooms SUPPORT SPACES & UTILITIES

General description of activities/ Adjacency

In addition to the required by code Men’s and Women’s restrooms and drinking fountains on each

floor, the following facilities to be provided:

1. Additional plumbing fixtures on the First and Second floors where large number of visitors is expected.

2. Water bottle refill (hydration) stations to be incorporated into drinking fountains. Hydration stations to be located centrally in the building. No filters are required for the drinking fountains, or hydration stations.

3. One Gender Neutral Restroom on the Ground Floor. NAU stated that “Gender Neutral” is the proper/standard notation for the rooms and should be included on all documentation. The GNA restroom is to be designated as RESTROOM with the universal male symbol, universal female symbol and universal handicap accessible symbol (if applicable).

4. Showers on the Third and Fourth floors for the Faculty Staff 5. Lactation Room, at least one in the building. General Fixtures and Equipment Needs Standard NAU Toilet accessories. The GNA restroom shall include one diaper changing table in addition to standard restroom fixtures/equipment. General Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: Floor tile, sloped to floor drain. Ceiling: Gypsum wall board ceilings, painted. Walls: Wall tile. Painted gypsum board.

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: Toilet compartments to be ceiling hung, typ. (University preference for ease of cleaning). Solid surface counters.

 

 

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5.2 Custodial: Janitor Closets SUPPORT SPACES & UTILITIES

Description of activities

The custodial closets should be planned to function primarily as the workrooms of men and women responsible for cleaning the interior surfaces of the building. There shall be one custodial closet per building floor level, minimum. Adjacency

Locate at the center of each floor, close to elevators and main pedestrian areas. Square shaped closets are most efficient. There shall be no other utilities located in the closet. Openings to pipe chases or mechanical equipment areas should also not be located inside custodian closets. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

4 – – 400

Size should be a minimum of 92 square feet, with an eight foot minimum width. B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving

 Wall mounted mop racks over the sink. Hangers and wall space for dust mops and brooms. Pegs for storage of rotary brushes.

 A minimum of twelve lineal feet of 11″ deep fixed shelving. Shelving to be mounted at five foot height to allow for machine storage underneath.

 A minimum 5’0” x 2’0” clear floor space shall be maintained to accommodate a vacuum unit C. Wall display/work surfaces (NA) D. HVAC or special ventilation needs Adequate ventilation. E. Plumbing:

 A corner located, floor mounted porcelain mop sink (with an 8” curb). Reinforced hot/cold tap with institutional grade hardware mounted not less than 24 inches above a floor type basin.

 Floor drains, all floors sloped to drain at a minimum ¼ inch per foot.

 Reinforced hot and cold water outlets shall be provided with institutional grade hardware and shall be F. Electrical service or special lighting:

 A grounded 20 Amp. duplex outlet in open wall space, not behind shelves, for recharging battery operated equipment. A minimum of three GFI duplex electrical outlets.

 Recessed light fixtures (to allow for clearance of long broom and mop handles) providing 75 foot candles of light.

G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs (NA) I. Audio/visual systems and equipment (NA) J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs (NA) K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: Sealed concrete or epoxy flooring. Ceiling: Open to structure, paint all surfaces above. Walls: Hard surface walls impervious to water.

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: A 36 inches wide door that swings out, not into the room.

 

 

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5.3 Custodial: Storage, Recycling SUPPORT SPACES & UTILITIES

Extra Stock Storage Rooms

Review the closeout requirements for extra stock product and determine the amount of storage space required to accommodate these materials. It is preferred that the room be located on the ground floor and in a secured room. Recycling Areas:

Additional space for collection of recyclable materials adjacent to the source of recyclable waste generation:

 Paper generated by copy machines or in work stations 22″ deep x 24″ wide

 Newspaper generated in common areas 22″ deep x 24″ wide

 Aluminum collection – near vending machines or in kitchen 22″ deep x 12″ wide

 Individual Offices: White and colored paper only 22″ deep x 18″ wide

 White, colored paper and newspaper 22″ deep x 24″ wide

 

 

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5.4 Telecommunication Rooms SUPPORT SPACES & UTILITIES

Description of activities

All buildings shall have at least one (depending on building size, footprint and design possibly more) Telecommunications room per floor. Design should be that Telecommunications rooms are as close to the core of the building as possible. Multiple story buildings should be designed so that Telecommunications rooms are stacked. Adjacency

The space shall be dedicated to Telecommunications equipment and not shared with electrical or any other building system. Equipment not related to the support of telecommunications closet (e.g., piping, ductwork, etc.) shall not be installed in, pass through, or enter the telecommunications room. Area Requested (see Report, Table-1 for areas provided): No. of Units # People SF p/p Total NSF

4 – – 400

Minimum size shall be 10’X10′ with a minimum of 8′ 6″clearance height with no ceiling. A. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment Needs (FFE) (NA) B. Storage, work or counter surface, and storage cabinet or shelving Equipment racks. C. Wall display/work surfaces (NA) D. HVAC or special ventilation needs Room shall be environmentally controlled to maintain operating range of 65°F to 75° F 24/7 (NAU standard). Per NAU Facilities no special ventilation is required for the building MDF and IDF rooms. E. Plumbing (NA) F. Electrical service or special lighting Power requirements are based on individual building design and need approval of NAU/ITS but a minimum of 2 20amp quad convenience outlets are required. Each Telecommunications room shall be equipped with a grounding bus bar connected to the building TGB. Lighting shall be a minimum of 500 lx measured 3ft. above finished floor. G. Communications (bell, alarm, intercom) TBD H. Special acoustical needs (NA) I. Audio/visual systems and equipment (NA) J. Computer, data processing, or communications network needs TBD K. Special security, safety, fire protection, or other TBD L. Finishes or Space characteristics

Floor: VCT floor tile. 4 in. rubber base. Flooring shall be static free, no carpeting. Ceiling: Open to structure, paint all surfaces above. Walls: Painted gypsum board. All walls shall be covered with 3/4″ fire rated A-C plywood painted with white fire retardant paint. Wall finish shall be light in color.

Other special space characteristics, configuration, features or finishes: Entrance door shall be minimum of 36″ opening outward.

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

 

Appendix 3. DRAFT PROGRAM: FURNITURE SCHEDULE

The Draft Furniture Schedule and the Preliminary Layout Plans are provided for general estimating purposes only.

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment

100A MAIN LOBBY C1 Lounge Chair arm rt, w/power KI My Way 6 Handedness to be determined later C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 6 T1 Occasional table KI My Way 3 M1 Trash/Recycle Peter Pepper 1

100B CORRIDOR ‐

100C CORRIDOR C4 Bench Steelcase Ripple long 1

100D CORRIDOR ‐ 101 VESTIBULE 102 WAITING ‐

102A RECEPTION C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 2

102B GLYCOL RM ‐ 103 LOBBY/ PODS SYS 8 One Stop Workstations, powered Steelcase Answer 8 Similar to atttached drawing

C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 8 C16 Guest Chair, arms KI  Grazie 16 T18 Technology table w/power 42″h 1 T19 Technology table w/power 30″h 1 C25 Stool KI  Grazie 6 C18 Stack chair KI  Grazie 4 C1 Lounge Chair arm rt, w/power KI My Way 3 Handedness to be determined later C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 2 C3 Lounge Chair, tablet, w/power KI My Way 5 Handedness to be determined later T1 Occasional table KI My Way 3 C4 Bench Steelcase Ripple long 2 M1 Trash/Recycle Peter Pepper 1

103A COUNS. OFFICER SYS 3 NAU Standard 120 SF L‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1 C16 Guest Chair, arms KI  Grazie 1

103B COUNS. OFFICER SYS 3 NAU Standard 120 SF L‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C16 Guest Chair, arms KI  Grazie 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

Level One

NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

Page 1 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment 103C COUNS. OFFICER SYS 3 NAU Standard 120 SF L‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1

C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C16 Guest Chair, arms KI  Grazie 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

103D STUDENT WORKERS T8 Desk, BBF ped Steelcase  9000 3 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 3

103E STAFF SUPPORT SYS 3 NAU Standard 120 SF L‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

103F ASST DIRECTOR SYS 6 NAU Standards ‐ 160 sf U‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C12 Exec Chair Steelcase Think 1 C13 Guest Chair arms Steelcase Think 1 C14 Guest Chair, no arms Steelcase Think 2 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1 T15 Table 30″ dia Steelcase Akira 1

103G DIRECTOR SYS 6 NAU Standards ‐ 160 sf U‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C12 Exec Chair Steelcase Think 1 C13 Guest Chair arms Steelcase Think 1 C14 Guest Chair, no arms Steelcase Think 2 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1 T15 Table 30″ dia Steelcase Akira 1

105 CONFERENCE ROOM T7 Conference table 240″, w/power 1 C11 Conference chair, swivel, arm Steelcase Think 18

105A CLOSET ‐ 106 TRAINING ROOM T17 Table 24 x 96 w/power Steelcase 12 To match 238A Math Testing

C6 Student chair, armless KI  Grazie 36

107 COORD SYS 3 NAU Standard 120 SF L‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

109 COORD SYS 3 NAU Standard 120 SF L‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

110 SERVICE ROOM SYS 5 Counters and overheads Steelcase  9000 4 Per Drawing, 50 mail slots

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Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment 111 COORD SYS 3 NAU Standard 120 SF L‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1

C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

112 BREAK ROOM T6 Conference table 72″ Steelcase Akira 1 C23 Chair, arms KI  Grazie 6

113 INTERVIEW ROOM T6 Conference table 72″ Steelcase Akira 1 C23 Chair, arms KI  Grazie 6

114 VESTIBULE ‐ 115 INTERVIEW ROOM T6 Conference table 72″ Steelcase Akira 1

C23 Chair, arms KI  Grazie 6

117 RECEPTION C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 2

119 WAITING LOBBY C1 Lounge Chair arm rt, w/power KI My Way 11 C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 11 C24 Lounge Chair arm armless KI My Way 5 T1 Occasional table KI My Way 5 T20 Corner table KI My Way 1 T18 Technology table w/power 42″h 1 T19 Technology table w/power 30″h 1 C25 Stool KI  Grazie 6 C18 Stack chair KI  Grazie 4 C26  Wing Chair Steelcase CH445 4 T21 Occasional table 24″ DIA Steelcase SW 1

119A ADMISSION OFFICERS SYS 7 NAU Standard ‐ 120 SF L‐shape Steelcase  9000 4 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 4 T6 Conference table 72″ Steelcase Akira 1 C23 Chair, arms KI  Grazie 4 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 2

119B ADMISSION OFFICERS SYS 7 NAU Standard ‐ 120 SF L‐shape Steelcase  9000 4 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 4 T6 Conference table 72″ Steelcase Akira 1 C23 Chair, arms KI  Grazie 4 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 2

119C ADMISSION OFFICERS SYS 7 NAU Standard ‐ 120 SF L‐shape Steelcase  9000 4 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 4 T6 Conference table 72″ Steelcase Akira 1 C23 Chair, arms KI  Grazie 4 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 2

Page 3 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment 119D ADMISSION OFFICERS SYS 7 NAU Standard ‐ 120 SF L‐shape Steelcase  9000 2

C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 2 C23 Chair, arms KI  Grazie 4 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1 T11 Dining table, 36″ Steelcase Akira 1

119E ASST DIRECTOR SYS 6 NAU Standards ‐ 160 sf U‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C12 Exec Chair Steelcase Think 1 C13 Guest Chair arms Steelcase Think 1 C14 Guest Chair, no arms Steelcase Think 2 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1 T15 Table 30″ dia Steelcase Akira 1

119F DIRECTOR OFFICE SYS 6 NAU Standards ‐ 160 sf U‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C12 Exec Chair Steelcase Think 1 C13 Guest Chair arms Steelcase Think 1 C14 Guest Chair, no arms Steelcase Think 2 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1 T15 Table 30″ dia Steelcase Akira 1

119G STUDENT WORKERS T17 Desk 30 x 72 with BBF ped Steelcase  9000 3 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 3

120 STORAGE ‐ 121 AUDITORIUM ‐ By Others 121A STORAGE ‐ 122 STORAGE ‐

200A CIRCULATION C1 Lounge Chair arm rt, w/power KI My Way 7 C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 9 C3 Lounge Chair arm Tablet arm KI My Way 6 T1 Occasional table KI My Way 3 T2 Occasional table 24″ dia KI My Way 5

200B CIRCULATION C4 Bench Steelcase Ripple long 2 C5 Bench Steelcase Ripple short 2

200C CIRCULATION ‐ 200D CIRCULATION ‐ 201 CLASSROOM T3 Seminar table 20×84 Steelcase  Runner 25

C6 Student chair, armless KI  Grazie 72 C7 Instructor chair, with arms KI  Grazie 1 T4 Lectern w/power 1 NAU Standard

201A CLOSET ‐

Level Two

Page 4 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment 202 STUDY C8 Lounge chair on casters KI Relax 4

T5 Occasional table 42″ dia Steelcase SW 1 D2 Marker board 12′ Egan Visual 1

204 STUDY C9 Lounge chair on casters Steelcase Jenny round 4 T1 Occasional table KI My Way 1 C10 Bench Steelcase Bouy 2

206 STUDY C9 Lounge chair on casters Steelcase Jenny round 4 T1 Occasional table KI My Way 1 C10 Bench Steelcase Bouy 2 D3 Marker board 6′ Egan Visual 1

208 STUDY C11 Conference chair, swivel, arm Steelcase Think 6 T6 Conference table 72″ Steelcase Akira 1 D2 Marker board 6′ Egan Visual 1

210 STUDY C11 Conference chair, swivel, arm Steelcase Think 6 T6 Conference table 72″ Steelcase Akira 1 D2 Marker board 12′ Egan Visual 1

211 CLASSROOM T3 Seminar table 20×84 Steelcase  Runner 25 C6 Student chair, armless KI  Grazie 70 C7 Instructor chair, with arms KI  Grazie 1 T4 Lectern w/power 1 NAU Standard

211A CLOSET ‐

212 DIRECTOR SYS 1 NAU Standard 160 SF U‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C12 Exec Chair Steelcase Think 1 C13 Guest Chair arms Steelcase Think 2 C14 Guest Chair, no arms Steelcase Think 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1 T15 Table 30″ dia Steelcase Akira 1

214 STUDY C8 Lounge chair on casters KI Relax 4 T5 Occasional table 42″ dia Steelcase SW 1 D2 Marker board 12′ Egan Visual 1

216 CONFERENCE ROOM C11 Conference chair, swivel, arm Steelcase Think 18 T7 Conference table 240″ Steelcase Akira 1

221 CLASSROOM T3 Seminar table 20×84 Steelcase  Runner 25 C6 Student chair, armless Steelcase  Cachet 70 C7 Instructor chair, with arms Steelcase  Cachet 1 T4 Lectern w/power 1 NAU Standard

Page 5 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment 221A CLOSET ‐ 223 STORAGE ‐ 225 FACULTY OFFICE (3) T8 Desk, BBF ped Steelcase  9000 3

C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 3

227 FACULTY OFFICE (3) T8 Desk, BBF ped Steelcase  9000 3 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 3

228 STUDY C8 Lounge chair on casters KI Relax 4 T9 Occasional table 42″ dia Steelcase SW 1 D2 Marker board 12′ Egan Visual 1

229 COURSE COORD SYS 2 NAU Standard 120 SF U‐ Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C16 Guest Chair arms KI  Grazie 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

230 STUDY C8 Lounge chair on casters KI Relax 4 T9 Low Conference, 72l, 24h Steelcase SW Super elip 1 D2 Marker board 12′ Egan Visual 1

231 STORAGE ‐

232 STUDY C8 Lounge chair on casters KI Relax 4 T9 Occasional table 42″ dia Steelcase SW 1 D2 Marker board 12′ Egan Visual 1

233 STAFF   OFFICE SYS 2 NAU Standard 120 SF U‐ Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C16 Guest Chair arms KI  Grazie 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

234 STUDY C8 Lounge chair on casters KI Relax 4 T9 Occasional table 42″ dia Steelcase SW 1 D2 Marker board 12′ Egan Visual 1

235 STAFF   OFFICE SYS 2 NAU Standard 120 SF U‐ Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C16 Guest Chair arms KI  Grazie 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

236 CHECK‐IN/ HELP DESK C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 4

236A TUTORIAL ROOM T10 New tables to match Steelcase Per inventory C6 Student chair, armless KI  Grazie 9

Page 6 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment

236B TUTORIAL ROOM T10 New tables to match Steelcase Per inventory C6 Student chair, armless KI  Grazie 27

237 STAFF   OFFICE SYS 2 NAU Standard 120 SF U‐ Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C16 Guest Chair arms KI  Grazie 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

238 MATH CENTER E1 Existing tables Steelcase  Per inventory T10 New tables to match Steelcase Per inventory C1 Lounge Chair arm rt KI My Way 12 C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 12 C3 Lounge Chair arm Tablet arm KI My Way 10 T1 Occasional table KI My Way 8 T2 Occasional table 24″ dia KI My Way 2 C4 Bench Steelcase Ripple long 2 C6 Task chair on casters KI  Grazie 248

238A TESTING LAB E1 Existing tables Steelcase  16 Per inventory C6 Student chair, armless KI  Grazie 48 C7 Instructor chair, with arms KI  Grazie 1 E2 Existing Lectern 1

240 VENDING ‐

242 FACULTY   LOUNGE T11 Dining table, 36″ Steelcase Akira 3 C18 Stack chair KI  Grazie 12 C19 Swivel chair KI  Grazie 2 T12 Table 24×60 Steelcase Akira 2 T5 Occasional table 42″ dia Steelcase SW 1 T13 End table National Swift 2 C20 Modular arm rt National Swift 1

242 FACULTY   LOUNGE C21 Modular arm lft National Swift 1 C22 Modular armless National Swift 5 D1 Marker/Tack board Egan 1 M1 Trash/Recycle Peter Pepper 1

242A CLOSET ‐

Page 7 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment 244 GRAD ASST LOUNGE T11 Dining table, 36″ Steelcase Akira 3

C18 Stack chair KI  Grazie 12 C19 Swivel chair KI  Grazie 2 T12 Table 24×60 Steelcase Akira 2 T5 Occasional table 42″ dia Steelcase SW 1 T13 End table National Swift 2 C20 Modular arm rt National Swift 1 C21 Modular arm lft National Swift 1 C22 Modular armless National Swift 5 D1 Marker/Tack board Egan 1 M1 Trash/Recycle Peter Pepper 1

300A CIRCULATION ‐ 300B CIRCULATION ‐ 300C CIRCULATION ‐ 300D CIRCULATION ‐ 301 LOBBY C1 Lounge Chair arm rt KI My Way 1

C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 1 C3 Lounge Chair arm Tablet arm KI My Way 2 T2 Occasional table 24″ dia KI My Way 2 C4 Bench Steelcase Ripple long 3

302 CONFERENCE (LG) C11 Conference chair, swivel, arm Steelcase Think 50 T14 Conference table 168″ Steelcase Akira 2

303 OFFICE (FACULTY) SYS 2 NAU Standard 120 SF U‐ Shaped Steelcase  9000 21 Typical for all office except as noted C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 21 C16 Guest Chair arms KI  Grazie 21 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 21 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 21

304 OFFICE (FACULTY) 305 OFFICE (FACULTY) 306 OFFICE (FACULTY) 307 OFFICE (FACULTY) 308 OFFICE (FACULTY) 309 OFFICE (FACULTY) 310 OFFICE (FACULTY) 311 OFFICE (FACULTY) 312 OFFICE (FACULTY) 313 OFFICE (FACULTY) 315 OFFICE (FACULTY)

Level Three

Page 8 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment 316 LOUNGE C1 Lounge Chair arm rt KI My Way 4

C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 4 T1 Occasional table KI My Way 2 T6 Conference table 72″ Steelcase Akira 2 C23 Chair, arms KI  Grazie 12 C19 Swivel chair KI  Grazie 4 T16 Dining table 36″sq Steelcase Akira 2 T12 Table 24×56 Steelcase Akira 4

316A KITCHENETTE M1 Trash/Recycle Peter Pepper 1

316B CLOSET ‐

317 NOOK C5 Bench Steelcase Ripple short 1

319 OFFICE (FACULTY) SYS 2 NAU Standard 120 SF U‐ Shaped Steelcase  9000 55 Typical for all office except as noted C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 55 C16 Guest Chair arms KI  Grazie 55 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 55 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 55

320 OFFICE (FACULTY) 321 OFFICE (FACULTY) 322 OFFICE (FACULTY) 323 OFFICE (FACULTY) 324 OFFICE (FACULTY) 325 OFFICE (FACULTY) 326 OFFICE (FACULTY) 327 OFFICE (FACULTY)

328 SERVICE ROOM SYS 5 Counters and overheads Steelcase  9000 2 Per Drawing, 50 mail slots

329 CHAIR OFFICE SYS 1 NAU Standard 160 SF U‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C12 Exec Chair Steelcase Think 1 C13 Guest Chair arms Steelcase Think 2 C14 Guest Chair, no arms Steelcase Think 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1 T15 Table 30″ dia Steelcase Akira 1

331 STAFF SYS 3 NAU Standard 120 SF L‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

Page 9 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment

333 ADMIN/ SERVICE SYS 4 Administration Steelcase  9000 1 Per Drawing, provide (2) BBF peds,  counters, overheads, tack boards

C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1

334 CONFERENCE (SM) C11 Conference chair, swivel, arm Steelcase Think 12 T14 Conference table 168″ Steelcase Akira 1

335 ADMIN/ SERVICE SYS 4 Administration Steelcase  9000 1 Per Drawing, provide (2) BBF peds,  counters, overheads, tack boards

C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1

337 STAFF SYS 3 NAU Standard 120 SF L‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

338 SERVICE ROOM SYS 5 Counters and overheads Steelcase  9000 2 Per Drawing, 50 mail slots

339 CHAIR OFFICE SYS 1 NAU Standard 160 SF U‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C12 Exec Chair Steelcase Think 1 C13 Guest Chair arms Steelcase Think 2 C14 Guest Chair, no arms Steelcase Think 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1 T15 Table 30″ dia Steelcase Akira 1

340 OFFICE (FACULTY) 341 OFFICE (FACULTY) 342 OFFICE (FACULTY) 343 OFFICE (FACULTY) 344 OFFICE (FACULTY) 345 OFFICE (FACULTY) 346 OFFICE (FACULTY) 347 OFFICE (FACULTY) 348 OFFICE (FACULTY) 349 OFFICE (FACULTY) 350 OFFICE (FACULTY) 351 OFFICE (FACULTY) 352 OFFICE (FACULTY) 353 OFFICE (FACULTY) 354 OFFICE (FACULTY) 355 OFFICE (FACULTY) 356 OFFICE (FACULTY)

Page 10 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment 357 NOOK C1 Lounge Chair arm rt, with power KI My Way 1

C3 Lounge Chair arm Tablet arm, w/power KI My Way 1 T2 Occasional table 24″ dia KI My Way 1

358 NOOK C1 Lounge Chair arm rt, with power KI My Way 1 C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 1 C3 Lounge Chair arm Tablet arm, w/power KI My Way 2 T2 Occasional table 24″ dia KI My Way 2

359 OFFICE (FACULTY) 360 OFFICE (FACULTY) 361 OFFICE (FACULTY) 362 OFFICE (FACULTY) 363 OFFICE (FACULTY) ` 364 OFFICE (FACULTY) 365 OFFICE (FACULTY) 366 OFFICE (FACULTY) 367 OFFICE (FACULTY) 368 OFFICE (FACULTY) 369 OFFICE (FACULTY) 370 OFFICE (FACULTY) 371 OFFICE (FACULTY) 372 NOOK C1 Lounge Chair arm rt, with power KI My Way 1

C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 1 C3 Lounge Chair arm Tablet arm, w/power KI My Way 2 T2 Occasional table 24″ dia KI My Way 2

373 OFFICE (FACULTY) 374 OFFICE (FACULTY) 375 OFFICE (FACULTY) 376 OFFICE (FACULTY) 377 OFFICE (FACULTY) 378 OFFICE (FACULTY) 379 OFFICE (FACULTY) 380 OFFICE (FACULTY) 381 OFFICE (FACULTY) 382 OFFICE (FACULTY) 383 OFFICE (FACULTY) 384 OFFICE (FACULTY) 385 OFFICE (FACULTY) 386 OFFICE (FACULTY) 387 OFFICE (FACULTY) 388 OFFICE (FACULTY) 389 OFFICE (FACULTY) 390 OFFICE (FACULTY) 391 OFFICE (FACULTY) 393 OFFICE (FACULTY) 395 OFFICE (FACULTY) 396 OFFICE (FACULTY)

Page 11 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment 397 OFFICE (FACULTY) 398 OFFICE (FACULTY) 399 OFFICE (FACULTY)

400A CIRCULATION 400B CIRCULATION 400C CIRCULATION 400D CIRCULATION 401 LOBBY C1 Lounge Chair arm rt, w/power KI My Way 1

C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 1 C3 Lounge Chair arm Tablet arm, w/power KI My Way 2 T2 Occasional table 24″ dia KI My Way 2 C4 Bench Steelcase Ripple long 3

402 CONFERENCE  (MD) C11 Conference chair, swivel, arm Steelcase Think 26 T14 Conference table 168″ w/power Steelcase Akira 1

403 OFFICE (FACULTY) SYS 2 NAU Standard 120 SF U‐ Shaped Steelcase  9000 23 Typical for all office except as noted C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 23 C16 Guest Chair arms KI  Grazie 23 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 23 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 23

404 OFFICE (FACULTY) 405 OFFICE (FACULTY) 406 OFFICE (FACULTY) 407 OFFICE (FACULTY) 408 OFFICE (FACULTY) 409 OFFICE (FACULTY) 410 OFFICE (FACULTY) 411 OFFICE (FACULTY) 412 OFFICE (FACULTY) 413 OFFICE (FACULTY) 414 OFFICE (FACULTY) 415 OFFICE (FACULTY)

416 LOUNGE C1 Lounge Chair arm rt KI My Way 4 C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 4 T1 Occasional table KI My Way 2 T6 Conference table 72″ Steelcase Akira 2 C23 Chair, arms KI  Grazie 12 C19 Swivel chair KI  Grazie 4 T16 Dining table 36″sq Steelcase Akira 2 T12 Table 24×56 Steelcase Akira 4

Level Four

Page 12 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment 416A KITCHENETTE M1 Trash/Recycle Peter Pepper 1

416B CLOSET ‐

417 NOOK C5 Bench Steelcase Ripple short 1

419 OFFICE (FACULTY) 420 OFFICE (FACULTY) 421 OFFICE (FACULTY) 422 OFFICE (FACULTY) 423 OFFICE (FACULTY) 424 OFFICE (FACULTY) 425 OFFICE (FACULTY) 426 OFFICE (FACULTY) 427 OFFICE (FACULTY) 428 OFFICE (FACULTY)

429 CHAIR SYS 1 NAU Standard 160 SF U‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C12 Exec Chair Steelcase Think 1 C13 Guest Chair arms Steelcase Think 2 C14 Guest Chair, no arms Steelcase Think 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1 T15 Table 30″ dia Steelcase Akira 1

430 SERVICE SYS 5 Counters and overheads Steelcase  9000 2

431 STAFF SYS 3 NAU Standard 120 SF L‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

433 ADMIN SYS 4 Administration Steelcase  9000 1 Per Drawing, provide (2) BBF peds,  counters, overheads, tack boards

C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1

434 CONFERENCE (MD) C11 Conference chair, swivel, arm Steelcase Think 26 T14 Conference table 168″, w/power Steelcase Akira 1

435 ADMIN SYS 4 Administration Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1

437 STAFF SYS 3 NAU Standard 120 SF L‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1 C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 1 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1

Page 13 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment 439 CHAIR OFFICE SYS 1 NAU Standard 160 SF U‐Shaped Steelcase  9000 1

C12 Exec Chair Steelcase Think 1 C13 Guest Chair arms Steelcase Think 2 C14 Guest Chair, no arms Steelcase Think 1 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 1 T15 Table 30″ dia Steelcase Akira 1

440 SERVICE SYS 5 Counters with mail cubbies Steelcase  9000 2 Provide 90 cubbies

441 OFFICE (FACULTY) SYS 2 NAU Standard 120 SF U‐ Shaped Steelcase  9000 53 Typical for all office except as noted C15 Task chair, arms Steelcase Think 53 C16 Guest Chair arms KI  Grazie 53 C17 Guest Chair, no arms KI  Grazie 53 S1 Lateral file, 4 drw Steelcase 53

442 OFFICE (FACULTY) 443 OFFICE (FACULTY) 444 OFFICE (FACULTY) 445 OFFICE (FACULTY) 446 OFFICE (FACULTY) 447 OFFICE (FACULTY) 448 OFFICE (FACULTY) 449 OFFICE (FACULTY) 450 OFFICE (FACULTY) 451 OFFICE (FACULTY) 452 OFFICE (FACULTY) 453 OFFICE (FACULTY) 454 OFFICE (FACULTY) 455 OFFICE (FACULTY) 456 OFFICE (FACULTY)

457 NOOK C1 Lounge Chair arm rt, w/power KI My Way 1 Handedness to be determined later C3 Lounge Chair arm Tablet arm, w/power KI My Way 1 Handedness to be determined later T2 Occasional table 24″ dia KI My Way 1

458 NOOK C1 Lounge Chair arm rt, w/power KI My Way 1 C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 1 C3 Lounge Chair arm Tablet arm, w/power KI My Way 2 T2 Occasional table 24″ dia KI My Way 2

459 OFFICE (FACULTY) 460 OFFICE (FACULTY) 461 OFFICE (FACULTY) 462 OFFICE (FACULTY) 463 OFFICE (FACULTY) 464 OFFICE (FACULTY)

Page 14 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

Room No. Name Item No. Description Manufacturer Series Model no. Qty. Comment 465 OFFICE (FACULTY) 466 OFFICE (FACULTY) 467 OFFICE (FACULTY) 468 OFFICE (FACULTY) 469 OFFICE (FACULTY) 470 OFFICE (FACULTY) 471 OFFICE (FACULTY) 472 NOOK C1 Lounge Chair arm rt, w/power KI My Way 1 Handedness to be determined later

C2 Lounge Chair arm lt KI My Way 1 C3 Lounge Chair arm Tablet arm, w/power KI My Way 2 Handedness to be determined later T2 Occasional table 24″ dia KI My Way 2 C4 Bench Steelcase Ripple long 2

473 OFFICE (FACULTY) 474 OFFICE (FACULTY) 475 OFFICE (FACULTY) 476 OFFICE (FACULTY) 477 OFFICE (FACULTY) 478 OFFICE (FACULTY) 479 OFFICE (FACULTY) 480 OFFICE (FACULTY) 481 OFFICE (FACULTY) 482 OFFICE (FACULTY) 483 OFFICE (FACULTY) 484 OFFICE (FACULTY) 485 OFFICE (FACULTY) 486 OFFICE (FACULTY) 487 OFFICE (FACULTY) 488 OFFICE (FACULTY) 489 OFFICE (FACULTY) 490 OFFICE (FACULTY) 491 OFFICE (FACULTY) 493 OFFICE (FACULTY) 495 OFFICE (FACULTY) 497 OFFICE (FACULTY) 498 OFFICE (FACULTY) 499 OFFICE (FACULTY)

Page 15 of 15 NAU SAS BUILDING ‐ SCHEMATIC DESIGN FURNTURE SCHEDULE ‐ 4‐21‐14

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

 

Appendix 4. DETAILED LEED SCORECARD – SCHEMATIC DESIGN

 

 

LEED WORKSHEET – NC 2009 V3- PRELIMINARY – ALL ITEMS TO BE DISCUSSED WITH OWNER

NAU Student and Academic Services Building 4/21/2014 O = Owner CON = Contractor

MPE = Mech/Plumb/ElecA = Architectural S = Structural

Discipline Yes Maybe No Avail. Prerequisite/ Credit Title Comments – SD Submittal

16 6 4 26

C/CON Y SS Prereq 1 Construction Activity Pollution Prevention Civil: A SWPPP will be included in the civil plans. The SWPPP will be included with the final construction documents

A 1 1 SS Credit 1 Site Selection Will comply.

A 3 2 5 SS Credit 2 Development Density & Community Connectivity Will comply.

1 1 SS Credit 3 Brownfield Redevelopment NA

A 6 6 SS Credit 4.1 Alternative Transportation (Public Transportation access) Will comply.

A 1 1 SS Credit 4.2 Alternative Transportation (bicycle storage and changing rooms) Will comply.

MPE/ A Two showers will be provided in the building. Bike and skateboard racks will be provided.

O/ A 3 3 SS Credit 4.3 Alternative Transportation (low emitting & fuel efficient vehicles) Elec: If we pursue this point, we would need to know so electrical charging stations can be provided as needed.

C 2 2 SS Credit 4.4 Alternative Transportation (parking capacity) Civil: Parking is not included in the project.

C 1 1 SS Credit 5.1 Site Development (protect or restore habitat) NA

L/CON/A 1 1 SS Credit 5.2 Site Development (maximize open space) NA

C/A 1 1 SS Credit 6.1 Storm Water Design (quantity control)

C 1 1 SS Credit 6.2 Storm Water Management (treatment/quality control)

C/ A 1 1 SS Credit 7.1 Heat Island Effect (non roof) The proposed building covers most of the site. Covered plaza on the south side of site represents magority of all hardscape. Will most likely comply.

A 1 1 SS Credit 7.2 Heat Island Effect (roof) Will comply.

MPE 1 1 SS Credit 8.0 Light Pollution Reduction Elec: With the builidng on the property line, it will be extremly difficult to meet zero light trespass. This applies to both interior as well as exterior lighting systems.

Will comply with the City of Flagstaff Dark Sky Ordinance

Sustainable Sites

Certified = 40-49 Points Silver = 50-59 Points Gold = 60-79 Points Platinum = 80+ PointsC = Civil/ Landscape

Civil: retention of the first flush (1″ of rainfall) will be provided on site per NAU draiange requirements. This can be applied to both 6.1 and 6.2. Stormwater detetnion will also be provided with underground pipes.

Page 1 of 6

 

 

LEED WORKSHEET – NC 2009 V3- PRELIMINARY – ALL ITEMS TO BE DISCUSSED WITH OWNER

NAU Student and Academic Services Building 4/21/2014 O = Owner CON = Contractor

MPE = Mech/Plumb/ElecA = Architectural S = Structural

Discipline Yes Maybe No Avail. Prerequisite/ Credit Title Comments – SD Submittal

Certified = 40-49 Points Silver = 50-59 Points Gold = 60-79 Points Platinum = 80+ PointsC = Civil/ Landscape

7 3 0 10

MPE/ C Y WE Prereq 1 Water Use Reduction, 20% Reduction Mech: A reclaimed water line has been provided to the building for toilet and urinal flushing. Low flow fixtures as required by NAU are being provided to meet this prerequisite. Civil: A reclaimed line will be extended to service the building.

L/C 2 2 WE Credit 1.1 Water Efficient Landscaping (reduced by 50%) Civil: Landscaping includes replacing the existing trees in the parkway adjacent to the road. Low water use plantings can be incorporated.

MPE/C/L 2 2 WE Credit 1.2 Water Efficient Landscaping (no potable water use or irrigation) Civil: Irrigation for landscaping will be with reclaimed water.

MPE/ C 2 2 WE Credit 2 Innovative Wastewater Technologies Mech: A reclaimed water line has been provided to the building for toilet and urinal flushing. Low flow fixtures as required by NAU are being provided, and we are still striving to achieve this credit.

MPE 3 1 4 WE Credit 3 Water Use Reduction (30%, 35%, 40 % reduction 1 pt each) Mech: Low flow fixtures as required by NAU are being provided, and we are still striving to achieve this credit.

Water Efficiency

Page 2 of 6

 

 

LEED WORKSHEET – NC 2009 V3- PRELIMINARY – ALL ITEMS TO BE DISCUSSED WITH OWNER

NAU Student and Academic Services Building 4/21/2014 O = Owner CON = Contractor

MPE = Mech/Plumb/ElecA = Architectural S = Structural

Discipline Yes Maybe No Avail. Prerequisite/ Credit Title Comments – SD Submittal

Certified = 40-49 Points Silver = 50-59 Points Gold = 60-79 Points Platinum = 80+ PointsC = Civil/ Landscape

15 6 14 35

? Y EA Prerequisite 1 Fundamental Commissioning of the Building Energy System Will review commissioning requirements for the project and schedule impact. Third party commissioning agent would have to be involved.

MPE Y EA Prerequisite 2 Minimum Energy Performance (10% new buildings) Will comply.

MPE Y EA Prerequisite 3 Fundamental Refrigerant Management Mech: At this point, we are not planning on including any new systems with refrigerants. We will need to know the refrigerants used in the existing central plant serving this building to determine if this can be achieved.

MPE/A/O 12 7 19 EA Credit 1 Optimize Energy Performance (1-19 points: 12%, 14%, 16%, 18%, 20%, 22%, 24%, 26%, 28%, 30%, 32%, 34%, 36%, 38%, 40%, 42%, 44%, 46%, 48%)

Elec: At this point we are intending to use LED lighting to reduce lighting loads as part of this LEED point unless directed otherwise. Use of LED Lighting may increase construction costs, but it is critical to the energy savings required.

Mech: Due to the use of the central chiller and steam plants, optimizing the efficiency of the mechanical systems is very limited. To perform the initial energy model, NAU will be providing the design team with a $/BTU rate of the central plant for both chilled water and steam. The building envelope will be critical in achieving these credits and will be determined after further energy model development. We feel that based on previous experience, that getting 12 points in this category is going to be extremely difficult without an on-site source of renewable energy.

MPE/ CON/O 7 7 EA Credit 2

On-Site Renewable Energy (1-7 points: 1%, 3%, 5%, 7%, 9%, 11%, 13%)

Roof structure will be designed with a provision to support future installation of solar panels.

Elec: At this point we are not planning to provide a PV system per the direction of NAU. However, it may be necessary to gain the required LEED points for LEED Silver Certification. If it is determined that a PV system is needed, it will increase construction costs considerably. Additionally, the impact on the building envelope will need to be taken into account.

? 2 2 EA Credit 3 Enhanced Commissioning Will review commissioning requirements for the project and schedule impact.

MPE 2 2 EA Credit 4 Enhanced Refrigerant Management Mech: At this point, we are not planning on including any new systems with refrigerants. We will need to know the refrigerants used in the existing central plant serving this building to determine if this can be achieved.

MPE 3 3 EA Credit 5 Measurement and Verification Elec: At this point we are intending to provide submetering on panelboards within the buildng to monitor loads.

Mech: Chilled water and steam BTU meters are being provided to achieve this credit.

MPE 2 2 EA Credit 6 Green Power Elec: If we pursue this point, discussion with NAU (power distribution by NAU) is required to determine if the purchase of renewable power for 35% of the building’s load, is practical.

Energy and Atmosphere

Page 3 of 6

 

 

LEED WORKSHEET – NC 2009 V3- PRELIMINARY – ALL ITEMS TO BE DISCUSSED WITH OWNER

NAU Student and Academic Services Building 4/21/2014 O = Owner CON = Contractor

MPE = Mech/Plumb/ElecA = Architectural S = Structural

Discipline Yes Maybe No Avail. Prerequisite/ Credit Title Comments – SD Submittal

Certified = 40-49 Points Silver = 50-59 Points Gold = 60-79 Points Platinum = 80+ PointsC = Civil/ Landscape

4 4 6 14

A Y MR Prerequisite 1 Storage and Collection of Recyclables Will comply.

S 1 1 MR Credit 1.1 Building Reuse: Maintain 55% NA

1 1 MR Credit 1.2 Building Reuse: Maintain 75% NA

1 1 MR Credit 1.3 Building Reuse: Maintain 95% NA

1 1 MR Credit 1.4 Building Reuse (maintain 50% of interior non structural elements) NA

CON 1 1 MR Credit 2.1 Construction Waste Management (divert 50% from disposal) Will comply.

CON 1 1 MR Credit 2.2 Construction Waste Management (divert 75% from disposal)

CON 1 1 MR Credit 3.1 Material Reuse 5% NA

CON 1 1 MR Credit 3.2 Material Reuse 10% NA

A/I/CON 1 1 MR Credit 4.1 Recycled Content 10% (post-consumer + 1/2 pre consumer) Will comply.

A/CON 1 1 MR Credit 4.2 Recycled Content 20% (post-consumer + 1/2 pre consumer)

CON/A 1 1 MR Credit 5.1 Regional Materials (10% extracted, processed and manufactured & final assembly regionally) Will comply.

CON/A 1 1 MR Credit 5.2 Regional Materials (20% extracted, processed and manufactured & final assembly regionally)

A/I 1 1 MR Credit 6 Rapidly Renewable Materials

A 1 1 MR Credit 7 Certified Wood Will comply.

Materials and Resources

Page 4 of 6

 

 

LEED WORKSHEET – NC 2009 V3- PRELIMINARY – ALL ITEMS TO BE DISCUSSED WITH OWNER

NAU Student and Academic Services Building 4/21/2014 O = Owner CON = Contractor

MPE = Mech/Plumb/ElecA = Architectural S = Structural

Discipline Yes Maybe No Avail. Prerequisite/ Credit Title Comments – SD Submittal

Certified = 40-49 Points Silver = 50-59 Points Gold = 60-79 Points Platinum = 80+ PointsC = Civil/ Landscape

12 1 2 15

MPE Y IEQ Prerequisite 1 Minimum (IAQ) Indoor Air Quality Performance Will comply.

O/A Y IEQ Prerequisite 2 Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control Will comply.

MPE 1 1 IEQ Credit 1 Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring Mech – Outside air monitoring is being provided at the air handling units and CO2 sensors are being provided in all densely occupied spaces.

MPE 1 1 IEQ Credit 2 Increased Ventilation LSW – Mech – During our initial load calculations, we have provided 30% more outside air than is required by ASHRAE 62.1 in order to meet this credit.

CON/MPE 1 1 IEQ Credit 3.1 Construction IAQ Management Plan (during construction) Will comply.

CON/ O/ MPE 1 1 IEQ Credit 3.2 Construction IAQ Management Plan (before occupancy) Review schedule implication.

A 1 1 IEQ Credit 4.1 Low-Emitting Materials (adhesives and sealants) Will comply.

A 1 1 IEQ Credit 4.2 Low-Emitting Materials (paints and coatings) Will comply.

A 1 1 IEQ Credit 4.3 Low-Emitting Materials (flooring systems) Will comply.

A 1 1 IEQ Credit 4.4 Low-Emitting Materials (composite wood and agrifiber products) Will comply.

A/OWN 1 1 IEQ Credit 5 Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control Mech: Janitor’s closets will be provided with exhaust to meet this requirement.

Will comply.

MPE/ A 1 1 IEQ Credit 6.1 Controllability of Systems (lighting) Elec: At this poing we intend to provide lighting controls ina ccordance with the IECC.

MPE/ A 1 1 IEQ Credit 6.2 Controllability of Systems (thermal comfort) Mech: This requires a minimum of one VAV box for every two offices. We are planning on providing these boxes in order to achieve this credit.

MPE 1 1 IEQ Credit 7.1 Thermal Comfort (Design) Mech: We are intending for the mechanical systems to meet this criteria.

O 1 1 IEQ Credit 7.2 Thermal Comfort Verification Will comply.

A 1 1 IEQ Credit 8.1 Daylight & Views (daylight 75% of spaces) Due to reduces frontage of the building it may not be possible to achieve 75%. The design intent is to provide maximum daylight and views possible.

A 1 1 IEQ Credit 8.2 Daylight and Views (views 90% of spaces) Elec: Increased daylighting will have an impact on HVAC loads and will require additional lighting control per the IECC.

Indoor Environmental Quality

Page 5 of 6

 

 

LEED WORKSHEET – NC 2009 V3- PRELIMINARY – ALL ITEMS TO BE DISCUSSED WITH OWNER

NAU Student and Academic Services Building 4/21/2014 O = Owner CON = Contractor

MPE = Mech/Plumb/ElecA = Architectural S = Structural

Discipline Yes Maybe No Avail. Prerequisite/ Credit Title Comments – SD Submittal

Certified = 40-49 Points Silver = 50-59 Points Gold = 60-79 Points Platinum = 80+ PointsC = Civil/ Landscape

1 5 0 6

A/OWN 1 1 ID Credit 1.1 Innovation in Design (provide specific title) Innovation design ideas to be determined.

1 1 ID Credit 1.2 Innovation in Design (provide specific title)

1 1 ID Credit 1.3 Innovation in Design (provide specific title)

1 1 ID Credit 1.4 Innovation in Design (provide specific title)

1 1 ID Credit 1.5 Innovation in Design (provide specific title)

1 1 ID Credit 2 LEED Accredited Professional

2 2 0 4

1 1 RP Credit 1.1 Regional Priority Credit: Regional materials MRc5

1 1 RP Credit 1.2 Regional Priority Credit: Water use reduction WEc3

1 1 RP Credit 1.3 Regional Priority Credit: Water efficient landscaping WEc1

1 1 RP Credit 1.4 Regional Priority Credit: Onsite renewable energy EAc2

Regional Priority Credit: Innovative wastewater technologies WEc2

Regional Priority Credit: Site development – protect or restore habitat SSc5.1

57 27 26 110 TOTALS Note: All prerequisites must be met before a single point may be earned. If you cannot achieve all of the prerequisites you cannot be LEED certified. Certified = 40-49 Points Silver = 50-59 Points Gold = 60-79

Points Platinum = 80+ Points

Innovation in Design

Regional Priority Credits

Page 6 of 6

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

 

Appendix 5. AV SYSTEMS

AV Systems Schematic Design Quote

Network and Electrical Considerations

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

1ST FLOOR CONF 2 $307.30 $614.60ATLONAAT-HDVS-TX-WP HDMI and VGA Transmitter wall plate

2 $351.21 $702.42ATLONAAT-HDVS-RX Atlona Hdmi Receiver With Built-In Scaler

1 $1,097.55 $1,097.55ATLONAAT-H2H-44M Atlona 4 by 4 HDMI Matrix Switcher

2 $3,036.59 $6,073.18NECNP-PA550W-13ZL Nec Np-Pa550w With Np13zl. Bundle Includes Pa550w Projector And Np13

2 $99.23 $198.46CHIEFRPAUW Chief-Universal Rpa White

2 $42.24 $84.48CHIEFCMA110 Chief Cma-110 Flat Ceiling Plate

2 $5,973.17 $11,946.34DALITE70242L TENSIONED LARGE ADVANTAGE® ELECTROL® – 16:10 WIDE FORMA

1 $11,096.71 $11,096.71LIFESIZE1000-0000-1137 LifeSize Team 220 – 10x – Dual MicPod

1 $831.71 $831.71LIFESIZE1000-21E0-1129 LifeSize Team 220 – Partner Assurance Maintenance Services (1-year)

1 $2,133.29 $2,133.29LIFESIZE1000-0000-0410 LifeSize Camera 10x

1 $153.66 $153.66LIFESIZE1000-21E0-0410 LISFESIZE CAMERA 10X ASSURANCE SERVICES

2 $109.76 $219.52VADDIO535-2000-234 Thin Profile Wall Mount for LifeSize 10x Camera

1 $204.87 $204.87ATLONAAT-HD570 ATLONA HDMI DE-EMBEDER

1 $548.78 $548.78CRESTRONC2N-VEQ4 Crestron 4-Channel Volume/EQ Control Mod

1 $356.33 $356.33CROWN180A CROWN 180A 80W POWER AMPLIFIER

4 $141.06 $564.24TOAF-2852CU2 TOA,Co-axial Ceiling Speaker, 6.5”, Back-can, 25/70.7 V Xfmr, 60 W, 8/16

1 $454.72 $454.72MID ATLANTICSRSR-4-20 MID ATLANTIC-20 Space Rotation Sliding Rack

1 $128.05 $128.05APCG5BLK APC-Premium surge protection and noise filtering, 15 AMP,rack mount

2 $1,080.95 $2,161.90ALTINEXPNP402C Altinex-Factory Configured Pnp402 Pop ”N Plug

1 $1,097.56 $1,097.56CRESTRONCP3 Crestron 3-Series Control System

1 $792.68 $792.68CRESTRONTSW-550-B-S 5” Touch Screen, Black Smooth

1 $60.98 $60.98CRESTRONPWE-4803RU CRESTRON-PoE Injector universal 100-250 Volts AC

1 $274.39 $274.39NetgearGS108P-100NAS Netgear Gs108p Prosafe Ethernet Switch – 8-Port

32 $90.00 $2,880.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

5 $100.00 $500.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

Page 1 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

8 $100.00 $800.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

2 $304.88 $609.76CCSCUT IN CCS-Cut Hole In Furniture

1 $213.41 $213.41CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

1 $805.35 $805.35LIFESIZE1000-21E0-1129 LifeSize Team 220 – Partner Assurance Maintenance Services (1-year)

$47,784.941ST FLOOR CONF Subtotal

2 ND FLOOR TESTING 3 $358.17 $1,074.51ALTINEXTNP128C ALTINEX TNP128 CUSTOM CONFIGURED

3 $1,097.55 $3,292.65ATLONAAT-H2H-44M Atlona 4 by 4 HDMI Matrix Switcher

12 $307.30 $3,687.60ATLONAAT-HDVS-TX-WP HDMI and VGA Transmitter wall plate

3 $204.87 $614.61ATLONAAT-HD570 ATLONA HDMI DE-EMBEDER

12 $351.21 $4,214.52ATLONAAT-HDVS-RX Atlona Hdmi Receiver With Built-In Scaler

3 $1,097.55 $3,292.65ATLONAAT-H2H-44M Atlona 4 by 4 HDMI Matrix Switcher

3 $90.00 $270.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

3 $396.34 $1,189.02CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

112 $90.00 $10,080.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

3 $90.00 $270.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

16 $100.00 $1,600.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

17 $100.00 $1,700.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

3 $199.76 $599.28CHIEFLTMU Chief Tilt Mount

3 $42.24 $126.72CHIEFCMA110 Chief Cma-110 Flat Ceiling Plate

3 $99.23 $297.69CHIEFRPAUW Chief-Universal Rpa White

1,050 $0.60 $630.00COVIDCAT3800-6F Cable, CAT6, Shielded, Plenum

Page 2 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

3 $36.89 $110.67COVIDQT-0039133 COVID WALL PLATE

12 $6.13 $73.56COVIDVPR1211-06AM VGA CABLE WITH AUDIO 6 FOOT

30 $6.96 $208.80COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

6 $179.04 $1,074.24COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

3 $1,097.56 $3,292.68CRESTRONCP3 Crestron 3-Series Control System

3 $548.78 $1,646.34CRESTRONC2N-VEQ4 Crestron 4-Channel Volume/EQ Control Mod

3 $548.78 $1,646.34CRESTRONC2N-VEQ4 Crestron 4-Channel Volume/EQ Control Mod

3 $1,170.73 $3,512.19CRESTRONMPC-M25-B-T Crestron Bk Media Presentation Cntroler

3 $465.40 $1,396.20CROWN1160A Crown Audio Amp 1 Inputs (1) 160W Outputs 70V/4 Ohm

3 $5,973.17 $17,919.51DALITE70242L TENSIONED LARGE ADVANTAGE® ELECTROL® – 16:10 WIDE FORMA

3 $5,973.17 $17,919.51DALITE70242L TENSIONED LARGE ADVANTAGE® ELECTROL® – 16:10 WIDE FORMA

1 $914.63 $914.63FSRFLOOR BOX CUSTOM FLOOR BOX COMPLETE

3 $622.48 $1,867.44MID ATLANTICPTRK-2726 27 SPACE (47 1/4″) 26″ DEEP PORTABLE ROLLING RACK WITH LOCKI

3 $622.48 $1,867.44MID ATLANTICPTRK-2726 27 SPACE (47 1/4″) 26″ DEEP PORTABLE ROLLING RACK WITH LOCKI

3 $3,036.59 $9,109.77NECNP-PA550W-13ZL Nec Np-Pa550w With Np13zl. Bundle Includes Pa550w Projector And Np13

3 $274.39 $823.17NetgearGS108P-100NAS Netgear Gs108p Prosafe Ethernet Switch – 8-Port

3 $5,974.39 $17,923.17SMARTSBID8055i-SMP SMART SBID8055i-SMP: SMART Board 55” Interactive Display with SMAR

24 $141.06 $3,385.44TOAF-2852CU2 TOA,Co-axial Ceiling Speaker, 6.5”, Back-can, 25/70.7 V Xfmr, 60 W, 8/16

1 $199.76 $199.76CHIEFLTMU Chief Tilt Mount

$117,830.112 ND FLOOR TESTING Subtotal

2 ND FLOOR TUTORIAL 3 $307.30 $921.90ATLONAAT-HDVS-TX-WP HDMI and VGA Transmitter wall plate

3 $351.21 $1,053.63ATLONAAT-HDVS-RX Atlona Hdmi Receiver With Built-In Scaler

1 $1,097.55 $1,097.55ATLONAAT-H2H-44M Atlona 4 by 4 HDMI Matrix Switcher

Page 3 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

2 $3,036.59 $6,073.18NECNP-PA550W-13ZL Nec Np-Pa550w With Np13zl. Bundle Includes Pa550w Projector And Np13

2 $99.23 $198.46CHIEFRPAUW Chief-Universal Rpa White

2 $42.24 $84.48CHIEFCMA110 Chief Cma-110 Flat Ceiling Plate

2 $5,973.17 $11,946.34DALITE70242L TENSIONED LARGE ADVANTAGE® ELECTROL® – 16:10 WIDE FORMA

2 $204.87 $409.74ATLONAAT-HD570 ATLONA HDMI DE-EMBEDER

2 $548.78 $1,097.56CRESTRONC2N-VEQ4 Crestron 4-Channel Volume/EQ Control Mod

2 $356.33 $712.66CROWN180A CROWN 180A 80W POWER AMPLIFIER

1 $622.48 $622.48MID ATLANTICPTRK-2726 27 SPACE (47 1/4″) 26″ DEEP PORTABLE ROLLING RACK WITH LOCKI

6 $141.06 $846.36TOAF-2852CU2 TOA,Co-axial Ceiling Speaker, 6.5”, Back-can, 25/70.7 V Xfmr, 60 W, 8/16

1 $352.44 $352.44CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

40 $90.00 $3,600.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

6 $100.00 $600.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

8 $100.00 $800.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

1 $1,097.56 $1,097.56CRESTRONCP3 Crestron 3-Series Control System

1 $60.98 $60.98CRESTRONPWE-4803RU CRESTRON-PoE Injector universal 100-250 Volts AC

1 $792.68 $792.68CRESTRONTSW-550 5” Touch Screen, Black Smooth [Just Released]

1 $335.37 $335.37NetgearGS116E-100NAS NETGEEAR, PROSAFE Plus 16 port Gigabitswitch

1 $128.05 $128.05APCG5BLK APC-Premium surge protection and noise filtering, 15 AMP,rack mount

$33,011.422 ND FLOOR TUTORIAL Subtotal

2ND CLASSROOM 3 $358.17 $1,074.51ALTINEXTNP128C ALTINEX TNP128 CUSTOM CONFIGURED

3 $1,170.73 $3,512.19CRESTRONMPC-M25-B-T Crestron Bk Media Presentation Cntroler

Page 4 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

3 $274.39 $823.17NetgearGS108P-100NAS Netgear Gs108p Prosafe Ethernet Switch – 8-Port

3 $1,097.55 $3,292.65ATLONAAT-H2H-44M Atlona 4 by 4 HDMI Matrix Switcher

3 $548.78 $1,646.34CRESTRONC2N-VEQ4 Crestron 4-Channel Volume/EQ Control Mod

3 $622.48 $1,867.44MID ATLANTICPTRK-2726 27 SPACE (47 1/4″) 26″ DEEP PORTABLE ROLLING RACK WITH LOCKI

3 $1,097.56 $3,292.68CRESTRONCP3 Crestron 3-Series Control System

12 $307.30 $3,687.60ATLONAAT-HDVS-TX-WP HDMI and VGA Transmitter wall plate

12 $351.21 $4,214.52ATLONAAT-HDVS-RX Atlona Hdmi Receiver With Built-In Scaler

3 $1,097.55 $3,292.65ATLONAAT-H2H-44M Atlona 4 by 4 HDMI Matrix Switcher

3 $99.23 $297.69CHIEFRPAUW Chief-Universal Rpa White

3 $42.24 $126.72CHIEFCMA110 Chief Cma-110 Flat Ceiling Plate

3 $3,036.59 $9,109.77NECNP-PA550W-13ZL Nec Np-Pa550w With Np13zl. Bundle Includes Pa550w Projector And Np13

3 $5,973.17 $17,919.51DALITE70242L TENSIONED LARGE ADVANTAGE® ELECTROL® – 16:10 WIDE FORMA

3 $204.87 $614.61ATLONAAT-HD570 ATLONA HDMI DE-EMBEDER

3 $548.78 $1,646.34CRESTRONC2N-VEQ4 Crestron 4-Channel Volume/EQ Control Mod

3 $465.40 $1,396.20CROWN1160A Crown Audio Amp 1 Inputs (1) 160W Outputs 70V/4 Ohm

24 $141.06 $3,385.44TOAF-2852CU2 TOA,Co-axial Ceiling Speaker, 6.5”, Back-can, 25/70.7 V Xfmr, 60 W, 8/16

3 $5,973.17 $17,919.51DALITE70242L TENSIONED LARGE ADVANTAGE® ELECTROL® – 16:10 WIDE FORMA

3 $5,974.39 $17,923.17SMARTSBID8055i-SMP SMART SBID8055i-SMP: SMART Board 55” Interactive Display with SMAR

3 $199.76 $599.28CHIEFLTMU Chief Tilt Mount

3 $36.89 $110.67COVIDQT-0039133 COVID WALL PLATE

30 $6.96 $208.80COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

12 $6.13 $73.56COVIDVPR1211-06AM VGA CABLE WITH AUDIO 6 FOOT

1,050 $0.60 $630.00COVIDCAT3800-6F Cable, CAT6, Shielded, Plenum

3 $622.48 $1,867.44MID ATLANTICPTRK-2726 27 SPACE (47 1/4″) 26″ DEEP PORTABLE ROLLING RACK WITH LOCKI

6 $179.04 $1,074.24COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

Page 5 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

3 $3,047.56 $9,142.68SMARTFSSBID-100 SMART MOBILE CART

3 $396.34 $1,189.02CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

112 $90.00 $10,080.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

17 $100.00 $1,700.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

16 $100.00 $1,600.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

3 $90.00 $270.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

3 $90.00 $270.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

1 $914.63 $914.63FSRFLOOR BOX CUSTOM FLOOR BOX COMPLETE

$126,773.032ND CLASSROOM Subtotal

2ND FLOOR CONFERENCE 2 $1,080.95 $2,161.90ALTINEXPNP402C Altinex-Factory Configured Pnp402 Pop ”N Plug

2 $307.30 $614.60ATLONAAT-HDVS-TX-WP HDMI and VGA Transmitter wall plate

2 $351.21 $702.42ATLONAAT-HDVS-RX Atlona Hdmi Receiver With Built-In Scaler

1 $1,097.55 $1,097.55ATLONAAT-H2H-44M Atlona 4 by 4 HDMI Matrix Switcher

1 $3,036.59 $3,036.59NECNP-PA550W-13ZL Nec Np-Pa550w With Np13zl. Bundle Includes Pa550w Projector And Np13

1 $99.23 $99.23CHIEFRPAUW Chief-Universal Rpa White

1 $42.24 $42.24CHIEFCMA110 Chief Cma-110 Flat Ceiling Plate

1 $5,973.17 $5,973.17DALITE70242L TENSIONED LARGE ADVANTAGE® ELECTROL® – 16:10 WIDE FORMA

1 $204.87 $204.87ATLONAAT-HD570 ATLONA HDMI DE-EMBEDER

1 $548.78 $548.78CRESTRONC2N-VEQ4 Crestron 4-Channel Volume/EQ Control Mod

1 $356.33 $356.33CROWN180A CROWN 180A 80W POWER AMPLIFIER

4 $141.06 $564.24TOAF-2852CU2 TOA,Co-axial Ceiling Speaker, 6.5”, Back-can, 25/70.7 V Xfmr, 60 W, 8/16

5 $6.96 $34.80COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

2 $6.13 $12.26COVIDVPR1211-06AM VGA CABLE WITH AUDIO 6 FOOT

Page 6 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

1 $179.04 $179.04COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

150 $0.60 $90.00COVIDCAT3800-6F Cable, CAT6, Shielded, Plenum

1 $454.72 $454.72MID ATLANTICSRSR-4-20 MID ATLANTIC-20 Space Rotation Sliding Rack

1 $914.63 $914.63FSRFLOOR BOX CUSTOM FLOOR BOX COMPLETE

1 $182.93 $182.93CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

24 $90.00 $2,160.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSAPPLICATIONS PROG CCS- Applications Programming

2 $250.00 $500.00CCSCUT IN CCS-Cut Hole In Furniture

1 $274.39 $274.39NetgearGS108P-100NAS Netgear Gs108p Prosafe Ethernet Switch – 8-Port

1 $1,170.73 $1,170.73CRESTRONMPC-M25-B-T Crestron Bk Media Presentation Cntroler

$21,855.422ND FLOOR CONFERENCE Subtotal

2ND FLOOR LOBBY 2 $1,142.68 $2,285.36NEC DISPLAYV423-AVT NEC,V423 42” LED LCD Monitor 1920×1080 (FHD), integrated ATSC Tune

2 $92.45 $184.90CHIEFMSTU CHIEF-MEDIUM FIXED THINSTALL UNIVERSAL

2 $597.56 $1,195.12Bright SignXD1230 Bright Sign Xd1230: Full Hd Interactive Display Controller With Live Hdtv P

2 $6.96 $13.92COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

8 $90.00 $720.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

2 $100.00 $200.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

Page 7 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

$4,689.302ND FLOOR LOBBY Subtotal

2ND FLOOR LOUNGE 2 $1,142.68 $2,285.36NEC DISPLAYV423-AVT NEC,V423 42” LED LCD Monitor 1920×1080 (FHD), integrated ATSC Tune

2 $92.45 $184.90CHIEFMSTU CHIEF-MEDIUM FIXED THINSTALL UNIVERSAL

2 $36.89 $73.78COVIDQT-0039133 COVID WALL PLATE

2 $179.04 $358.08COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

2 $83.09 $166.18COVIDP-CVGAAID-50M COVID P-CVGAAID-50M: VGA Cable w/ Aud, Plenum, M/M, Passes ID Bits

8 $90.00 $720.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

$4,068.302ND FLOOR LOUNGE Subtotal

3RD FLOOR CONFERENCE 1 $356.33 $356.33CROWN180A CROWN 180A 80W POWER AMPLIFIER

1 $5,973.17 $5,973.17DALITE70242L TENSIONED LARGE ADVANTAGE® ELECTROL® – 16:10 WIDE FORMA

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSAPPLICATIONS PROG CCS- Applications Programming

1 $1,097.55 $1,097.55ATLONAAT-H2H-44M Atlona 4 by 4 HDMI Matrix Switcher

1 $204.87 $204.87ATLONAAT-HD570 ATLONA HDMI DE-EMBEDER

2 $351.21 $702.42ATLONAAT-HDVS-RX Atlona Hdmi Receiver With Built-In Scaler

2 $307.30 $614.60ATLONAAT-HDVS-TX-WP HDMI and VGA Transmitter wall plate

1 $548.78 $548.78CRESTRONC2N-VEQ4 Crestron 4-Channel Volume/EQ Control Mod

150 $0.60 $90.00COVIDCAT3800-6F Cable, CAT6, Shielded, Plenum

1 $42.24 $42.24CHIEFCMA110 Chief Cma-110 Flat Ceiling Plate

Page 8 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

2 $250.00 $500.00CCSCUT IN CCS-Cut Hole In Furniture

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

6 $141.06 $846.36TOAF-2852CU2 TOA,Co-axial Ceiling Speaker, 6.5”, Back-can, 25/70.7 V Xfmr, 60 W, 8/16

1 $914.63 $914.63FSRFLOOR BOX CUSTOM FLOOR BOX COMPLETE

1 $274.39 $274.39NetgearGS108P-100NAS Netgear Gs108p Prosafe Ethernet Switch – 8-Port

24 $90.00 $2,160.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

1 $182.93 $182.93CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

1 $1,170.73 $1,170.73CRESTRONMPC-M25-B-T Crestron Bk Media Presentation Cntroler

1 $3,036.59 $3,036.59NECNP-PA550W-13ZL Nec Np-Pa550w With Np13zl. Bundle Includes Pa550w Projector And Np13

1 $179.04 $179.04COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

2 $1,080.95 $2,161.90ALTINEXPNP402C Altinex-Factory Configured Pnp402 Pop ””N Plug

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

1 $99.23 $99.23CHIEFRPAUW Chief-Universal Rpa White

1 $454.72 $454.72MID ATLANTICSRSR-4-20 MID ATLANTIC-20 Space Rotation Sliding Rack

5 $6.96 $34.80COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

2 $6.13 $12.26COVIDVPR1211-06AM VGA CABLE WITH AUDIO 6 FOOT

$22,137.543RD FLOOR CONFERENCE Subtotal

3RD FLOOR LOBBY 1 $1,142.68 $1,142.68NEC DISPLAYV423-AVT NEC,V423 42” LED LCD Monitor 1920×1080 (FHD), integrated ATSC Tune

1 $92.45 $92.45CHIEFMSTU CHIEF-MEDIUM FIXED THINSTALL UNIVERSAL

1 $597.56 $597.56Bright SignXD1230 Bright Sign Xd1230: Full Hd Interactive Display Controller With Live Hdtv P

1 $6.96 $6.96COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

Page 9 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

$1,839.653RD FLOOR LOBBY Subtotal

3RD FLOOR LOUNGE 1 $1,142.68 $1,142.68NEC DISPLAYV423-AVT NEC,V423 42” LED LCD Monitor 1920×1080 (FHD), integrated ATSC Tune

1 $92.45 $92.45CHIEFMSTU CHIEF-MEDIUM FIXED THINSTALL UNIVERSAL

1 $36.89 $36.89COVIDQT-0039133 COVID WALL PLATE

1 $179.04 $179.04COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

1 $83.09 $83.09COVIDP-CVGAAID-50M COVID P-CVGAAID-50M: VGA Cable w/ Aud, Plenum, M/M, Passes ID Bits

4 $90.00 $360.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

$2,174.153RD FLOOR LOUNGE Subtotal

3RD FLOOR SM CONFERE 1 $356.33 $356.33CROWN180A CROWN 180A 80W POWER AMPLIFIER

1 $5,973.17 $5,973.17DALITE70242L TENSIONED LARGE ADVANTAGE® ELECTROL® – 16:10 WIDE FORMA

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSAPPLICATIONS PROG CCS- Applications Programming

1 $1,097.55 $1,097.55ATLONAAT-H2H-44M Atlona 4 by 4 HDMI Matrix Switcher

1 $204.87 $204.87ATLONAAT-HD570 ATLONA HDMI DE-EMBEDER

2 $351.21 $702.42ATLONAAT-HDVS-RX Atlona Hdmi Receiver With Built-In Scaler

2 $307.30 $614.60ATLONAAT-HDVS-TX-WP HDMI and VGA Transmitter wall plate

1 $548.78 $548.78CRESTRONC2N-VEQ4 Crestron 4-Channel Volume/EQ Control Mod

150 $0.60 $90.00COVIDCAT3800-6F Cable, CAT6, Shielded, Plenum

2 $250.00 $500.00CCSCUT IN CCS-Cut Hole In Furniture

Page 10 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

4 $141.06 $564.24TOAF-2852CU2 TOA,Co-axial Ceiling Speaker, 6.5”, Back-can, 25/70.7 V Xfmr, 60 W, 8/16

1 $914.63 $914.63FSRFLOOR BOX CUSTOM FLOOR BOX COMPLETE

1 $274.39 $274.39NetgearGS108P-100NAS Netgear Gs108p Prosafe Ethernet Switch – 8-Port

24 $90.00 $2,160.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

1 $182.93 $182.93CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

1 $1,170.73 $1,170.73CRESTRONMPC-M25-B-T Crestron Bk Media Presentation Cntroler

1 $179.04 $179.04COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

2 $1,080.95 $2,161.90ALTINEXPNP402C Altinex-Factory Configured Pnp402 Pop ””””N Plug

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

1 $454.72 $454.72MID ATLANTICSRSR-4-20 MID ATLANTIC-20 Space Rotation Sliding Rack

5 $6.96 $34.80COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

2 $6.13 $12.26COVIDVPR1211-06AM VGA CABLE WITH AUDIO 6 FOOT

1 $5,296.34 $5,296.34NEC DISPLAYV651-avt NEC V Series 65″ Lcd Public Display Monitor 1920 X 1080

1 $199.76 $199.76CHIEFLTMU Chief Tilt Mount

$24,173.463RD FLOOR SM CONFERENCE Subtotal

4TH FLOOR CONFERENCE 1 $356.33 $356.33CROWN180A CROWN 180A 80W POWER AMPLIFIER

1 $5,973.17 $5,973.17DALITE70242L TENSIONED LARGE ADVANTAGE® ELECTROL® – 16:10 WIDE FORMA

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSAPPLICATIONS PROG CCS- Applications Programming

1 $1,097.55 $1,097.55ATLONAAT-H2H-44M Atlona 4 by 4 HDMI Matrix Switcher

1 $204.87 $204.87ATLONAAT-HD570 ATLONA HDMI DE-EMBEDER

Page 11 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

2 $351.21 $702.42ATLONAAT-HDVS-RX Atlona Hdmi Receiver With Built-In Scaler

2 $307.30 $614.60ATLONAAT-HDVS-TX-WP HDMI and VGA Transmitter wall plate

1 $548.78 $548.78CRESTRONC2N-VEQ4 Crestron 4-Channel Volume/EQ Control Mod

150 $0.60 $90.00COVIDCAT3800-6F Cable, CAT6, Shielded, Plenum

1 $42.24 $42.24CHIEFCMA110 Chief Cma-110 Flat Ceiling Plate

2 $250.00 $500.00CCSCUT IN CCS-Cut Hole In Furniture

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

6 $141.06 $846.36TOAF-2852CU2 TOA,Co-axial Ceiling Speaker, 6.5”, Back-can, 25/70.7 V Xfmr, 60 W, 8/16

1 $914.63 $914.63FSRFLOOR BOX CUSTOM FLOOR BOX COMPLETE

1 $274.39 $274.39NetgearGS108P-100NAS Netgear Gs108p Prosafe Ethernet Switch – 8-Port

24 $90.00 $2,160.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

1 $182.93 $182.93CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

1 $1,170.73 $1,170.73CRESTRONMPC-M25-B-T Crestron Bk Media Presentation Cntroler

1 $3,036.59 $3,036.59NECNP-PA550W-13ZL Nec Np-Pa550w With Np13zl. Bundle Includes Pa550w Projector And Np13

1 $179.04 $179.04COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

2 $1,080.95 $2,161.90ALTINEXPNP402C Altinex-Factory Configured Pnp402 Pop ””””””””N Plug

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

1 $99.23 $99.23CHIEFRPAUW Chief-Universal Rpa White

1 $454.72 $454.72MID ATLANTICSRSR-4-20 MID ATLANTIC-20 Space Rotation Sliding Rack

5 $6.96 $34.80COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

2 $6.13 $12.26COVIDVPR1211-06AM VGA CABLE WITH AUDIO 6 FOOT

$22,137.544TH FLOOR CONFERENCE LG Subtotal

Page 12 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

4TH FLOOR CONFERENCE 1 $356.33 $356.33CROWN180A CROWN 180A 80W POWER AMPLIFIER

1 $5,973.17 $5,973.17DALITE70242L TENSIONED LARGE ADVANTAGE® ELECTROL® – 16:10 WIDE FORMA

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSAPPLICATIONS PROG CCS- Applications Programming

1 $1,097.55 $1,097.55ATLONAAT-H2H-44M Atlona 4 by 4 HDMI Matrix Switcher

1 $204.87 $204.87ATLONAAT-HD570 ATLONA HDMI DE-EMBEDER

2 $351.21 $702.42ATLONAAT-HDVS-RX Atlona Hdmi Receiver With Built-In Scaler

2 $307.30 $614.60ATLONAAT-HDVS-TX-WP HDMI and VGA Transmitter wall plate

1 $548.78 $548.78CRESTRONC2N-VEQ4 Crestron 4-Channel Volume/EQ Control Mod

150 $0.60 $90.00COVIDCAT3800-6F Cable, CAT6, Shielded, Plenum

1 $42.24 $42.24CHIEFCMA110 Chief Cma-110 Flat Ceiling Plate

2 $250.00 $500.00CCSCUT IN CCS-Cut Hole In Furniture

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

4 $141.06 $564.24TOAF-2852CU2 TOA,Co-axial Ceiling Speaker, 6.5”, Back-can, 25/70.7 V Xfmr, 60 W, 8/16

1 $914.63 $914.63FSRFLOOR BOX CUSTOM FLOOR BOX COMPLETE

1 $274.39 $274.39NetgearGS108P-100NAS Netgear Gs108p Prosafe Ethernet Switch – 8-Port

24 $90.00 $2,160.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

1 $182.93 $182.93CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

1 $1,170.73 $1,170.73CRESTRONMPC-M25-B-T Crestron Bk Media Presentation Cntroler

1 $3,036.59 $3,036.59NECNP-PA550W-13ZL Nec Np-Pa550w With Np13zl. Bundle Includes Pa550w Projector And Np13

1 $179.04 $179.04COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

2 $1,080.95 $2,161.90ALTINEXPNP402C Altinex-Factory Configured Pnp402 Pop ””””N Plug

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

1 $99.23 $99.23CHIEFRPAUW Chief-Universal Rpa White

Page 13 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

1 $454.72 $454.72MID ATLANTICSRSR-4-20 MID ATLANTIC-20 Space Rotation Sliding Rack

5 $6.96 $34.80COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

2 $6.13 $12.26COVIDVPR1211-06AM VGA CABLE WITH AUDIO 6 FOOT

$21,855.424TH FLOOR CONFERENCE MD Subtotal

4TH FLOOR LOBBY 1 $1,142.68 $1,142.68NEC DISPLAYV423-AVT NEC,V423 42” LED LCD Monitor 1920×1080 (FHD), integrated ATSC Tune

1 $92.45 $92.45CHIEFMSTU CHIEF-MEDIUM FIXED THINSTALL UNIVERSAL

1 $597.56 $597.56Bright SignXD1230 Bright Sign Xd1230: Full Hd Interactive Display Controller With Live Hdtv P

1 $6.96 $6.96COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

$1,839.654TH FLOOR LOBBY Subtotal

4TH FLOOR LOUNGE 1 $1,142.68 $1,142.68NEC DISPLAYV423-AVT NEC,V423 42” LED LCD Monitor 1920×1080 (FHD), integrated ATSC Tune

1 $92.45 $92.45CHIEFMSTU CHIEF-MEDIUM FIXED THINSTALL UNIVERSAL

1 $36.89 $36.89COVIDQT-0039133 COVID WALL PLATE

1 $179.04 $179.04COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

1 $83.09 $83.09COVIDP-CVGAAID-50M COVID P-CVGAAID-50M: VGA Cable w/ Aud, Plenum, M/M, Passes ID Bits

4 $90.00 $360.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

$2,174.154TH FLOOR LOUNGE Subtotal

AUDIOTORIUM

Page 14 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

5 $208.98 $1,044.90JBLCONTROL 19CST JBL 8″ Ceiling Subwoofer W/70V Tramsform

1 $1,124.76 $1,124.76CROWNcdi4000 Crown CDI series amplifiers

1 $1,584.15 $1,584.15BIAMPNEXIA CS Bi Amp 10 X 6 Dsp Processor

1 $204.87 $204.87ATLONAAT-HD570 ATLONA HDMI DE-EMBEDER

2 $865.85 $1,731.70SHUREULXP14/85-G3 Shure Includes WL185 Microflex Cardioid Lavalier Microphone

2 $840.24 $1,680.48SHUREULXP24/58-G3 Shure Wireless Handheld Mic And Reciever System

1 $425.61 $425.61SHUREUA844SWB Shure Wb Uhf 4 Way Active Ant. Splitter

2 $122.90 $245.80SHUREUA830WB Shure Wideband Uhf In-Lne Antenna Amplif

1 $25.61 $25.61SHUREUA820G Shure 1/2 Wave Omnidirectional Antenna for U4D and U4Sin the G1 band

1 $262.20 $262.20SHUREMX418D/S Shure Supercard. 18 Goose

1 $12.33 $12.33PROCOEXM-25 Proco-Mic Xf/Xm 25Ft Lo-Z

3 $66.91 $200.73COVIDQT-0037154 COVID FLOOR BOX INSERT 1 MD 1 XLR

4 $307.30 $1,229.20ATLONAAT-HDVS-TX-WP HDMI and VGA Transmitter wall plate

6 $351.21 $2,107.26ATLONAAT-HDVS-RX Atlona Hdmi Receiver With Built-In Scaler

1 $2,634.13 $2,634.13ATLONAAT-H2H-88M Atlona 8 by 8 HDMI Matrix Switcher

7 $256.09 $1,792.63ATLONAAT-HDTX-RSNET ATLONA AT-HDTX-RSNET: Atlona HDMI Transmitter w/IR, RS-232, and E

7 $256.09 $1,792.63ATLONAAT-HDRX-RSNET ATLONA AT-HDRX-RSNET: Atlona HDMI Receiver w/IR, RS-232, and Ethe

2 $5,973.17 $11,946.34DALITE70242L TENSIONED LARGE ADVANTAGE® ELECTROL® – 16:10 WIDE FORMA

2 $11,161.62 $22,323.24EPSONV11H462920 Epson PowerLite Pro Z8450WUNL Projector

2 $1,023.17 $2,046.34EPSONV12H004S04 Motorized Standard Zoom Lens, 1.71-2.78:1 Ratio

2 $308.63 $617.26CHIEFVCMU Chief Heavy Duty Universal Projector Mount

2 $38.93 $77.86CHIEFCMA395 Chief-Angled Ceiling Plate

5 $597.56 $2,987.80Bright SignXD1230 Bright Sign Xd1230: Full Hd Interactive Display Controller With Live Hdtv P

5 $1,142.68 $5,713.40NEC DISPLAYV423-AVT NEC,V423 42” LED LCD Monitor 1920×1080 (FHD), integrated ATSC Tune

5 $92.45 $462.25CHIEFMSTU CHIEF-MEDIUM FIXED THINSTALL UNIVERSAL

Page 15 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

1 $3,048.78 $3,048.78Euro DesignEURO LECTERN EURO DEISGN LECTERN

1 $358.17 $358.17ALTINEXTNP128C ALTINEX TNP128 CUSTOM CONFIGURED

32 $6.96 $222.72COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

5 $6.13 $30.65COVIDVPR1211-06AM VGA CABLE WITH AUDIO 6 FOOT

2 $207.32 $414.64SHUREUA8100 SHURE 100′ UHF REMOTE ANTENNA CABLE

1,500 $0.99 $1,485.00COVIDCAT 3800 6F COVID,BULK CABLE, PLENUM SHIELDED CAT 6, BLUE

1 $1,790.67 $1,790.67MID ATLANTICMRK-4426-AV Middle Atlantic Mrk-4426-Av; 44 Space (77”), 26” Deep Gangable Rack Co

1 $128.05 $128.05APCG5BLK APC-Premium surge protection and noise filtering, 15 AMP,rack mount

1 $1,097.56 $1,097.56CRESTRONCP3 Crestron 3-Series Control System

1 $365.85 $365.85CRESTRONCEN-HPRFGW Crestron High Powered Rf Gateway

1 $1,097.56 $1,097.56CRESTRONTPS-6X-DSW Crestron-Wall Mount Docking Station For Tps-6X Gloss Black. For Mountin

1 $1,951.22 $1,951.22CRESTRONTPS-6X Crestron Isys 5.7″ Wireless Touchpanel

1 $274.39 $274.39NetgearGS116E-100NAS NETGEEAR, PROSAFE Plus 16 port Gigabitswitch

96 $90.00 $8,640.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

15 $100.00 $1,500.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

16 $100.00 $1,600.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

4 $100.00 $400.00CCSAPPLICATIONS PROG CCS- Applications Programming

1 $243.90 $243.90CCSLIFT FIRST DAY Ccs-First Day Lift Rate

5 $91.46 $457.30CCSLIFT OTHER DAYS Ccs-Powered Man Lift All Other Days

3 $914.63 $2,743.89FSRFLOOR BOX CUSTOM FLOOR BOX COMPLETE

1 $792.68 $792.68CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

$93,096.51AUDIOTORIUM Subtotal

Page 16 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

AUDITORIUM 25 $143.67 $3,591.75JBLCONTROL 26CT Jbl 6 Ceiling Speakers W/Trans (Each)

$3,591.75AUDITORIUM Subtotal

INTERVIEW ROOMS 2 $664.63 $1,329.26CRESTRONMPC-M10-B-T Crestron-Media Presentation Controller? M10 – 10 Buttons & Volume Contr

2 $36.89 $73.78COVIDQT-0038182 COVID CUSTOM WALL PLATE

2 $92.45 $184.90CHIEFMSTU CHIEF-MEDIUM FIXED THINSTALL UNIVERSAL

2 $1,142.68 $2,285.36NEC DISPLAYV423-AVT NEC,V423 42” LED LCD Monitor 1920×1080 (FHD), integrated ATSC Tune

1 $179.04 $179.04COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

1 $83.09 $83.09COVIDP-CVGAAID-50M COVID P-CVGAAID-50M: VGA Cable w/ Aud, Plenum, M/M, Passes ID Bits

2 $91.46 $182.92CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

16 $90.00 $1,440.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

3 $100.00 $300.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

4 $100.00 $400.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

$6,638.35INTERVIEW ROOMS Subtotal

MATH CENTER 15 $597.56 $8,963.40Bright SignXD1230 Bright Sign Xd1230: Full Hd Interactive Display Controller With Live Hdtv P

15 $1,142.68 $17,140.20NEC DISPLAYV423-AVT NEC,V423 42” LED LCD Monitor 1920×1080 (FHD), integrated ATSC Tune

3 $92.45 $277.35CHIEFMSTU CHIEF-MEDIUM FIXED THINSTALL UNIVERSAL

12 $199.76 $2,397.12CHIEFLTMU Chief Tilt Mount

16 $43.89 $702.24COVIDQT-0039188 COVID WALL PLATE

Page 17 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

4 $99.23 $396.92CHIEFRPAUW Chief-Universal Rpa White

4 $42.24 $168.96CHIEFCMA110 Chief Cma-110 Flat Ceiling Plate

4 $3,036.59 $12,146.36NECNP-PA550W-13ZL Nec Np-Pa550w With Np13zl. Bundle Includes Pa550w Projector And Np13

53 $55.54 $2,943.62QUAMMA/E9/S2/T8 Quam Sound Masking Speaker,8″,Upward Facing

1 $1,188.70 $1,188.70CROWNCTS1200 Crown Amp

1 $548.78 $548.78CRESTRONC2N-VEQ4 Crestron 4-Channel Volume/EQ Control Mod

1 $183.11 $183.11ATLAS SOUNDTSD-GPN1200 ATLAS SOUND TSD, SND MSK GEN, 12W, 70V OUT

12 $158.54 $1,902.48CRESTRONC2N-DB8B CRESTRON-8-Button Decorator Keypad Fits Standard Electrical Gang Bo

2 $182.93 $365.86CRESTRONC2N-HBLOCK Crestron Multi-Type Distribution Block

1 $152.44 $152.44CRESTRONPW-2420RU CRESTRON PWR PACK 24VDC 2.0A/REG UNIV

1 $1,097.56 $1,097.56CRESTRONCP3 Crestron 3-Series Control System

1 $60.98 $60.98CRESTRONPWE-4803RU CRESTRON-PoE Injector universal 100-250 Volts AC

2 $426.83 $853.66NoneFS728TP-100NAS NETGEAR ProSafe FS728TP 24 Port 10/100 Smart Switch with 4 Gigabit P

1 $853.66 $853.66CRESTRONTSW-750-B-S Crestron 7″ Surface Mount Touch Screen, Black Smooth

1 $121.95 $121.95CRESTRONTSW-750-TTK-B-S CRESTRON TSW-750-TTK-B-S: TableTop Kit for TSW-750, Black Smooth

1 $335.37 $335.37CRESTRONCEN-RFGW-EX-PWE Crestron-Infinet Ex Gateway W/Poe Injector Includes Pwe-4803Ru

1 $225.61 $225.61CRESTRONGLA-EXPEX Crestron Green Light? Wireless Expander for infiNET EX? Networks [Relea

1 $91.46 $91.46CRESTRONCNXRMAK Crestron-Rack Mount Kit

12 $304.88 $3,658.56CRESTRONINET-IOEX-RYIO CRESTRON INET-IOEX-RYIO: infiNET EX Wireless Relay/Digital Input Co

16 $6.96 $111.36COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

4 $179.04 $716.16COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

4 $83.09 $332.36COVIDP-CVGAAID-50M COVID P-CVGAAID-50M: VGA Cable w/ Aud, Plenum, M/M, Passes ID Bits

12 $52.20 $626.40COVIDP-HD24-16M COVID 16 FOOT HDMI CABLE

12 $42.96 $515.52COVIDP-CVGAID-25M Cable, VGA, M/M, Passes ID Bits, Plenum, 25ft

176 $90.00 $15,840.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

Page 18 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

27 $100.00 $2,700.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

32 $100.00 $3,200.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

3 $90.00 $270.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

1 $2,012.20 $2,012.20CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSAPPLICATIONS PROG CCS- Applications Programming

$83,290.35MATH CENTER Subtotal

RECEPTION LOBBY 4 $597.56 $2,390.24Bright SignXD1230 Bright Sign Xd1230: Full Hd Interactive Display Controller With Live Hdtv P

4 $92.45 $369.80CHIEFMSTU CHIEF-MEDIUM FIXED THINSTALL UNIVERSAL

4 $1,142.68 $4,570.72NEC DISPLAYV423-AVT NEC,V423 42” LED LCD Monitor 1920×1080 (FHD), integrated ATSC Tune

4 $6.96 $27.84COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

16 $90.00 $1,440.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

3 $100.00 $300.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSAPPLICATIONS PROG CCS- Applications Programming

1 $243.90 $243.90CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

1 $664.63 $664.63CRESTRONMPC-M10-B-T Crestron-Media Presentation Controller? M10 – 10 Buttons & Volume Contr

$10,387.13RECEPTION LOBBY Subtotal

TRAINING ROOM 1 $11,096.71 $11,096.71LIFESIZE1000-0000-1137 LifeSize Team 220 – 10x – Dual MicPod

Page 19 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

1 $805.35 $805.35LIFESIZE1000-21E0-1129 LifeSize Team 220 – Partner Assurance Maintenance Services (1-year)

1 $2,133.29 $2,133.29LIFESIZE1000-0000-0410 LifeSize Camera 10x

1 $153.66 $153.66LIFESIZE1000-21E0-0410 LISFESIZE CAMERA 10X ASSURANCE SERVICES

1 $30.49 $30.49COVIDQT-0037146 COVID WALL PLATE

2 $307.30 $614.60ATLONAAT-HDVS-TX-WP HDMI and VGA Transmitter wall plate

2 $351.21 $702.42ATLONAAT-HDVS-RX Atlona Hdmi Receiver With Built-In Scaler

1 $1,097.55 $1,097.55ATLONAAT-H2H-44M Atlona 4 by 4 HDMI Matrix Switcher

1 $5,974.39 $5,974.39SMARTSBID8055i-SMP SMART SBID8055i-SMP: SMART Board 55” Interactive Display with SMAR

1 $3,036.59 $3,036.59NECNP-PA550W-13ZL Nec Np-Pa550w With Np13zl. Bundle Includes Pa550w Projector And Np13

1 $99.23 $99.23CHIEFRPAUW Chief-Universal Rpa White

1 $42.24 $42.24CHIEFCMA110 Chief Cma-110 Flat Ceiling Plate

1 $199.76 $199.76CHIEFLTMU Chief Tilt Mount

1 $3,741.46 $3,741.46DALITE24053LS TENSIONED ADVANTAGE ELECTROL 16:10 60″ X 96″

6 $120.73 $724.38ASTATIC900W Astatic Overhead Hanging Microphone-white

2 $25.61 $51.22SHUREUA820G Shure 1/2 Wave Omnidirectional Antenna for U4D and U4Sin the G1 band

2 $18.29 $36.58SHUREUA505 SHURE REMOTE ANTENNA MNTNG BRACKET

1 $840.24 $840.24SHUREULXP24/58-G3 Shure Wireless Handheld Mic And Reciever System

1 $865.85 $865.85SHUREULXP14/85-G3 Shure Includes WL185 Microflex Cardioid Lavalier Microphone

1 $425.61 $425.61SHUREUA844SWB Shure Wb Uhf 4 Way Active Ant. Splitter

1 $204.87 $204.87ATLONAAT-HD570 ATLONA HDMI DE-EMBEDER

1 $2,193.90 $2,193.90BIAMPNEXIA TC Biamp Dsp For Teleconferencing Applications.

1 $465.40 $465.40CROWN1160A Crown Audio Amp 1 Inputs (1) 160W Outputs 70V/4 Ohm

6 $141.06 $846.36TOAF-2852CU2 TOA,Co-axial Ceiling Speaker, 6.5”, Back-can, 25/70.7 V Xfmr, 60 W, 8/16

1 $622.48 $622.48MID ATLANTICPTRK-2726 27 SPACE (47 1/4″) 26″ DEEP PORTABLE ROLLING RACK WITH LOCKI

1 $128.05 $128.05APCG5BLK APC-Premium surge protection and noise filtering, 15 AMP,rack mount

Page 20 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

5 $179.04 $895.20COVIDP-HD24-50RM COVID,HDMI Cable w/ Ethernet and Repeater, Plenum, 50ft

6 $6.96 $41.76COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

2 $6.13 $12.26COVIDVPR1211-06AM VGA CABLE WITH AUDIO 6 FOOT

2 $2.55 $5.10CABLES TO GO28106-C2G CABLES TO GO-2M Usb Cable

1 $109.76 $109.76VADDIO535-2000-222 Vaddio-Thin Profile Wall Mount For Lifesize Hd Camera

1 $213.41 $213.41VADDIO535-2000-292 Vaddio-Drop Down Ceiling Mount For Large Ptz Cameras – Short

1 $1,097.56 $1,097.56CRESTRONCP3 Crestron 3-Series Control System

1 $792.68 $792.68CRESTRONTSW-550-B-S 5” Touch Screen, Black Smooth

1 $60.98 $60.98CRESTRONPWE-4803RU CRESTRON-PoE Injector universal 100-250 Volts AC

1 $274.39 $274.39NetgearGS108P-100NAS Netgear Gs108p Prosafe Ethernet Switch – 8-Port

1 $335.37 $335.37CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

48 $90.00 $4,320.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

8 $100.00 $800.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

16 $100.00 $1,600.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

8 $100.00 $800.00CCSAPPLICATIONS PROG CCS- Applications Programming

$48,671.15TRAINING ROOM Subtotal

WAITING LOBBY 1 $2,751.22 $2,751.22VIEWSONICEP5502 VIEWSONIC EP5502: 55in ePoster. Full HA 1920×1080 electronic poster d

1 $364.63 $364.63VIEWSONICEP-EW-55-02 VIEWSONIC EP-EW-55-02: ePoster Extended Warranty for 2nd and 3rd ye

4 $597.56 $2,390.24Bright SignXD1230 Bright Sign Xd1230: Full Hd Interactive Display Controller With Live Hdtv P

3 $92.45 $277.35CHIEFMSTU CHIEF-MEDIUM FIXED THINSTALL UNIVERSAL

3 $1,142.68 $3,428.04NEC DISPLAYV423-AVT NEC,V423 42” LED LCD Monitor 1920×1080 (FHD), integrated ATSC Tune

Page 21 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

4 $6.96 $27.84COVIDVP-HD-NN-06 COVID 6 FOOT HDMI CABLE

1 $3,048.78 $3,048.78CCSNOW SERVING SYST NOW SERIVING SYSTEM VIDEO OVERLAY

48 $90.00 $4,320.00CCSINSTALL CCS Install

3 $100.00 $300.00CCSPROJECT MANAGE CCS-Project Management

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSPROGRAMMING CCS-Programming

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSENGINEERING CCS-Design & Engineering

1 $90.00 $90.00CCSDOCUMENTATION CCS Documentation

1 $100.00 $100.00CCSAPPLICATIONS PROG CCS- Applications Programming

1 $548.78 $548.78CCSMATERIALS CCS Misc Connectors, Hardware, Etc.

1 $664.63 $664.63CRESTRONMPC-M10-B-T Crestron-Media Presentation Controller? M10 – 10 Buttons & Volume Contr

1 $183.11 $183.11ATLAS SOUNDTSD-GPN1200 ATLAS SOUND TSD, SND MSK GEN, 12W, 70V OUT

1 $626.72 $626.72CROWNCDI1000 Crown Cdi1000 Solid-State, 2-Channel Amp

1 $55.54 $55.54QUAMMA/E9/S2/T8 Quam Sound Masking Speaker,8″,Upward Facing

1 $106.12 $106.12MID ATLANTICBRK10 Mid Atl – 10 Spc Melamine Rack

1 $128.05 $128.05APCG5BLK APC-Premium surge protection and noise filtering, 15 AMP,rack mount

$19,601.05WAITING LOBBY Subtotal

Page 22 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Quote: 2014-03-010 – NAU Design 17350 N. Hartford Dr., Scottsdale, AZ 85255 3633 E. Irvington, Tucson, AZ 85714 6501Eagle Rock NE, Bldg A, Ste 3, Albuquerque, NM 87113

480-348-0100 520-318-0100 505-999-1399

Customer Name: DWL ARCHITECTS Date: 4/21/2014

Qty Product Number Manufacturer Description Sale Price Extended Sale Price

$719,620.37System Total

Estimated Tax $39,820.66

Confidential Proposal This proposal is confidential. Any use of this proposal for solicitation of bids from

Customer Acceptance

Print Name Date

Designer: JOHN BELISLE

Salesperson: ABE ASSAD III

18,482.71

Quote Total

Shipping

777,923.74

This quote does not include additional costs associated with Davis-Bacon Act – Prevailing Wage Projects.

Page 23 of 23 Date Printed: 4/21/2014Alternative: Revision:0

 

 

Network and Electrical  considerations

Room ‐ Type ‐ Device Location AUDITORIUM 5 WALL MOUNTED ELECTRICAL  66″ AFF 10 WALL MOUNTED NETWORK 66″ AFF 3 ELECTRICAL IN FLOOR BOXES FLOOR BOX 3 NETWORK IN FLOOR BOXES  FLOOR BOX 1 ELECTRICAL QUAD AT RACK LOCATION  18″ AFF  5 NETWORK AT RACK LOCATION 18″ AFF  2 ELECTRICAL 1 AT EACH PROJECTOR CEILING MOUNTED 2 NETWORK 1 AT EACH PROJECTOR  CEILING MOUNTED 2 ELECTRICAL 1 AT EACH SCREEN  CEILING WHIP 1 NETWORK DROP AT TOUCH PANEL  48″ AFF

1ST FLOOR CONFERENCE 2 ELECTRICAL IN FLOOR BOX FLOOR BOX 2 ELECTRICAL 1 AT EACH SCREEN CEILING WHIP 2 ELECTRICAL 1 AT EACH PROJECTOR  CEILING MOUNTED 2 NETWORK 1 AT EACH PROJECTOR CEILING MOUNTED 2 NETWORK 1 AT EACH FLOOR  FLOOR BOX 3 NETWORK AT RACK LOCATION AT RACK LOCATION 1 POTS TYPE PHONE LINE AT RACK LOCATION

INTERVIEW ROOMS 1 ELECTRICAL BEHIND DISPLAY 66″ AFF 1 NETWORK BEHIND DISPLAY 66″ AFF 1 NETWORK AT TOUCH PANEL LOCATION SERVICE LOOP ABOVE CEILING

WAITING LOBBY 3 ELECTRICAL 1 AT EACH DISPLAY 66″AFF 1 ELECTRICAL AT WAYFINDER  18″AFF 6 NETWORK 2 AT EACH DISPLAY  66″AFF 2 NETWORKS AT WAYFINDER

RECEPTION  4 ELECTRICAL 1 BEHIND EACH DISPLAY  66″AFF 8 NETWORK 2 BEHIND EACH DISPLAY 66″AFF

TRAINING ROOM 1 ELECTRICAL PROJECTOR  CEILING MOUNTED 1 ELECTRICAL SMART  66″ AFF 1 NETWORK PROJECTOR  CEILING MOUNTED  1 NETWORK SMART 66″ AFF

CCS Presentation Systems

Not for construction Preliminary only

 

 

3 NETWORK AT RACK  18″AFF 1 ELECTRICAL AT RACK  18AFF 1 ELECTRICAL AT SCREEN  CEILING WHIP 1 POTS TYPE PHONE LINE AT RACK LOCATION

2 ND FLOOR CLASSROOM TYP 3 NON COMBINE  1 ELECTRICAL RACK 18″ AFF 3 NETWORK AT RACK 18″AFF 1 ELECTRICAL FLOOR BOX FLOOR BOX 1 NETWORK FLOOR BOX FLOOR BOX 1 ELECTRICAL AT SCREEN  CEILING WHIP 1 ELECTRICAL AT PROJECTOR CEILING MOUNT 1 NETWORK AT PROJECTOR  CEILING MOUNT

2 ND FLOOR CONFERENCE 1 ELECTRICAL AT RACK LOCATION 18″ AFF 1 NETWORK AT RACK LOCATION 18″AFF 1 NETWORK AT PROJECTOR LOCATION CEILING MOUNTED 1 ELECTRICAL AT PROJECTOR LOCATION CEILING MOUNTED 1 ELECTRICAL AT FLOOR BOX FLOOR BOX 2 NETWORK AT FLOOR BOX LOCATION FLOOR BOX 1 ELECTRICAL AT SCREEN LOCATION  CEILING WHIP

2ND FLOOR LOBBY 2 ELECTRICAL 1 TO EACH DISPLAY 66″ AFF 4 NETWORK 2 TO EACH DISPLAY  66″ AFF

2ND FLOOR LOUNGES 1 ELECTRICAL BEHIND EACH DISPLAY (2 ROOMS)  66″ AFF 1 NETWORK BEHIND EACH DISPLAY (2ROOMS)  66″ AFF

2ND FLOOR TESTING 1 ELECTRICAL RACK 18″ AFF 3 NETWORK AT RACK 18″AFF 1 ELECTRICAL FLOOR BOX FLOOR BOX 1 NETWORK FLOOR BOX FLOOR BOX 1 ELECTRICAL AT SCREEN  CEILING WHIP 1 ELECTRICAL AT PROJECTOR CEILING MOUNT 1 NETWORK AT PROJECTOR  CEILING MOUNT

2ND FLOOR MATH CENTER 4 ELECTRICAL 1 AT EACH OF THE PROJECTORS CEILING MOUNTED 4 NETWORK 1 AT EACH OF THE PROJECTORS CEILING MOUNTED 3 ELECTRICAL 1 AT EACH OF THE THREE DS DISPLAYS 66″ AFF 6 NETWORK 2 AT EACH OF THE THREE DS DISPLAYS 66″ AFF 24 NETWORK 4 AT EACH OF THE 6 CENTER PILLARS TBD 24 ELECTRICAL 4 AT EACH OF THE 6 CENTER PILLARS TBD

 

 

1 QUAD AT THE RACK LOCATION  18″AFF

2ND FLOOR TUTORIAL 2 ELECTRICAL 1 AT EACH PROJECTOR LOCATION CEILING MOUNTED 2 NETWORK 1 AT EACH PROJECTOR LOCATION CEILING MOUNTED 3 NETWORK AT RACK LOCATION 18″ AFF 1 ELECTRICAL AT RACK LOCATION 18″ AFF 2 ELECTRICAL 1 AT EACH SCREEN LOCATION CEILING WHIP 2 NETWORK 1 AT EACH KEYPAD LOCATION (TP)  CEILING WHIP

3RD FLOOR LG CONFERENCE 1 ELECTRICAL AT RACK LOCATION 18″ AFF 1 NETWORK AT RACK LOCATION 18″AFF 1 NETWORK AT PROJECTOR LOCATION CEILING MOUNTED 1 ELECTRICAL AT PROJECTOR LOCATION CEILING MOUNTED 1 ELECTRICAL AT FLOOR BOX FLOOR BOX 2 NETWORK AT FLOOR BOX LOCATION FLOOR BOX 1 ELECTRICAL AT SCREEN LOCATION  CEILING WHIP

3RD FLOOR SM CONFERENCE 1 ELECTRICAL AT RACK LOCATION 18″ AFF 1 NETWORK AT RACK LOCATION 18″AFF 1 NETWORK AT PROJECTOR LOCATION CEILING MOUNTED 1 ELECTRICAL AT PROJECTOR LOCATION CEILING MOUNTED 1 ELECTRICAL AT FLOOR BOX FLOOR BOX 2 NETWORK AT FLOOR BOX LOCATION FLOOR BOX 1 ELECTRICAL AT SCREEN LOCATION  CEILING WHIP

3RD FLOOR LOBBY 1 ELECTRICAL AT DISPLAY LOCATION 66″ AFF 2 NETWORK AT DISPLAY LOCATION 66″ AFF

3RD FLOOR LOUNGE 1 ELECTRICAL BEHIND DISPLAY  66″ AFF 1 NETWORK BEHIND DISPLAY 66″ AFF

4TH FLOOR LG CONFERENCE 1 ELECTRICAL AT RACK LOCATION 18″ AFF 1 NETWORK AT RACK LOCATION 18″AFF 1 NETWORK AT PROJECTOR LOCATION CEILING MOUNTED 1 ELECTRICAL AT PROJECTOR LOCATION CEILING MOUNTED 1 ELECTRICAL AT FLOOR BOX FLOOR BOX 2 NETWORK AT FLOOR BOX LOCATION FLOOR BOX 1 ELECTRICAL AT SCREEN LOCATION  CEILING WHIP

4TH FLOOR SM CONFERENCE 1 ELECTRICAL AT RACK LOCATION 18″ AFF

 

 

1 NETWORK AT RACK LOCATION 18″AFF 1 NETWORK AT PROJECTOR LOCATION CEILING MOUNTED 1 ELECTRICAL AT PROJECTOR LOCATION CEILING MOUNTED 1 ELECTRICAL AT FLOOR BOX FLOOR BOX 2 NETWORK AT FLOOR BOX LOCATION FLOOR BOX 1 ELECTRICAL AT SCREEN LOCATION  CEILING WHIP

4TH FLOOR LOBBY 1 ELECTRICAL AT DISPLAY LOCATION 66″ AFF 2 NETWORK AT DISPLAY LOCATION 66″ AFF

4TH FLOOR LOUNGE 1 ELECTRICAL BEHIND DISPLAY  66″ AFF 1 NETWORK BEHIND DISPLAY 66″ AFF

 

 

NAU Student and Academic Services Building: Project Program Report (April 21, 2014).

 

 

Appendix 6. PRELIMINARY ESTIMATED ENERGY CONSUMPTION SUMMARY

 

 

 

 

 

 

2333 W Northern Ave, #9 . Phoenix, Arizona 85021-9334 . Telephone 602.249.1320 . Facsimile 602.336.3276

NAU STUDENT AND ACADEMIC SERVICES BUILDING

PRELIMINARY ESTIMATED ENERGY CONSUMPTION SUMMARY The New Northern Arizona University campus Student and Academic Services Building will be an approximately 93,000 square foot academic building that will include an auditorium, mathematics computer lab, classrooms, faculty offices, restrooms, circulation, support facilities, and a mechanical penthouse. Facility mechanical system components will include chilled water variable-air-volume (VAV) air handling units with VAV boxes with hot water heat, perimeter finned tube convectors, steam to hot water heat exchangers, and heating hot water pumps. The following summary is a preliminary estimate of the annual energy consumption for the proposed NAU SAS building, based on the current Schematic Design Documents and an average weather year. As the design evolves and becomes more complete, we expect these numbers to change. At this level in the design, we have had to make many assumptions in order to come up with these estimated numbers. We have listed our assumptions below.

ASSUMPTIONS All mechanical, plumbing, and fire protection systems will be designed to meet NAU’s design guidelines and specifications, including the design temperatures listed below. The specific design criteria to which the mechanical systems have been designed at the schematic design level are as follows: Summer Outdoor: 90°F db, 65°F wb Summer Indoor: 78°F Winter Outdoor: -20°F Winter Indoor (Mechanical Rooms): 50°F Winter Indoor (All Other Rooms): 72°F For energy modeling purposes, we have assumed setbacks of 5°F above cooling and 5°F below heating during unoccupied hours. The following building envelope values have been used in the model and are based on the current architectural schematic design values. If values have not yet been specified as part of the architectural design, we have used ASHRAE 189.1 minimum values for those envelope components. We expect these values to be optimized as the design and final energy model are developed in order to maximize the LEED required energy cost savings. Preliminary Envelope Values: Roofs Insulation Entirely Above Deck U=0.026 Walls Above Grade Steel Framed U=0.064 Floors Mass U=0.074 Floor (Slab Edge) Slab-On-Grade F=0.93 Vertical Glazing Metal Framing (All Other) U=0.45, SHGC=0.35 Skylight w/ Curb Plastic, 0-2% of Roof U=1.10, SHGC=0.77 Lighting Values: 1.0 Watt Per Square Foot

 

 

 

Page 2

In order to run this preliminary energy model, utilization schedules were created based on the predicted use of this building. The attached spreadsheets indicate the scheduling assumptions used in the energy model. The total energy consumption of the building is directly related to the quantity and frequency of loads being present in the building. Schedules were made for people, lighting, and miscellaneous loads, such as computers, printers, and other equipment. The values listed in the schedules are percentages of the estimated full load in that particular space. For example, if the schedule says 90% for people, that would quantify as 90% of the maximum number of occupants for that given space. We have assumed that this building will be operated year-round and that it will be unoccupied on the weekends.

ESTIMATED ENERGY CONSUMPTION SUMMARY

Based on the assumptions made above and the current schematic design documents, our preliminary energy model has calculated the following estimations on the annual energy consumption of each utility. These values will not reflect the actual energy consumption of the building and can be anticipated to vary significantly. The energy model is based on an average weather year and does not include any temperature extremes. The people, light, and equipment schedules used in the model were developed on assumptions made by the design team, and may not necessarily reflect the actual building use. The building envelope and mechanical system modeled are based on the schematic design drawings and will be optimized as the design progresses. Electrical Consumption 869,088 kWh / year Electrical Peak Demand 306 kW Plant Chilled Water Consumption 1,490,100 MBH / year Plant Chilled Water Peak Demand 183.3 tons Plant Steam Consumption 1,405,300 MBH / year Plant Steam Peak Demand 900 MBH Cooling Coil Sum of Peaks 199.0 tons Steam Load Sum of Peaks 4,351 MBH These values do not include energy consumed by the snow melt system or site lighting, as those systems have not yet been designed, and their quantity and size is not yet at a level where a reasonable prediction could be made for their energy consumption. Both of these systems will be included in our final energy model as is required by LEED. The discrepancy between the calculated peak loads and the sum of peaks is due to the use of demand control ventilation (DCV) and the utilization schedules that have been implemented. This discrepancy is especially apparent when looking at the heating peak values. The HVAC systems will be sized to handle the sum of peaks in the event that there is a large outside air demand when the outdoor air is at its coldest, but the energy model indicates that during the heating peak, outside air is at a minimum value since the building would not be occupied overnight. This accounts for the large discrepancy between the steam peak demand calculated in the model and the sum of the peak heating coil demands when the outside air is at its maximum DCV value.

 

 

NAU SAS – Assumed Schedules (Weekdays, Yearround) Weekends – Unoccupied

14009 – Lights – Office % 14009 – Lights – Office % 14009 – Misc. – Office %

Midnight – 7am 0 Midnight – 7am 5 Midnight – 7am 5

7am-8am 35 7am-8am 50 7am-8am 35

8am-10am 90 8am-10am 90 8am-10am 90

10am-Noon 95 10am-Noon 95 10am-Noon 95

Noon-2pm 80 Noon-2pm 80 Noon-2pm 80

2pm-4pm 95 2pm-4pm 95 2pm-4pm 95

4pm-6pm 85 4pm-6pm 85 4pm-6pm 85

6pm-8pm 10 6pm-8pm 50 6pm-8pm 10

8pm-10pm 0 8pm-10pm 5 8pm-10pm 5

10pm-Midnight 0 10pm-Midnight 5 10pm-Midnight 5

14009 – People – Study % 14009 – Lights – Study % 14009 – Misc – Study %

Midnight – 7am 0 Midnight – 7am 0 Midnight – 7am 0

7am-8am 0 7am-8am 0 7am-8am 0

8am-10am 20 8am-10am 20 8am-10am 20

10am-Noon 40 10am-Noon 40 10am-Noon 40

Noon-2pm 40 Noon-2pm 40 Noon-2pm 40

2pm-4pm 60 2pm-4pm 60 2pm-4pm 60

4pm-6pm 80 4pm-6pm 80 4pm-6pm 80

6pm-8pm 50 6pm-8pm 50 6pm-8pm 50

8pm-10pm 20 8pm-10pm 20 8pm-10pm 20

10pm-Midnight 20 10pm-Midnight 20 10pm-Midnight 20

14009 – People – Conf % 14009 – Lights – Conf % 14009 – Misc – Conf %

Midnight – 7am 0 Midnight – 7am 0 Midnight – 7am 0

7am-8am 0 7am-8am 0 7am-8am 0

8am-10am 50 8am-10am 100 8am-10am 75

10am-Noon 80 10am-Noon 100 10am-Noon 75

Noon-2pm 30 Noon-2pm 100 Noon-2pm 75

2pm-4pm 80 2pm-4pm 100 2pm-4pm 75

4pm-6pm 50 4pm-6pm 100 4pm-6pm 75

6pm-8pm 0 6pm-8pm 0 6pm-8pm 0

8pm-10pm 0 8pm-10pm 0 8pm-10pm 0

10pm-Midnight 0 10pm-Midnight 0 10pm-Midnight 0

Tutorial Rooms / Study

Conference Rooms / Training

People Lighting Misc.

Offices / Lobbies / Reception / Testing

 

 

14009 – People – Break % 14009 – Lights – Break % 14009 – Misc – Break %

Midnight – 7am 0 Midnight – 7am 0 Midnight – 7am 40

7am-8am 30 7am-8am 100 7am-8am 80

8am-10am 50 8am-10am 100 8am-10am 60

10am-Noon 50 10am-Noon 100 10am-Noon 60

Noon-2pm 95 Noon-2pm 100 Noon-2pm 100

2pm-4pm 40 2pm-4pm 100 2pm-4pm 60

4pm-6pm 20 4pm-6pm 100 4pm-6pm 60

6pm-8pm 0 6pm-8pm 0 6pm-8pm 40

8pm-10pm 0 8pm-10pm 0 8pm-10pm 40

10pm-Midnight 0 10pm-Midnight 0 10pm-Midnight 40

14009 – People – Math % 14009 – Lights – Math % 14009 – Misc – Math %

Midnight – 7am 0 Midnight – 7am 0 Midnight – 7am 0

7am-8am 40 7am-8am 100 7am-8am 100

8am-10am 80 8am-10am 100 8am-10am 100

10am-Noon 100 10am-Noon 100 10am-Noon 100

Noon-2pm 100 Noon-2pm 100 Noon-2pm 100

2pm-4pm 100 2pm-4pm 100 2pm-4pm 100

4pm-6pm 100 4pm-6pm 100 4pm-6pm 100

6pm-8pm 80 6pm-8pm 100 6pm-8pm 100

8pm-10pm 50 8pm-10pm 100 8pm-10pm 100

10pm-Midnight 0 10pm-Midnight 0 10pm-Midnight 0

14009 – People – Class % 14009 – Lights – Class % 14009 – Misc – Class %

Midnight – 7am 0 Midnight – 7am 0 Midnight – 7am 0

7am-8am 40 7am-8am 100 7am-8am 60

8am-9am 0 8am-9am 0 8am-9am 0

9am-10am 95 9am-10am 100 9am-10am 95

10am-11am 0 10am-11am 0 10am-11am 0

11am-Noon 40 11am-Noon 100 11am-Noon 60

Noon-1pm 0 Noon-1pm 0 Noon-1pm 0

1pm-2pm 95 1pm-2pm 100 1pm-2pm 95

2pm-3pm 0 2pm-3pm 0 2pm-3pm 0

3pm-4pm 80 3pm-4pm 100 3pm-4pm 95

4pm-5pm 0 4pm-5pm 0 4pm-5pm 0

5pm-6pm 0 5pm-6pm 0 5pm-6pm 0

6pm-8pm 0 6pm-8pm 0 6pm-8pm 0

8pm-10pm 0 8pm-10pm 0 8pm-10pm 0

10pm-Midnight 0 10pm-Midnight 0 10pm-Midnight 0

Break Rooms / Lounges

Math Center

Auditorium / Classrooms

 

  • NAU SAS SD Narrative-Struct.pdf
    • Flagstaff AZ, 86011

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